David Mazza

Hot, Hot, Hot!

July 6th, 2012 at 9:26 pm by under Weather

If you are like me, I am sure you have a Facebook account full of friends posting pictures of how hot it is… everywhere but here!  Yes, its still been quite warm here, but our 100 yesterday and 99 today seem tolerable when considering much of the mid section of the country is pushing 100-109 the last few afternoons.  A huge ridge of high pressure has been bringing extremely high temperatures, and mainly dry weather.  Also, an abnormally dry and warm winter has left much of the Midwest with much drier soil, and adds to the heat.  This is something we have learned a lot in the past few years, the dry years are the hottest ones.  Even this year, when the rain stopped falling the temps started to climb.  Luckily for everyone the ridge is going to start breaking down and shifting west.  This should allow us to see more clouds and start to increase our rain chances later this weekend.  By next week we might even get lucky enough to get a weak frontal boundary down here.  This hopefully should give us a few days in a row of below normal temps, and much above normal rain chances.

 

Below is a map showing high temps across the eastern half of the nation today (click on the map for a larger image)

Below are climate state summaries from the National Weather Service from today.

:ID LOCATION HIGH LOW PCPN   
**Illinois**
ORD : CHICAGO-O'HARE : 103 / 82 / 0.00   
CGX : CHI-NORTHERLY ISLE : 95 / 83 /   
MDW : CHICAGO-MIDWAY : 104 / 83 / 0.00   
LOTI2: NWS ROMEOVILLE : 101 / 78 / 0.00   
RFD : ROCKFORD : 104 / 77 / 0.00   
DPA : DUPAGE AIRPORT : 100 / 78 / 0.00   
UGN : WAUKEGAN : 100 / 80 / 0.00   
ARR : AURORA AIRPORT : 100 / 74 / 0.00   
PWK : WHEELING : 104 / 81 / 0.00   
MLI : MOLINE : 100 / 72 / 0.00   
BMI : BLOOMINGTON : 103 / 75 / 0.00   
CMI : CHAMPAIGN : 100 / 71 / 0.00   
DEC : DECATUR : 104 / 74 / 0.00   
LWV : LAWRENCEVILLE : 105 / 76 / 0.00   
ILX : NWS LINCOLN : 102 / 69 / 0.00   
MTO : MATTOON : 103 / 67 / 0.00   
PIA : PEORIA : 103 / 74 / 0.00   
SPI : SPRINGFIELD : 104 / 73 / 0.00   
CPS : CAHOKIA : 107 / 76 / 0.00   
UIN : QUINCY : 105 / 78 / T   
MDH : CARBONDALE : 107 / 74 / 0.00
 **Indiana**
EVV : EVANSVILLE : 104 / 75 / 0.11 / M / M   
FWA : FORT WAYNE AIRPOR : 101 / 72 / T / M / M   
IND : INDIANAPOLIS : 105 / 77 / 0.00 / 0.0 / 0   
SBN : SOUTH BEND : 102 / 77 / 0.00 / M / M   
BMG : BLOOMINGTON : 104 / 69 / 0.00 / M / M   
EYE : EAGLE CREEK ARPT : 102 / 76 / 0.00 / M / M   
GSH : GOSHEN AIRPORT : 104 / 74 / 0.00 / M / M   
HNB : HUNTINGBURG : M / M / M / M / M   
LAF : LAFAYETTE : 102 / 72 / 0.00 / M / M   
MIE : MUNCIE : 101 / 75 / 0.00 / M / M   
GEZ : SHELBYVILLE : 105 / 73 / 0.00 / M / M   
HUF : TERRE HAUTE : 106 / 75 / 0.00 / M / M   
VPZ : VALPARAISO : 100 / 77 / 0.00 / M / M  
 **Missouri**
CGI : CAPE GIRARDEAU : 106 / 73 / 0.00 / /   
CDJ : CHILLICOTHE : 102 / 71 / 0.00 / /   
COU : COLUMBIA : 106 / 78 / 0.00 / /  
FAM : FARMINGTON : 102 / 73 / 0.36 / /   
JEF : JEFFERSON CITY : 105 / 76 / 0.00 / /   
JLN : JOPLIN : 102 / 74 / 0.00 / /   
