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Get Ready For Tonight’s Lunar Eclipse!

April 14th, 2014 at 7:59 am by under Weather

nasa_lunar_226

Types of Lunar Eclipses

An eclipse of the Moon (or lunar eclipse) can only occur at Full Moon, and only if the Moon passes through some portion of Earth’s shadow. That shadow is actually composed of two cone-shaped components, one nested inside the other. The outer or penumbral shadow is a zone where the Earth blocks part but not all of the Sun’s rays from reaching the Moon.In contrast, the inner or umbral shadow is a region where the Earth blocks all direct sunlight from reaching the Moon.

Astronomers recognize three basic types of lunar eclipses:

1. Penumbral Lunar Eclipse

  • The Moon passes through Earth’s penumbral shadow.
  • These events are of only academic interest because they are subtle and hard to observe.

2. Partial Lunar Eclipse

  • A portion of the Moon passes through Earth’s umbral shadow.
  • These events are easy to see, even with the unaided eye.

3. Total Lunar Eclipse

  • The entire Moon passes through Earth’s umbral shadow.
  • These events are quite striking due to the Moon’s vibrant red color during the total phase (totality).

 

eclipse

Total Lunar Eclipse of April 15

The first eclipse of the year is well placed for observers throughout the Western Hemisphere. The eclipse occurs at the lunar orbit’s ascending node in Virgo. The apparent diameter of the Moon is close to its average since the eclipse occurs nearly midway between apogee (April 08 at 14:53 UT) and perigee (April 23 at 00:28 UT). This is the first of four consecutive total lunar eclipses in 2014 and 2015.

Moon’s orbital trajectory takes it through the southern half of Earth’s umbral shadow. Although the eclipse is not central, the total phase still lasts 78 minutes.   The times of the major eclipse phases are listed below:

          Penumbral Eclipse Begins:  04:53:37 UT = 10:53:37 CDT (4/14)
          Partial Eclipse Begins:    05:58:19 UT = 11:58:19 CDT (4/14)
          Total Eclipse Begins:      07:06:47 UT = 01:06:47 CDT
          Greatest Eclipse:          07:45:40 UT = 01:45:40 CDT
          Total Eclipse Ends:        08:24:35 UT = 02:24:35 CDT
          Partial Eclipse Ends:      09:33:04 UT = 03:33:04 CDT
          Penumbral Eclipse Ends:    10:37:37 UT = 04:37:37 CDT

At the instant of greatest eclipse (07:45:40 UT) the Moon lies at the zenith for a point in the South Pacific about 3000 km southwest of the Galapagos Islands. The umbral eclipse magnitude peaks at 1.2907 as the Moon’s northern limb passes 1.7 arc-minutes south of the shadow’s central axis. In contrast, the Moon’s southern limb lies 9.0 arc-minutes from the southern edge of the umbra and 40.0 arc-minutes from the shadow centre. Thus, the northern half of the Moon will appear much darker than the southern half because it lies deeper in the umbra. Since the Moon samples a large range of umbral depths during totality, its appearance will change significantly with time. It is not possible to predict the exact brightness distribution in the umbra, so observers are encouraged to estimate the Danjon value at different times during totality. Note that it may also be necessary to assign different Danjon values to different portions of the Moon (i.e., north verses south).

During totality, the spring constellations are well placed for viewing so a number of bright stars can be used for magnitude comparisons. Spica (m = +1.05) is the most conspicuous star lying just 2° west of the eclipsed Moon. This juxtaposition reminds the author of the total lunar eclipse of 1968 Apr 13 when Spica appeared only 1.3° southwest of the Moon at mid-totality. The brilliant blue color of Spica made for a striking contrast with the crimson Moon. Just a week past opposition, Mars (m = -1.4) appears two magnitudes brighter than Spica and lies 9.5° northwest of the Moon. Arcturus (m = +0.15) is 32° to the north, Saturn (m = +0.2) is 26° to the east, and Antares (m = +1.07) is 44° to the southeast.

The entire event is visible from both North and South America. Observers in the western Pacific miss the first half of the eclipse because it occurs before moonrise. Likewise most of Europe and Africa experience moonset just as the eclipse begins. None of the eclipse is visible from north/east Europe, eastern Africa, the Middle East or Central Asia.

