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Our next Tropical Depression? The NWS thinks there’s a good chance.

July 29th, 2014 at 8:34 am by under Weather

NEXT TD

Tropical Weather Outlook Text

TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOK
NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL
800 AM EDT TUE JUL 29 2014

For the North Atlantic...Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico:

1. Satellite images indicate that showers and thunderstorms
associated with an area of low pressure located about 1600 miles
east of the southern Windward Islands continue to become better
organized.  This system could develop into a tropical depression
later today or tomorrow while it moves westward or
west-northwestward at 10 to 15 mph.
* Formation chance through 48 hours...high...70 percent.
* Formation chance through 5 days...high...80 percent.

TD PATH

 

IF this storm comes together it’s forecast path has it traveling toward the Gulf!


Beating The Heat: Safety Tips

July 21st, 2014 at 7:29 am by under Weather

1 SPC

If you plan on being out and about in summer, chances are you’ll be exposed to a lot of sun and higher temperatures.

Each year, heat kills at least 650 people on average in the United States — more than tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, lightning, or any other weather event combined.

“Heat can be a silent killer because it doesn’t topple trees or rip roofs off houses like tornadoes and hurricanes,” says Eli Jacks, chief of fire and public weather services with NOAA’s National Weather Service. “Nevertheless, it’s a dangerous weather condition for which people should prepare.”

How much heat can a person safely endure? It depends.

Certain groups of people should be especially careful during hot weather conditions. For example, city-dwellers and those living in the upper floors of tall buildings or in heat-prone regions are most at-risk for heat-related illness. People who have difficulty getting around or who have health conditions are particularly susceptible. The elderly and the very young also merit special attention during periods of high heat and humidity.

The National Weather Service and the  Occupational Safety and Health Administration have partnered again this year to increase awareness for outdoor workers and their employers during excessive heat events.  As part of this effort, the National Weather Service will incorporate specific outdoor worker safety precautions when heat advisories and warnings are issued.

 

083007_hot_thermometer

By taking some precautions, you can stay healthy while enjoying the great outdoors this summer:

1. Be informed and stay alert

Pay close attention to heat advisories or warnings that have been issued for your community.

  • NOAA’s National Weather Service continually updates heat-related advisories and warnings online at weather.gov. (Click on “Excessive Heat Warning” and “Heat Advisory” under the U.S. map — if there are no current warnings or advisories in the United States, nothing will appear).
  • NOAA issues excessive heat warnings when weather conditions pose an imminent threat to life andheat advisories when weather conditions are expected to cause significant discomfort or inconvenience or — if caution is not taken — become life threatening.
  • If you do not have Internet access, you can get heat advisory and warning information by watching your local television or radio newscast or by purchasing a NOAA weather radio and tuning into NOAA Weather Radio All-Hazards.
  • Use the temperature and humidity to figure out the heat index for your area, a measure that tells us how hot it feels.

2. Plan for periods of extreme heat

  • Visit your physician for a check-up to find out if you have a health condition that may be exacerbated by hot weather.
  • Service your air conditioner before hot weather arrives, and obtain window fans to help cool your home.
  • Know where to go when weather heats up. Find cool indoor places to spend time on hot summer days, such as a local library, shopping mall, museum or aquarium.

3. Know what to do and what not to do during hot weather

  • DO - Slow down, and reduce strenuous activity. Mow the lawn or garden in the early morning or late evening instead of midday.
  • DO - Dress in lightweight, nonrestrictive, light-colored clothing.
  • DO - Drink plenty of water or other nonalcoholic fluids.
  • DO - Eat light, easy-to-digest foods.
  • DO - Seek out shade if you have to be outdoors for extended periods. Spend more time in air-conditioned places.
  • DO - Check on elderly neighbors, friends and relatives to make sure they are okay.
  • DO - When outside, take frequent dips in the ocean or pool, or mist yourself with a water bottle. When inside, take frequent cool baths or showers and use cold compresses to cool off.
  • DO - Apply high-SPF sunscreen frequently when outdoors.
  • DO - Seek immediate medical attention if you experience symptoms of heat illness. (See chart below for symptoms, likely conditions and treatment.)