MCI : KANSAS CITY INTL : 104 / 75 / 0.00 / /   
MKC : KANSAS CITY DWTN : 105 / 81 / 0.00 / /   
IRK : KIRKSVILLE : 103 / 69 / 0.00 / /   
AIZ : OSAGE BEACH : 106 / 72 / 0.00 / /   
POF : POPLAR BLUFF : 104 / 75 / T / /   
UIN : QUINCY : 105 / 78 / T / /   
STJ : ST. JOSEPH : 100 / 70 / 0.00 / /   
DMO : SEDALIA : 106 / 77 / 0.00 / /   
SUS : CHESTERFIELD : 107 / 75 / 0.00 / /   
SGF : SPRINGFIELD : 103 / 72 / 0.00 / /   
SET : ST CHARLES : 105 / 77 / 0.00 / /   
STL : ST. LOUIS : 106 / 83 / 0.00 / /   
VIH : ROLLA/VICHY : 102 / 74 / 0.00 / /   
UNO : WEST PLAINS : 104 / 73 / 0.01 / / 
 **Texas**
:...NORTH TEXAS...   
ABI : ABILENE : 98 / 73 / 0.00/   
GKY : ARLINGTON : 98 / 73 / 0.00/   
CRS : CORSICANA : 98 / 75 / 0.00/   
DAL : DALLAS LOVE FIELD : 100 / 80 / 0.00/   
DFW : DFW AIRPORT : 99 / 77 / 0.00/   
DTO : DENTON : 99 / 73 / 0.00/   
AFW : FORT WORTH ALLIANCE : 100 / 76 / 0.00/   
FTW : FORT WORTH MEACHAM : 99 / 75 / 0.00/   
GGG : LONGVIEW : 99 / 77 / 0.00/   
LFK : LUFKIN : 97 / 74 / 0.28/   
TKI : MCKINNEY : 99 / 72 / 0.00/   
MWL : MINERAL WELLS : 99 / M / 0.00/   
PRX : PARIS : 99 / 73 / 0.00/   
TPL : TEMPLE : 99 / 73 / 0.00/   
TRL : TERRELL : 99 / 74 / 0.00/   
TYR : TYLER : 97 / 75 / 0.00/   
ACT : WACO : 100 / 76 / 0.00/   
SPS : WICHITA FALLS : 102 / 74 / 0.00/   
:...WEST TEXAS...   
AMA : AMARILLO : 95 / 67 / 0.00/   
CDS : CHILDRESS : 100 / 72 / 0.00/   
DHT : DALHART : 96 / 66 / 0.00/   
6R6 : DRYDEN : 95 / 70 / 0.00/   
ELP : EL PASO : 87 / 69 / 0.44/   
FST : FORT STOCKTON : 93 / 72 / 0.00/   
GDP : GUADALUPE PASS : 81 / 61 / 1.60/   
LBB : LUBBOCK : 95 / 65 / 0.00/   
MRF : MARFA : 81 / 63 / 0.00/   
MAF : MIDLAND : 95 / 68 / 0.01/   
ODO : ODESSA : 94 / 68 / 0.00/   
PEQ : PECOS : 92 / 69 / 0.32/   
SJT : SAN ANGELO : 99 / 69 / 0.00/   
INK : WINK : 94 / 68 / T /   
:...SOUTH TEXAS...   
ALI : ALICE : 100 / 75 / 0.00/   
ATT : AUSTIN MABRY : 99 / 75 / 0.00/   
AUS : AUSTIN BERGSTROM : 97 / 71 / 0.00/   
BPT : BEAUMONT : 93 / 73 / 0.01/   
BRO : BROWNSVILLE : 93 / 76 / 0.00/   
BMQ : BURNET : 98 / 74 / 0.00/   
CLL : COLLEGE STATION : 98 / 73 / 0.00/   
CXO : CONROE : 95 / 69 / 0.00/   
CRP : CORPUS CHRISTI : 95 / 74 / 0.17/   
NGP : NAVY CORPUS : 90 / 77 / 0.00/   
COT : COTULLA : 101 / 74 / 0.00/   
DRT : DEL RIO : 100 / 77 / 0.00/   
GLS : GALVESTON : 91 / 81 / 0.00/   
HRL : HARLINGEN : 98 / 74 / 0.00/   
HDO : HONDO : 98 / 73 / 0.00/   
HOU : HOUSTON HOBBY : 94 / 76 / 0.00/   
IAH : HOUSTON BUSH : 95 / 74 / 0.00/   
UTS : HUNTSVILLE : 98 / 75 / 0.00/   
JCT : JUNCTION : 97 / 75 / 0.00/   
NQI : KINGSVILLE : 99 / 73 / 0.00/   
LRD : LAREDO : 103 / 78 / 0.00/   
MFE : MCALLEN : 102 / 69 / 0.00/   
BAZ : NEW BRAUNFELS : 96 / 73 / 0.00/   
PSX : PALACIOS : 91 / 79 / 0.00/   
LVJ : PEARLAND : 93 / 75 / 0.16/   
RKP : ROCKPORT : 92 / 76 / 0.00/   
SAT : SAN ANTONIO : 97 / 78 / 0.00/   
SSF : SAN ANTONIO STINSON : 98 / 75 / 0.00/   
HYI : SAN MARCOS : 97 / 73 / 0.00/   
DWH : TOMBALL : 97 / 70 / 0.02/   
VCT : VICTORIA : 96 / 72 / 0.00/    
.OTHERS     
SHV : SHREVEPORT : 101 / 73 / 0.17/   
TXK : TEXARKANA : 102 / 78 / 0.00/  