The April 15 eclipse is the 56th eclipse of Saros[3] 122. This series began on 1022 August 14 and is composed of 74 lunar eclipses in the following sequence: 22 penumbral, 8 partial, 28 total, 7 partial, and 9 penumbral eclipses (Espenak and Meeus, 2009). The last eclipse of the series is on 2338 October 29.


Llano NOAA Weather Radio Transmitter Temporarily Out of Service

April 5th, 2014 at 10:20 pm by under Weather

 

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000
NOUS44 KEWX 051551
PNSEWX
TXZ171>173-183>194-202>209-217>225-228-061600-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE AUSTIN/SAN ANTONIO TX
1051 AM CDT SAT APR 5 2014

…LLANO NOAA WEATHER RADIO TRANSMITTER WWF-91 REMAINS OFF THE AIR…

THE LLANO NOAA WEATHER RADIO TRANSMITTER WWF-91 WHICH OPERATES ON
162.425 MHZ IS CURRENTLY OFF THE AIR. THE TRANSMITTER AND
EQUIPMENT WAS DAMAGED FROM A RECENT LIGHTNING STRIKE. THE
TRANSMITTER AND WEATHER RADIO BROADCAST WILL BE OFF THE AIR UNTIL
REPAIRS CAN BE MADE. DUE TO THE HEIGHT OF THE TOWER…SPECIALLY TRAINED
TECHNICIANS ARE HAVING TO BE BROUGHT IN. THE TRANSMITTER SHOULD
BE BACK UP BY THE END NEXT WEEK.

RESIDENTS MAY BE ABLE TO RECEIVE BROADCASTS FROM NEARBY TRANSMITTERS
IN AUSTIN 162.400 MHZ…KERRVILLE 162.450 MHZ…AND SAN SABA
162.525 MHZ OR GO DIRECTLY TO THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE
WEBPAGE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/AUSTIN

$$


NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement Project

February 27th, 2014 at 8:24 am by under Weather

Hopefully, we will soon be measuring precipitation from…. space??  Here is a brief overview of the GPM Project:

 

 

jaxa

nasa

 

Mission Overview

Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) is an international satellite mission to provide next-

generation observations of rain and snow worldwide every three hours. NASA and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) will launch the GPM Core Observatory satellite carrying advanced instruments that will set a new standard for prec

The GPM mission will help advance our understanding of Earth’s water and energy cycles, improve the forecasting of extreme events that cause natural disasters, and extend current capabilities of using satellite precipitation information to directly benefit society.ipitation measurements from space. The data they provide will be used to unify precipitation measurements made by an international network of partner satellites to quantify when, where, and how much it rains or snows around the world.

gpm

GPM Science and Applications

Water is fundamental to life on Earth. Knowing where and how much rain and snow falls globally is vital to understanding how weather and climate impact both our environment and Earth’s water and energy cycles, including effects on agriculture, fresh water availability, and responses to natural disasters. Since rainfall and snowfall vary greatly from place to place and over time, satellites can provide more uniform observations of rain and snow around the globe than ground instruments, especially in areas where surface measurements are difficult. GPM’s next-generation global precipitation data will lead to scientific advances and societal benefits in the following areas:

  • Improved knowledge of the Earth’s water cycle and its link to climate change
  • New insights into precipitation microphysics, storm structures and large-scale atmospheric processes
  • Extended capabilities in monitoring and predicting hurricanes and other extreme weather events
  • Improved forecasting abilities for natural hazards, including floods, droughts and landslides.
  • Enhanced numerical prediction skills for weather and climate
  • Better agricultural crop forecasting and monitoring of freshwater resources

This is just a brief overview.  For an in depth look at ALL of the details surrounding the GPM Project go to:

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/GPM/main/index.html#.Uw9KHuNdUgc


Red Flag Warning Today 11AM – 8PM

February 20th, 2014 at 9:07 am by under Weather

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Here is the latest update from the National Weather Service concerning the Red Flag Warning:

Red Flag Warning

URGENT - FIRE WEATHER MESSAGE
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE AUSTIN/SAN ANTONIO TX
554 AM CST THU FEB 20 2014

...RED FLAG WARNING IN EFFECT FROM 11 AM TO 8 PM CST FOR GUSTY
NORTH WINDS AND LOW RELATIVE HUMIDITIES FOR AREAS GENERALLY ALONG
AND WEST OF INTERSTATE 35...