keep calm

However, please remember:

  • DO NOT leave children, the elderly, or pets in the car for any reason, for any length of time. A dark dashboard or seat can easily reach temperatures in the range of 180 to more than 200 degrees F!
  • DO NOT stay in the sun for long periods.
  • DO NOT take salt tablets unless directed by a physician.
  • AVOID alcoholic beverages; they can dehydrate you and increase your risk of heat stroke and other potentially fatal heat-related illnesses.

4. Know the warning signs of heat-related illness

Excessive heat exposure can raise your body temperature to unhealthy levels and may make you ill — it can also be deadly. Take the precautions listed above and be on the lookout for these warning signs that you may be in trouble:

Symptom Likely Condition Treatment
Painful muscle cramps and spasms, usually in muscles of legs and abdomen. Heavy sweating. Heat cramps Apply firm pressure on cramping muscles or gently massage to relieve spasm.

Give sips of water; if nausea occurs, discontinue water intake.

Consult with a clinician or physician if individual has fluid restrictions (e.g., dialysis patients).

Heavy sweating, weakness,
cool skin, pale and clammy. Weak pulse. Normal temperature possible. Possible muscle cramps, dizziness, fainting, nausea and vomiting.
Heat exhaustion Move individual out of sun, lay him or her down, and loosen clothing.

Apply cool, wet cloths.

Fan or move individual to air conditioned room.

Give sips of water; if nausea occurs, discontinue water intake.

If vomiting continues, seek immediate medical attention. Consult with a clinician or physician if individual has fluid restrictions (e.g., dialysis patients).

Altered mental state. Possible throbbing headache, confusion, nausea and dizziness. High body temperature (106°F or higher). Rapid and strong pulse. Possible unconsciousness. Skin may be hot and dry, or patient may be sweating. Sweating likely especially if patient was previously involved in vigorous activity. Heat stroke Heat stroke is a severe medical emergency.

Summon emergency medical assistance or get the individual to a hospital immediately.

Delay can be fatal.

Move individual to a cooler, preferably air-conditioned, environment.

Reduce body temperature with a water mister and fan or sponging.

Use air conditioners. Use fans if heat index temperatures are below the high 90s. Use extreme caution.

Remove clothing. If temperature rises again, repeat process. Do not give fluids.

 

 

 


National Weather Service Rainfall Total Summary From 7/17-7/18

July 18th, 2014 at 12:50 pm by under Weather

890

SXUS54 KEWX 181618

LCOEWX

 

COCORAHS PRECIPITATION SUMMARY

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE AUSTIN/SAN ANTONIO TX

1115 AM CDT FRI JUL 18 2014

 

COCORAHS PRECIPITATION REPORTS

THESE REPORTS ARE CONSIDERED SUPPLEMENTAL AND UNOFFICIAL

VALUES ARE FOR THE PREVIOUS 24 HOURS ENDING AROUND 7 AM LOCAL TIME

 

.B EWX 0718 C DH07/PP/SF/SD/SW

:

:COCORAHS PRECIPITATION REPORTS FOR THE LOCAL AREA

:

:                                               SNOW   SNOW  WATER

:                                        PCPN   FALL  DEPTH  EQUIV

:

TX-TV-201 : AUSTIN 4.2 ESE           *   : 8.25 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-118 : AUSTIN 4.5 ENE           *   : 5.71 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-47  : AUSTIN 4.7 E(JORDANPK)   *   : 5.53 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-159 : AUSTIN 1.0 NNE           *   : 5.38 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-88  : CEDAR PARK 1.5 WNW       *   : 5.21 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-106 : ROUND ROCK 4.7 ESE       *   : 5.20 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-11 : TIMBERWOOD PARK 7.7 ENE  *   : 5.12 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-167 : AUSTIN 3.0 E             *   : 5.10 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-166 : CEDAR PARK 2.4 WNW       *   : 4.78 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-16  : CEDAR PARK 2.7 SSW       *   : 4.75 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-178 : ROUND ROCK 3.6 E         *   : 4.60 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-10  : BOERNE 6.0 WSW           *   : 4.55 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-111: BULVERDE 5.5 ENE         *   : 4.53 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-95 : BULVERDE 4.2 ENE         *   : 4.48 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-14  : AUSTIN 2.9 NE(LAMAR&ARPT)*   : 4.45 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-10  : AUSTIN 1.7 NNW(45TH&LP1) *   : 4.35 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-176 : AUSTIN 2.4 N             *   : 4.24 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-02  : AUSTIN 2.8 N(ALLANDALE)  *   : 4.21 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-96  : GEORGETOWN 4.6 NNW       *   : 4.17 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-41  : CEDAR PARK 1.0 ESE       *   : 4.12 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-FR-02  : PEARSALL 7.9 NNW         *   : 4.10 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-115 : GEORGETOWN 7.4 WSW       *   : 4.07 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-12  : BOERNE 4.0 WSW           *   : 4.05 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-14 : HELOTES 1.0 ENE          *   : 4.04 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-183 : CEDAR PARK 3.1 SSW       *   : 4.02 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-78  : GEORGETOWN 8.0 W         *   : 4.01 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-146 : LEANDER 2.2 ESE          *   : 4.01 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-87  : AUSTIN 3.9 NNE           *   : 4.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-FR-10  : PEARSALL 21.1 WNW        *   : 3.96 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-156 : GEORGETOWN 4.9 NW        *   : 3.92 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-28 : LEON VALLEY 1.6 N        *   : 3.88 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-142 : LEANDER 3.4 NNE          *   : 3.85 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-170 : HUTTO 1.4 SW             *   : 3.83 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-24 : BULVERDE 4.3 ESE         *   : 3.81 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-129: TIMBERWOOD PARK 3.0 SW   *   : 3.80 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-57  : AUSTIN 3.3 N(LP1&FARWST) *   : 3.80 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-175 : GEORGETOWN 6.7 NW        *   : 3.78 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-05  : KENDALIA 5.2 SSW         *   : 3.76 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-192: HELOTES 2.4 NNW          *   : 3.74 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-174: HELOTES 1.3 NE           *   : 3.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-49  : WELLS BRANCH 4.2 S       *   : 3.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-148 : ROUND ROCK 3.0 NE        *   : 3.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-171 : GEORGETOWN 7.3 W         *   : 3.65 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-14  : BRUSHY CREEK 2.3 SW      *   : 3.62 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-55  : ANDERSON MILL 1.1 ENE    *   : 3.61 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-136 : PFLUGERVILLE 4.5 NE      *   : 3.60 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-118 : BRUSHY CREEK 2.3 SW      *   : 3.55 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-15  : KENDALIA 5.4 S           *   : 3.52 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-MDN-36 : HONDO 11.0 E             *   : 3.51 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-152 : AUSTIN 0.8 WSW           *   : 3.48 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-98  : CEDAR PARK 3.0 S         *   : 3.46 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-253: CASTLE HILLS 1.9 NE      *   : 3.45 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-39  : ROUND ROCK 1.0 S         *   : 3.45 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-135 : GEORGETOWN 8.9 E         *   : 3.41 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-163: LEON VALLEY 1.9 WNW      *   : 3.36 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-163 : PFLUGERVILLE 2.5 NNE     *   : 3.35 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-162 : LIBERTY HILL 1.2 N       *   : 3.35 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-95 : HELOTES 3.7 SSE          *   : 3.29 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-08  : TAYLOR 0.9 NNW           *   : 3.28 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-74  : GEORGETOWN 3.0 ESE       *   : 3.25 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-143: ALAMO HEIGHTS 0.7 NNW    *   : 3.19 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-43  : PFLUGERVILLE 2.6 N       *   : 3.15 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-176: SAN ANTONIO 5.4 SW       *   : 3.12 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-49  : FREDERICKSBURG 8.0 WNW   *   : 3.12 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-27  : BOERNE 8.8 NE            *   : 3.10 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-60  : BOERNE 8.4 ENE           *   : 3.10 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-61  : ANDERSON MILL 1.4 NW     *   : 3.09 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-44  : JOLLYVILLE 1.2 WNW       *   : 3.08 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-94  : BOERNE 7.8 NE            *   : 3.05 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-208 : PFLUGERVILLE 3.3 E       *   : 3.04 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-56 : DRIFTWOOD 2.8 NNW        *   : 3.03 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-22  : LIBERTY HILL 0.6 NNW     *   : 3.03 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-102 : ROUND ROCK 3.4 E         *   : 3.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-110 : LIBERTY HILL 4.3 ENE     *   : 3.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BND-44 : PIPE CREEK 3.5 NNW       *   : 2.95 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-146: FAIR OAKS RANCH 0.4 WSW  *   : 2.95 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-176 : GEORGETOWN 6.1 NNW       *   : 2.94 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-61 : BASTROP 7.6 N            *   : 2.93 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-49 : MCDADE 4.6 SSW           *   : 2.92 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-MDN-03 : HONDO 8.7 E              *   : 2.89 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-35  : PFLUGERVILLE 0.6 ENE     *   : 2.89 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-24  : BOERNE 2.0 WNW           *   : 2.85 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-27 : SCENIC OAKS 0.8 SW       *   : 2.84 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-44 : ELGIN 0.9 NW             *   : 2.83 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-145 : AUSTIN 12.7 NNW          *   : 2.83 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-30  : ANDERSON MILL 2.2 S      *   : 2.81 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-76  : PFLUGERVILLE 1.0 SSW     *   : 2.81 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-169 : ROUND ROCK 2.2 W         *   : 2.80 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-11  : GEORGETOWN 0.5 N         *   : 2.79 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-MDN-18 : HONDO 8.8 E              *   : 2.78 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-126 : AUSTIN 10.7 N            *   : 2.72 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-22  : BOERNE 4.7 WNW           *   : 2.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-75  : JOLLYVILLE 2.1 SSW       *   : 2.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-76  : THRALL 10.8 SSE          *   : 2.69 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-123 : AUSTIN 10.5 N            *   : 2.68 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-100: DRIFTWOOD 2.4 NNW        *   : 2.65 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-68  : JOLLYVILLE 1.6 SSE       *   : 2.65 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-150 : AUSTIN 4.5 NNE           *   : 2.65 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-35  : BERTRAM 6.4 ESE          *   : 2.65 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-212 : AUSTIN 8.5 NNW           *   : 2.61 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-75 : CIRCLE D-KC ESTATES 0.9 S*   : 2.60 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-95  : BOERNE 2.2 WNW           *   : 2.60 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-197 : LEANDER 4.4 WSW          *   : 2.60 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KY-03  : BRACKETTVILLE 0.1 NE     *   : 2.59 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-86  : AUSTIN 4.7 NNE           *   : 2.57 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BND-43 : BANDERA 7.4 ENE          *   : 2.56 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-38 : HELOTES 4.5 WSW          *   : 2.55 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-161 : TAYLOR 2.4 S             *   : 2.54 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-31 : CHINA GROVE 4.6 WSW      *   : 2.53 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-17  : TAYLOR 8.5 SE            *   : 2.53 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-212: HOLLYWOOD PARK 2.0 NW    *   : 2.52 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-73  : FAIR OAKS RANCH 1.8 NW   *   : 2.52 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-01  : AUSTIN 10.0 NNW(GRTHILLS)*   : 2.50 / 0.0 /  0.0 / 0.00