Wet start to one of the driest months of the year

July 1st, 2012 at 9:48 pm by under Weather

 

With the end of June, or as I should call it, ‘April 2.0′ our hopes weren’t great for rainfall.  Typically June is one of the wettest months of the year her in Austin.  At Mabry June averages 4.33″ of rainfall ranking #2 only behind May.  At ABIA the 4.38″ average makes June the wettest month on average.  By contrast in July the averages are only 1.88″ at Mabry and 2.45″ at ABIA, which rank #12 and #6 as far as the wettest months.

Below are some crazy stats to chew on from today’s rainfall when you compare it to our two driest months so far this year.

Mabry ABIA
Rainfall today 0.38″ 0.41″
Rainfall April 0.22″ 0.09″
Rainfall June 0.06″ 0.21″
Today vs Apr/Jun 0.10″ 0.11″
Today vs Apr % 173% 456%
Today vs Jun % 633% 195%
Today vs Apr/Jun 136% 137%

Today’s rainfall totals at Mabry and ABIA rank as the 13th and 14th heaviest daily rainfall total for 2012.

Mabry ABIA
Rank Date Rainfall Rank Date Rainfall
1 9-Jan 0.87 1 9-Jan 0.62
2 24-Jan 0.4 2 25-Jan 5.66
3 25-Jan 3.14 3 31-Jan 0.48
4 17-Feb 0.53 4 4-Feb 1.7
5 18-Feb 1.72 5 17-Feb 0.59
6 9-Mar 1.27 6 18-Feb 1.1
7 10-Mar 0.77 7 9-Mar 1.08
8 20-Mar 2.77 8 10-Mar 0.65
9 6-May 0.69 9 20-Mar 2.69
10 7-May 0.42 10 6-May 0.73
11 10-May 2.7 11 10-May 2.85
12 15-May 0.88 12 14-May 0.6
13 1-Jul 0.38 13 15-May 0.6
14 1-Jul 0.41

 


Record heat continues!!

June 27th, 2012 at 9:35 pm by under Weather

 

 

Today we broke another record high temperature at Camp Mabry, and tied a record out at the airport (ABIA).   The 106 we hit at Mabry broke a record that was set back in 1980 at 105 degrees and hit again in 2009.  The 104 at ABIA tied a record set back in 1980.  This record breaking heat seems more and more to be the norm in our area as many records have fallen this year and in the past few years.  Below is a list of the record high temps recorded at Mabry for each month of the year.

Month Record Temp Year
Jan 90 1971
Feb 99 1996
Mar 98 1971
Apr 99 2006
May 104 1925
Jun 109 2012
Jul 109 1954
Aug 112 2011
Sep 112 2000
Oct 100 1938
Nov 91 2006/1951
Dec 90 1955

 

Looking at the list you will notice 6 of the 12 monthly high temps have occurred in the past 16 years.   Also, the high temp of 109 yesterday wasn’t just crazy hot for June, but for any time of the year here in Austin.  In fact, there have only been 5 other days that have been hotter than yesterday here in Austin, and all of them have occurred since 2000!

Temp Date
112 9/5/2000
112 8/28/2011
110 9/4/2000
110 8/27/2011
110 9/4/2000
109 6/26/2012


Over the next 7 days I am not forecasting any more record temps, but we are going to be within a few degrees of the record high most of the next 7 days.  Make sure to remember safety in the heat, lots of fluids, frequent breaks, light weight light colored clothing.  Of course if you have elderly family and friends its always a good idea to help them out, especially with anything that will take them out in the heat.  Children also need to avoid prolonged exposure to the heat.