.A PACIFIC FRONT WILL MOVE ACROSS SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS TODAY.
THIS FRONT WILL BRING MUCH DRIER AIR WITH GUSTY WINDS INTO THE
HILL COUNTRY BY LATE MORNING...THE INTO THE I- 35 CORRIDOR EARLY
BY EARLY AFTERNOON. RELATIVE HUMIDITIES WILL FALL INTO TO 10 TO 20
PERCENT RANGE BEHIND THE COLD FRONT. IN ADDITION... NORTHERLY
WINDS WILL INCREASE TO 15 TO 25 MPH WITH HIGHER GUSTS BETWEEN 30
AND 35 MPH.

 

...RED FLAG WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM 11 AM THIS MORNING TO
8 PM CST THIS EVENING FOR STRONG WINDS AND LOW RELATIVE
HUMIDITIES FOR AREAS ALONG AND WEST OF INTERSTATE 35...

* AFFECTED AREA...THE FOLLOWING SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS COUNTIES...
  LLANO...BURNET...WILLIAMSON...VAL VERDE...EDWARDS...REAL...
  KERR...BANDERA...GILLESPIE...KENDALL...BLANCO...HAYS...
  TRAVIS...KINNEY...UVALDE...MEDINA...BEXAR...COMAL...
  MAVERICK...ZAVALA...FRIO...DIMMIT.

* 20-FOOT WIND...NORTH WINDS 15 TO 25 MPH WITH HIGHER GUSTS.

* HUMIDITY...10 TO 20 PERCENT.

* IMPACTS...ANY FIRES THAT DEVELOP WILL LIKELY SPREAD RAPIDLY.
  OUTDOOR BURNING IS NOT RECOMMENDED.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A RED FLAG WARNING MEANS THAT CRITICAL FIRE WEATHER CONDITIONS
ARE EITHER OCCURRING NOW...OR WILL SHORTLY. A COMBINATION OF
STRONG WINDS...LOW RELATIVE HUMIDITY...AND WARM TEMPERATURES CAN
CONTRIBUTE TO EXTREME FIRE BEHAVIOR.

Prescribed Burn For Today

February 19th, 2014 at 7:08 am by under Weather

Due to breezy conditions in the forecast, this morning’s prescribed burn may be postponed.  We’ll keep you updated on the latest.  In the meantime, here is the burn that is scheduled for today:

 

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Prescribed Burn to Help Restore Native Grasslands on
Water Quality Protection Lands
AUSTIN — Austin Water’s Wildland Conservation division will conduct a prescribed burn on 147 acres of the Water Quality Protection Lands on Wednesday, February 19, at 10:30 a.m.

The Wildland Conservation division will manage the burn in cooperation with the Austin Fire Department, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and Hays County officials. The burn area will be patrolled extensively for up to one week after the fire.


Smoke may be visible west of Buda and south of FM 1826 from mid-morning to sunset. Because this prescribed burn will produce smoke, the public should be aware of this controlled event and use discretion when contacting emergency services.


To ensure a safe and effective burn, the burn boss follows protocols that take into account several factors including weather and vegetation conditions. Leading up to the burn these conditions are monitored closely and if conditions become unsuitable the prescribed burn will be rescheduled.


Prescribed fire is an effective  management tool on the Water Quality Protection Lands.  They are managed as grassland savanna environments to protect the quality and quantity of water reaching the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards Aquifer. Prescribed burns safely mimic the natural fire cycle and maintain fire-resilient landscapes for the benefit of people, water, and wildlife.



First NWS Skywarn Class Of The Season!!

January 30th, 2014 at 9:00 am by under Weather

skywarn

If you would like to attend the very first NWS Skywarn training session of 2014, head to the Burnet Community Center tonight!!!  The session will take place starting at 6:30pm and will roughly last through 8:30pm.  There is no pre-registration required and the event is FREE!!!  The address for the BCC is:  401 East Jackson.  

