Quick Weather Overview

July 1st, 2013 at 9:35 am by under Weather

Here is a quick rundown about what is happening around the country and other parts of the planet in the world of weather:

 

1.  Record Heat Cooking The West Coast

west

Las Vegas tied its all-time record high Sunday, and warnings and advisories for extreme heat have been posted across parts of eight western states as a large, hot dome of high pressure builds over the region.

In addition to the heat in the West, we saw record June heat as far east as Texas over the weekend.

Sunday’s high of 117 degrees at McCarran International Airport tied the all-time record for any month of the year in Las Vegas. That mark had previously been achieved July 24, 1942, and July 19, 2005.

As those 117-degree readings both occurred in July, Sunday’s 117 marked the hottest June day on record in Sin City.

Temperatures will continue to soar well into the 110′s and even 120′s into the week ahead across the Southwest.

Hot temperatures will also spread throughout the valleys of the Great Basin and Northwest, but generally not to the levels we are seeing in the Desert Southwest.  That said, triple-digit heat will sear areas as far north as the lower elevations of eastern Washington and western Montana at least through Tuesday.

 

2.  Drenching Rains Funneling Up The Eastern Seaboard


east

Showers and thunderstorms capable of triggering new flash flooding incidents and localized severe weather will continue to plague the East through the first part of the week and into the Fourth of July.

The humid, moist flow that set up across the East last week will persist through this week, providing fuel for more drenching showers and thunderstorms from Maine through Florida.

Showers and thunderstorms are also extending back into parts of the Ohio and Tennessee valleys, but the number turning heavy and severe will be more localized than those to the east.

The showers and thunderstorms will be most numerous across the Appalachians and East Coast through Tuesday.

The axis of the heaviest showers and thunderstorms may shift away from the Southeast and southern mid-Atlantic coasts Wednesday through Thursday, focusing from the Florida Panhandle up the spine of the Appalachian Mountains and through the Northeast.

 

3.  Dahlia Continues To Spin In The Pacific

dahlia

TROPICAL STORM DALILA DISCUSSION NUMBER   6
NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL       EP042013
200 AM PDT MON JUL 01 2013

THE CLOUD PATTERN HAS NOT BECOME ANY BETTER ORGANIZED DURING THE
PAST FEW FEW HOURS AS INDICATED BY IR IMAGERY. THE OUTFLOW IS
LIMITED TO THE WESTERN SEMICIRCLE AND THERE ARE NO WELL DEFINED
BANDING FEATURES. A BLEND OF T-NUMBERS FROM BOTH TAFB AND SAB
SUPPORTS KEEPING THE INITIAL INTENSITY AT 40 KNOTS. DALILA STILL
HAS AN OPPORTUNITY TO STRENGTHEN DURING THE NEXT 24 TO 36 HOURS
BEFORE A PORTION OF THE CIRCULATION MOVES OVER COOLER WATERS.
NEITHER SHIPS NOR LGEM MODELS ARE VERY ENTHUSIASTIC ABOUT
DALILA...AND IN FACT...THE LATEST HWRF ONLY INCREASES THE WIND
SLIGHTLY. BASED ON CONTINUITY...THE OFFICIAL FORECAST STILL CALLS
FOR DALILA TO REACH HURRICANE STATUS...BUT THIS IS BECOMING LESS
LIKELY TO OCCUR.  

DALILA IS MOVING TOWARD THE NORTHWEST OR 310 DEGREES AT 8 KNOTS. A
STRONG HIGH PRESSURE TO THE NORTH WILL SOON FORCE DALILA TO TAKE A
MORE WESTERLY TRACK WITH A DECREASE IN FORWARD SPEED. THIS IS THE
SOLUTION PROVIDED BY MOST OF THE GUIDANCE DURING THE NEXT 2 TO 3
DAYS.  THEREAFTER...THE GUIDANCE BECOMES HIGHLY DIVERGENT SINCE
SOME MODELS DEVELOP A LARGE DISTURBANCE TO THE EAST OF DALILA...AND
SUGGEST THAT DALILA WILL ROTATE AROUND THE NEW DISTURBANCE. THE
OFFICIAL FORECAST ASSUMES...BEYOND 3 DAYS...THAT DALILA INSTEAD
WILL CONTINUE SLOWLY WESTWARD SOUTH OF THE SUBTROPICAL RIDGE.

IF THE TREND TOWARD THE WEST CONTINUES AND DALILA DOES NOT INTENSIFY
MUCH MORE...THE TROPICAL STORM WARNING FOR MEXICO WILL LIKELY NO
LONGER BE REQUIRED.  

4.  Typhoon Rumbia Nearing Landfall In South China

runbia

Rumbia is expected to slam onshore early Tuesday morning local time (Monday afternoon CDT) between Hong Kong and the Luichow Peninsula.

While currently a minimal typhoon, Rumbia should weaken to a strong tropical storm prior to landfall due to the interaction with land. Regardless of its exact classification, the impacts on South China will be the same.

 

Rumbia’s damaging winds will range from 50 to 80 mph (80 to 130 km/h) within a small area along the coast where Rumbia makes landfall.

Rumbia’s storm surge will be responsible for water levels reaching 2 to 4 feet (0.5 to 1.2 m), perhaps up to 5 feet (1.5 m) in isolated areas, above normal high-tide along the coastline.

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