Tropical Storm Debby Soaking Florida

June 24th, 2012 at 10:24 pm by under Weather

The 10pm data is out on Tropical Storm Debby, and it is not good news for parts of Florida.  The latest advisory (#7) shows the winds have remained at 60mph, and the movement continues to be stationary.  The storm has had some drier air move into the core, so the majority of the rainfall right n0w is falling over Florida.  Since the storm is over warm Gulf waters, and in a relatively low sheared environment, the system is forecast to moisten up over the next day or two as it slowly drifts northward.  A building ridge to the north is blocking the Tropical Storm from moving much through the day today.  Forecast models keep this ridge blocking the storm from moving much over the next few days, and then as the ridge breaks down, it will allow for some movement to the northeast later in the week.

Below are the forecast model tracks for Debby tonight.  Finally we are seeing a lot more agreement compared to 24 hours ago.

 

The official NHC forecast for Debby is below, and it shows that slow movement to the north over the next few days.

If this forecast does verify, this could mean record amounts of rainfall over the next few days in Florida.  Below is the Hydrometeorological Prediction Center rainfall estimate total for the next 5 days.  If you look at the bulls-eye near the Florida Panhandle…that is right, almost 2 feet(23.7″)!!!


Tropical Storm Debby 10am Update

June 24th, 2012 at 10:19 am by under Weather

The latest update to Tropical Storm Debby shows wind speeds near 60mph, with the movement to the northeast at 6 mph.  The forecast models are continuing to push to the right of the previous runs, and the latest National Hurricane Center forecast reflects this.  Below if the morning hurricane forecast model runs for Debby.  Below that is the 10am update (advisory #5) for Tropical Storm Debby from the NHC.  If this forecast pans out, hot and dry weather will continue for us.


Tropical Storm Debby forms

June 23rd, 2012 at 10:09 pm by under Weather

The latest advisory has been issued (#2) on Tropical Storm Debbie.  The winds are at 50mph with the storm and it is not moving at this time.   The majority of the moisture with Debby is in the eastern half of the storm, pounding the state of Florida with rain.  There have been some Tropical Storm Warnings issued for the northern Gulf coast in Louisiana as the storm is only about 210 miles south.  The official forecast track from the National Hurricane Center has about a day of northerly movement, and then a turn to due west.  If this does pan out, that would take the storm into the Lower Texas Coast late next work week.  However, as you can see below the forecast models are really all over the place on where this storm will go over the next 5 days.  The one thing that is consistent is the northerly movement through tomorrow.  The white line is the official NHC forecast.

The forecast track from the Hurricane Center assumes a ridge to the north will steer the storm mainly west heading through the work week.  The intensity forecast also shows Debby becoming a Category 1 strength hurricane by Tuesday as it enters a more favorable environment with much less wind shear.

Since the path of the storm is still more than 100 hours out from the Texas coast, I have put together some graphics to give you an idea of what to expect from Debby based on the eventual track.

If the storm follows the track above, the impact on us would be very hot and dry weather, with a north to northwesterly dry flow.

The path above shaded in green would produce our best chances of rain and thunderstorms.  This also would bring the threat of heavy rainfall, gusty winds (especially if it becomes a hurricane), and isolated weak tornadoes.

The more southern plot above could produce more of an easterly wind, which would increase our muggy factor, but give us no more than a few isolated showers or a t-storm or two.  Remember Dolly a few years ago?

We will continue to monitor and track this storm throughout the weekend and the work week.  In the short term, temps are going to ramp back up into the 100s, so make sure you drink lots of water, wear that light weight, light colored clothing, and take it east outside.


Summer *officially* starts this week

June 17th, 2012 at 12:04 pm by under Weather

Hard to believe, but summer hasn’t officially started yet.  Yea, we have already hit 100, and we have hit 90 so many times it seems pointless to go back and count them :)  The Summer Solstice officially starts Wednesday evening at 6:09pm our time.  This is the point when the sun is the farthest north point in the sky.  If you are sick of the really long days, well there is some good news.  The days will start to get shorter in the weeks following the start of the Summer Solstice.   By shorter, I am talking about the amount of sunlight, we will still have 24 hours in each day, just the sunrises will be later and the sunsets will be earlier.  If you are ready for some temperature relief, well the start of summer normally means hotter weather is to come.  Typically temps will continue to increase, and will stay hot into the first few weeks of September, and then temps start to relax.  This might seem odd since the Earth’s tilting causes the sun to start moving southward on Thursday, but you have to consider the physics at work.  The Earth’s atmosphere, ground, and waters all have properties to retain heat and energy.  The rates at which each absorbs and releases energy are different.  So during the summer the Sun is still quite strong, and the ground and water are quite warm.  They continue to absorb the Sun’s energy, and are also releasing collected energy.  The net effect for a couple of months is even warmer temperatures.  By the middle of September the Sun is almost directly overhead of the Equator, and far enough away that the absorption of energy is a lot less.  Think about the hottest time of the day this time of year, about 3pm-5pm?  Well, the sun gives off its strongest energy between 12p-2pm, but is still quite strong through the later part of the afternoon.  The sun is still giving us strong energy, and the ground is also giving off energy, working together to make max temps.  Typically the coolest time of the day this time of the year is around sunrise, when we have had the maximum amount of time without collecting the Sun’s energy.