If you can’t make it tonight… here is a list of the rest of the Austin/San Antonio NWS Skywarn classes:

 

National Weather Service in Austin/San Antonio, TX
SKYWARNTM Spotter Training Schedule
Spring 2014 

Updated: 13 January 2014 20:24:01 

TBD = To Be Determined

DATE COUNTY CITY LOCATION TIME CLASS
January 30
2014
Burnet County Burnet Burnet Community Center – 401 East Jackson 630-830 PM Basic Class
February 10
2014
Williamson County Georgetown Grace Bible Church – 302 Serenada 7-9 PM Basic Class
February 22
2014
Travis County Austin 1020 Grove Blvd – ACC Riverside Campus Bldg G Room 8100 9AM – 4PM Basic and Advanced
March 05
2014
Williamson County Round Rock Jester Annex – 1801 E. Old Settlers Blvd 630-830 PM Basic Class
March 08
2014
Travis County Austin Weatherfest at the Bullock Museum – 1800 Congress Ave TBD Basic Class
March 19
2014
Bexar County Live Oak Live Oak Fire Station – 8001 Shin Oak Dr. 630-830 PM Basic Class
March 20
2014
Wilson County Floresville County Justice Center – 800 10th St. 630-830 PM Basic Class
March 22
2014
Bexar County San Antonio Stevens High School Auditorium – 600 N. Ellison 900AM – Noon Basic and Advanced 

NOAA’s 2013 By The Numbers

January 17th, 2014 at 9:03 am by under Weather

2013 BTN


2014 NWS Skywarn Schedule Announced!

January 13th, 2014 at 5:05 am by under Weather

skywarn

 

What is the Austin/San Antonio NWS Skywarn Program?

The Austin-San Antonio National Weather Service Office offers Skywarn severe weather training throughout year. Most Skywarn trainings are conducted in the Spring to coincide with severe weather season and allow citizens, first responders, emergency management, amateur radio operators, and volunteer organizations the opportunity to learn about severe weather preparedness and safety. Published trainings are all open to the general public.

After training is complete, usually 1.5 hours for the BASIC training, you will be an official weather spotter for the National Weather Service. The National Weather Service will count on you to be our “eyes” out in the field, when trying to verify severe weather across South Central Texas. With 33 counties under the jurisdiction of the Austin-San Antonio National Weather Service, it becomes very important to verify and accurately determine where severe weather is occurring. Real time reports to our office can save lives and property. Post storm reports can help help us find severe weather damage, tornado tracks, and verify severe weather warnings.

Skywarn training is now also offered online. This online training can be found athttps://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_course.php?id=23. This online training should only be used to supplement what is taught at a local NWS Skywarn training. Attendance at a local NWS Skywarn training is highly encouraged. Besides learning about severe weather topics specific to South Central Texas, procedures for reporting severe weather to the local Austin-San Antonio National Weather Service Office are also covered.

Please join us at one of the scheduled trainings. Additional trainings will be added to this site. If you would like the NWS to schedule a training in your area or schedule for a specific group, please contact Paul Yura, Warning Coordination Meteorologist, at 830-629-0130 ext 223 or email paul.yura@noaa.gov

tornado

2014 Austin/San Antonio NWS Skywarn Schedule

DATE COUNTY CITY LOCATION TIME CLASS
January 30
2014
Burnet County Burnet Burnet Community Center – 401 East Jackson 630-830 PM Basic Class
February 10
2014
Williamson County Georgetown Grace Bible Church – 302 Serenada 7-9 PM Basic Class
February 22
2014
Travis County Austin 1020 Grove Blvd – ACC Riverside Campus Bldg G Room 8100 9AM – 4PM Basic and Advanced
March 05
2014
Williamson County Round Rock Jester Annex – 1801 E. Old Settlers Blvd 630-830 PM Basic Class
March 08
2014
Travis Austin Weatherfest at the Bullock Museum – 1800 Congress Ave TBD Basic Class
March 20
2014
Wilson County Floresville County Justice Center – 800 10th St. 630-830 PM Basic Class
March 22
2014
Bexar County San Antonio Stevens High School Auditorium – 600 N. Ellison 900AM – Noon Basic and Advanced

 

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Cold Snaps Becoming Less Common?

January 10th, 2014 at 7:13 am by under Weather

Take a look at this interesting article from our friends at the Associated Press. 

 

Deep Freeze Weather Wimps

WASHINGTON (AP) — We’ve become weather wimps.

