Weather Alerts For Our Hearing Impaired Viewers.

September 23rd, 2011 at 8:25 am by under Weather

Jim Spencer and the KXAN First Warning Weather Team have long been promoters of the use of weather radios and often times, these devices have saved lives… but with a large deaf community in Central Texas, I thought we would share

A “bed shaker” is a device that literally buzzes when activated and an example of one is shown here. A link to the the company that sells these can be found at the bottom of this post.

It’s a simple device that plugs into the headphone jack on a weather radio and whenever an alert is received, the device vibrates.  It can easily exist under a pillow and is a very effective way to receive alerts in a non-verbal manner.

It may seem like we will ever get rain but Fall in Texas can often bring flash flooding and can be a very serious threat in a very short time.

here’s the link to the product mentioned.

http://www.silentcall.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=9&products_id=67

-shawn

One Response to “Weather Alerts For Our Hearing Impaired Viewers.”

  1. Deaf Deaf says:

    Please be advised that the term, “hearing impaired” is unacceptable. Here is the explanation:

    The term “Hearing Impaired” is a technically accurate term much preferred by hearing people, largely because they view it as politically correct. In the mainstream society, to boldly state one’s disability (e.g., deaf, blind, etc.) is somewhat rude and impolite. To their way of thinking, it is far better to soften the harsh reality by using the word “impaired” along with “visual”, “hearing”, and so on. “hearing-impaired” is a well-meaning word that is much-resented by deaf and hard of hearing people.

    While it’s true that their hearing is not perfect, that doesn’t make them impaired as people. Most would prefer to be called Deaf, Hard of Hearing or deaf when the need arises to refer to their hearing status, but not as a primary way to identify them as people (where their hearing status is not significant).

    We are deaf, and not people with impairments (obstacles) in life!

    Hope that you and your people respect by refusing to use the outdated and offensive term.