Our Earth takes a roughly 365.24 day trip around the Sun on its orbit.  What a lot of people probably don’t realize, is that when we have our summer here in Texas, the Earth is actually at its farthest point away from the sun.  That’s right, the first day of summer for us, the Earth is the farthest away from the Sun, and the first day of Winter, we are the closest.  On Wednesday we will be approximately 94.5 million miles from the Sun.  On the first day of Winter we will be approximately 91.4 million miles, or about 3.1 million miles closer to the Sun.  The Earth follows an oval shaped orbit, so the Southern Hemisphere starts its Summer when the Earth is closest to the sun.   It is the tilt of the Earth on that orbit that produces the seasons.  If you were assuming that the Southern Hemisphere has a always has a warmer Summer because it is closer to the Sun…. not so much.  Because North has more land and the South has more water, and the rates that land and water heat and cool are far different, the temperatures in each are different as well.  Its not to say that you can’t have scorching heat, or air so cold it burns in the Southern or Northern Hemisphere.


Tropical moisture possible late next weekend?

June 16th, 2012 at 4:26 pm by under Weather

First off, I am not getting too excited yet, but several forecast models are developing an area of low pressure in the Bay of Campeche or into the Gulf of Mexico late next work week and into the weekend.  The reason I say I am not getting to excited yet, it a LOT of things can change between now and then.  Also, the models are differing on how strong this system will get, and the exact track.  The track is quite an important feature if the low does form, because it can mean the difference in getting well needed rainfall, or getting bone dry, hot air.  As of now I think if the low does form, that we will be on the dry side of this system on Friday with more of a northerly flow.  With drier air in place this time of the year, we might get lucky and get a comfortable start to the day, but in the afternoon we are going to see hot temperatures.  While a weak tropical storm might not seem like a bad thing, especially given how are away we are from the coast, we have to be careful what we wish for.  Remember  just a few years back when Tropical Storm Hermine came through the area.  It did produce some tropical storm forced winds, but the rainfall was too much, too quickly.  Camp Mabry picked up more than 7.5″ of rain in a two day period, with most of the metro picking up between 6-12″ of rainfall.  Some isolated areas picked up more than 15″ of rainfall from the event in Williamson County.   Tropical storms can produce amazing rainfall amounts when they move inland, especially when they stall out, or make sharp turns.  Another case to look at was back in 1979 when Tropical Storm Claudette came ashore near Houston, went inland, stalled, weakened, and then moved on.  It dumped between 30-43″ of rainfall in a 24 hour period!!  That’s right, 24 hour rainfall totals were recorded in a 2.5-3.5 FOOT range between Freeport and Alvin, Texas.  There were reports of almost 4 foot totals near Alvin by the time the storm moved on.

So I am in no way wishing away rainfall to our area, we just need good moderate amounts of rainfall, vs a deluge.  We will be closely monitoring this *possible* system late into next week.  If it does follow some of the models and goes into Mexico, then it will just be muggy and warm late next weekend.  If it follows a more northerly track, well then we could get some rainfall for the first full week of summer.

Below is the GFS forecast model graphic for 7am next Saturday morning.    You can see the low about 200 miles southeast of Brownsville, with all the moisture in the Gulf, and the dry air over Texas.   Hopefully this low comes inland, and the only damage is does, is to the current drought here in the state.

 


Nice week ahead, relatively speaking

June 10th, 2012 at 9:24 pm by under Weather

Today was the hottest day of the year so far, with a high temperature of 97 at both Camp Mabry and at ABIA.  The forecast for the next week actually shows hotter temperatures for Monday afternoon with a high of 98, but then a small cool down.  Normal high temperatures for this week range from about 92 today to 93 by next weekend.  So on paper, our forecast for the next week would appear to be quite hot, with highs ranging from 98 tomorrow to 94 by the 2nd half of the week.  Don’t get me wrong, it is quite warm, but not compared to last year.  I went back and looked at the data from 2011, and it was pretty crazy.  In fact, last year we set record high temps on June 13th, then for 5 straight days on June 15-19th.