As the world warms, the United States is getting fewer bitter cold spells like the one that gripped much of the nation this week. So when a deep freeze strikes, scientists say, it seems more unprecedented than it really is. An Associated Press analysis of the daily national winter temperature shows that cold extremes have happened about once every four years since 1900.

Until recently.

When computer models estimated that the national average daily temperature for the Lower 48 states dropped to 17.9 degrees on Monday, it was the first deep freeze of that magnitude in 17 years, according to Greg Carbin, warning meteorologist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

That stretch — from Jan. 13, 1997 to Monday — is by far the longest the U.S. has gone without the national average plunging below 18 degrees, according to a database of daytime winter temperatures starting in January 1900.

In the past 115 years, there have been 58 days when the national average temperature dropped below 18. Carbin said those occurrences often happen in periods that last several days so it makes more sense to talk about cold outbreaks instead of cold days. There have been 27 distinct cold snaps.

Between 1970 and 1989, a dozen such events occurred, but there were only two in the 1990s and then none until Monday.

“These types of events have actually become more infrequent than they were in the past,” said Carbin, who works at the Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Okla. “This is why there was such a big buzz because people have such short memories.”

Said Jeff Masters, meteorology director of the private firm Weather Underground: “It’s become a lot harder to get these extreme (cold) outbreaks in a planet that’s warming.”

And Monday’s breathtaking chill? It was merely the 55th coldest day — averaged for the continental United States — since 1900.

The coldest day for the Lower 48 since 1900 — as calculated by the computer models — was 12 degrees on Christmas Eve 1983, nearly 6 degrees chillier than Monday.

The average daytime winter temperature is about 33 degrees, according to Carbin’s database.

There have been far more unusually warm winter days in the U.S. than unusually cold ones.

Since Jan. 1, 2000, only two days have ranked in the top 100 coldest: Monday and Tuesday. But there have been 13 in the top 100 warmest winter days, including the warmest since 1900: Dec. 3, 2012. And that pattern is exactly what climate scientists have been saying for years, that the world will get more warm extremes and fewer cold extremes.

Nine of 11 outside climate scientists and meteorologists who reviewed the data for the AP said it showed that as the world warms from heat-trapping gas spewed by the burning of fossil fuels, winters are becoming milder. The world is getting more warm extremes and fewer cold extremes, they said.

“We expect to see a lengthening of time between cold air outbreaks due to a warming climate, but 17 years between outbreaks is probably partially due to an unusual amount of natural variability,” or luck, Masters said in an email. “I expect we’ll go far fewer than 17 years before seeing the next cold air outbreak of this intensity.

And the scientists dismiss global warming skeptics who claim one or two cold days somehow disproves climate change.

“When your hands are freezing off trying to scrape the ice off your car, it can be all too tempting to say, ‘Where’s global warming now? I could use a little of that!’ But you know what? It’s not as cold as it used to be anymore,” Texas Tech University climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe said in an email.

The recent cold spell, which was triggered by a frigid air mass known as the polar vortex that wandered way south of normal, could also be related to a relatively new theory that may prove a weather wild card, said Rutgers University climate scientist Jennifer Francis. Her theory, which has divided mainstream climate scientists, says that melting Arctic sea ice is changing polar weather, moving the jet stream and causing “more weirdness.”

Ryan Maue, a meteorologist with the private firm Weather Bell Analytics who is skeptical about blaming global warming for weather extremes, dismisses Francis’ theory and said he has concerns about the accuracy of Carbin’s database. Maue has his own daily U.S. average temperature showing that Monday was colder than Carbin’s calculations.

Still, he acknowledged that cold nationwide temperatures “occurred with more regularity in the past.”

Many climate scientists say Americans are weather weenies who forgot what a truly cold winter is like.

“I think that people’s memory about climate is really terrible,” Texas A&M University climate scientist Andrew Dessler wrote in an email. “So I think this cold event feels more extreme than it actually is because we’re just not used to really cold winters anymore.”

___

Seth Borenstein can be followed at http://twitter.com/borenbears .


List Of Low Temperatures This AM

January 6th, 2014 at 1:15 pm by under Weather

Here is a list of recorded low temperatures from this morning courtesy of the NWS.

ABIA TIED RECORD LOW OF 22 DEGREES.  TIED PREVIOUS RECORD SET IN 1972.