Below is a graphic showing our high today, and the forecast forecast for the next 7 days.  Below it I posted the readings from last year, the numbers in orange are the record high temps that were set on that day here in Austin.

Below are the 43 record high temperatures that we set last year here in Austin.  Notice that the data hits a wall come the fall, right around the same time it finally started to rain once again.  No record highs were set in October, November, or December of last year.

2011 Record High
18-Mar 88
1-Apr 93
8-Apr 93
22-Apr 94
9-May 99
25-May 100
27-May 100
28-May 100
5-Jun 101
6-Jun 103
7-Jun 100
13-Jun 101
15-Jun 104
16-Jun 103
17-Jun 106
18-Jun 106
19-Jun 105
3-Jul 102
22-Jul 104
23-Jul 104
24-Jul 105
25-Jul 105
1-Aug 107
2-Aug 107
4-Aug 107
5-Aug 106
9-Aug 106
14-Aug 105
15-Aug 105
19-Aug 107
20-Aug 106
22-Aug 105
27-Aug 110
28-Aug 112
29-Aug 109
30-Aug 105
31-Aug 107
11-Sep 104
12-Sep 105
13-Sep 105
14-Sep 103
24-Sep 99
29-Sep 101

 

 


End of the week rainfall

June 9th, 2012 at 9:41 pm by under Weather

This week’s rainfall wasn’t what most of us have hoped for.  In fact today is only the 9th day of the month and we are already about 1.5″ below normal for rainfall this month.  Typically June is one of our wettest months, so every day it doesn’t rain, we are slowly tipping the scales back to the drought.  Some folks did get some decent rainfall amounts yesterday.  I saw rain two different times, and it probably was because I washed my car on Thursday for the first time in probably 2 months.   Below are the rainfall reports from the COCORAHS rainfall observer network from 7am Friday – 7am Today.

TX-BST-49 : MCDADE 4.6 SSW           *   : 1.00 
TX-BST-51 : BASTROP 5.2 SE           *   : 0.59 
TX-FY-38  : SCHULENBURG 0.6 NNE      *   : 0.51 
TX-TV-114 : AUSTIN 8.2 WSW           *   : 0.28 
TX-CML-09 : NEW BRAUNFELS 7.0 NNE    *   : 0.26 
TX-BST-36 : BASTROP 1.0 WNW          *   : 0.24 
TX-HYS-19 : SAN MARCOS 2.9 WNW       *   : 0.22 
TX-LV-21  : HALLETTSVILLE 8.0 N      *   : 0.21 
TX-FY-32  : FLATONIA 0.4 SW          *   : 0.15 
TX-CML-80 : NEW BRAUNFELS 6.3 NNE    *   : 0.13 
TX-CLD-02 : LOCKHART 4.8 SSE         *   : 0.11 
TX-BST-09 : SMITHVILLE 6.5 NNW       *   : 0.10 
TX-CLD-13 : LOCKHART 5.2 S           *   : 0.10 
TX-CLD-14 : LULING 6.9 NW            *   : 0.10 
TX-BST-43 : DALE 7.6 N               *   : 0.09 
TX-TV-121 : AUSTIN 8.9 S             *   : 0.09
TX-CLD-24 : LOCKHART 2.2 SSE         *   : 0.08 
TX-FY-01  : SMITHVILLE 6.6 SE        *   : 0.08 
TX-CLD-23 : RED ROCK 5.4 SSW         *   : 0.06 
TX-FY-03  : LA GRANGE 10.2 NW        *   : 0.06 
TX-FY-08  : FLATONIA 10.7 NNW        *   : 0.06 
TX-BST-55 : JEDDO                    *   : 0.05 
TX-CML-56 : NEW BRAUNFELS 8.5 N      *   : 0.03
TX-HYS-03 : WIMBERLEY 4.4 E          *   : 0.03
TX-HYS-28 : MANCHACA 2.1 ENE         *   : 0.03 
TX-TV-34  : SUNSET VALLEY 0.7 SE     *   : 0.02 
TX-TV-111 : AUSTIN 10.8 WSW          *   : 0.02 
TX-CLD-12 : HARWOOD 4.7 NNE          *   : 0.01 
TX-TV-113 : AUSTIN 7.3 SW            *   : 0.01