 

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE AUSTIN/SAN ANTONIO TX
1141 AM CST MON JAN 6 2014

...LOW TEMPERATURES AROSS SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS THIS MORNING...

BELOW IS A SELECTED NUMBER OF WEATHER OBSERVING SITES AND THE
OBSERVED LOW TEMPERATURES FROM THIS MORNING. ALL AREAS EXPERIENCED
FREEZING TEMPERATURES WITH THE NORTH AND HILL COUNTRY SEEING
TEMPERATURES IN THE TEENS THIS MORNING.

LOCATION                              TEMP      TIME/DATE

BURNET (COOP BURT2)                    15        0800 AM 01/06
BURNET AIRPORT (KBMQ ASOS)             17        0753 AM 01/06
20 SSE SONORA (EDWT2 RAWS)             17        0746 AM 01/06
8 NNW LAGO VISTA (BNET2 RAWS)          17        0747 AM 01/06
1 N LBJ STATE PARK (BDTT2 RAWS)        18        0708 AM 01/06
JOHNSON CITY (COOP JCYT2)              18        0800 AM 01/06
SMITHVILLE (COOP SMHT2                 18        0840 AM 01/06
FREDERICKSBURG (T82 AWOS)              18        0735 AM 01/06
LOST MAPLES STATE PARK (LMNT2 RAWS)    18        0746 AM 01/06
GEORGETOWN AIRPORT (KGTU ASOS)         19        0648 AM 01/06
BLANCO (COOP BLCT2)                    19        0730 AM 01/06
AUSTIN GREAT HILLS (COOP AGHT2)        19        0700 AM 01/06
ROCKSPRINGS (KECU AWOS)                19        0755 AM 01/06
LAGO VISTA AIRPORT (KRYW ASOS)         19        0655 AM 01/06
AUSTIN EXECUTIVE AIRPORT (KEDC AWOS)   19        0735 AM 01/06
KERRVILLE AIRPORT (KERV AWOS)          19        0815 AM 01/06
LLANO (KAQO AWOS)                      19        0655 AM 01/06
1 NW CAMP SWIFT (BTRT2 RAWS)           20        0808 AM 01/06
NEW BRAUNFELS (COOP NBGT2)             20        0741 AM 01/06
HORSESHOE BAY AIRPORT (KDZB AWOS)      20        0715 AM 01/06
GIDDINGS (KGYB AWOS)                   22        0655 AM 01/06
BERGSTROM INTL AIRPORT (KAUS ASOS)     22        0653 AM 01/06
CAMP MABRY (KATT ASOS)                 22        0751 AM 01/06
GONZALES 1N  (COOP GNOT2)              23        0700 AM 01/06
1 E LA GRANGE (LGNT2 RAWS)             23        0803 AM 01/06
BOERNE STAGE AIRPORT (K5C1 AWOS)       23        0655 AM 01/06
NEW BRAUNFELS AIRPORT (KBAZ ASOS)      24        0751 AM 01/06
GONZALES AIRPORT (KT20 AWOS)           25        0715 AM 01/06
YOAKUM  (COOP YKMT2)                   25        0814 AM 01/06
RANDOLPH AFB  (KRND ASOS)              25        0758 AM 01/06
SAN ANTONIO INTL ARPT (KSAT ASOS)      27        0751 AM 01/06
PORT SAN ANTONIO  (KSKF ASOS)          27        0755 AM 01/06
HONDO MUNICIPAL AIRPORT (KHDO ASOS)    28        0751 AM 01/06
CASTROVILLE AIRPORT  (KCVB AWOS)       28        0715 AM 01/06
UVALDE AIRPORT (KUVA AWOS)             28        0735 AM 01/06
STINSON MUNICIPAL AIRPORT (KSSF ASOS)  29        0753 AM 01/06
PLEASANTON AIRPORT (KPEZ AWOS)         29        0815 AM 01/06
LAUGHLIN AFB (KDLF ASOS)               29        0758 AM 01/06
DEL RIO INTL AIRPORT  (KDRT ASOS)      30        0853 AM 01/06

OBSERVATIONS ARE COLLECTED FROM A VARIETY OF SOURCES WITH VARYING
EQUIPMENT AND EXPOSURE. NOT ALL DATA LISTED ARE CONSIDERED OFFICIAL.