TX-WM-04  : GEORGETOWN 1.3 WNW       *   : 2.50 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LE-12  : LEXINGTON 2.7 SSE        *   : 2.49 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-219 : AUSTIN 7.9 N             *   : 2.47 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-70  : ROUND ROCK 1.8 SW        *   : 2.46 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-188: SAN ANTONIO 5.1 W        *   : 2.45 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-52  : BOERNE 2.1 WNW           *   : 2.45 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-273: BLOSSOM PARK 0.1 ESE     *   : 2.44 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-01  : GEORGETOWN 1.2 W         *   : 2.44 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-119 : BARTLETT 5.0 W           *   : 2.43 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-179 : GEORGETOWN 1.5 WNW       *   : 2.39 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-270: BOERNE 7.2 SE            *   : 2.36 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-08  : FAIR OAKS RANCH 2.2 NNW  *   : 2.36 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-68  : GEORGETOWN 4.5 SSE       *   : 2.36 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-71  : GEORGETOWN 5.8 SE        *   : 2.36 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-14  : FAIR OAKS RANCH 2.2 NNW  *   : 2.33 / 0.0 /  0.0 / 0.00

TX-BXR-121: SAN ANTONIO 3.0 S        *   : 2.33 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-07  : FAIR OAKS RANCH 10.0 NNE *   : 2.32 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-211 : AUSTIN 8.0 N(BULLRUN)    *   : 2.32 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-31  : FREDERICKSBURG 9.1 WSW   *   : 2.31 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-46  : FREDERICKSBURG 9.1 WSW   *   : 2.30 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-60 : DRIFTWOOD 5.0 S          *   : 2.30 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LE-05  : LEXINGTON 6.7 S          *   : 2.30 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-152 : CEDAR PARK 4.6 E         *   : 2.30 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-75 : SHAVANO PARK 1.1 W       *   : 2.29 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-65 : HOLLYWOOD PARK 5.2 NE    *   : 2.25 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-55 : MOUNTAIN CITY 6.7 WNW    *   : 2.24 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-56  : BOERNE 10.5 ENE          *   : 2.22 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-83  : MANOR 5.1 SSE            *   : 2.20 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-MDN-41 : D’HANIS 2.4 NNE          *   : 2.18 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-09  : WEST LAKE HILLS 2.4 NNW  *   : 2.15 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-65  : BOERNE 1.2 E             *   : 2.12 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-MDN-25 : RIO MEDINA 5.5 NNW       *   : 2.12 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-218: CASTLE HILLS 0.7 NW      *   : 2.10 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-214 : AUSTIN 9.6 WNW           *   : 2.10 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-48 : CANYON LAKE 8.1 NW       *   : 2.08 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-59  : BOERNE 13.7 NE           *   : 2.08 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LE-13  : LEXINGTON 8.8 SW         *   : 2.08 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-MDN-27 : MICO 5.0 E               *   : 2.08 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-104 : GEORGETOWN 1.6 W         *   : 2.08 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-117 : AUSTIN 5.9 NW            *   : 2.05 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-211: SHAVANO PARK 3.4 SW      *   : 2.04 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-83 : PAIGE 4.6 SW             *   : 2.02 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LE-15  : LEXINGTON 2.3 SSW        *   : 2.02 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-61  : JONESTOWN 0.8 NE         *   : 2.01 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-27  : LEANDER 1.9 WSW          *   : 2.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-02 : ELGIN 4.4 SSE            *   : 1.93 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-264: ATASCOSA 2.3 NE          *   : 1.92 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM

TX-MDN-23 : DEVINE 0.4 S             *   : 1.92 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-215: HOLLYWOOD PARK 4.5 NE    *   : 1.91 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-21 : HOLLYWOOD PARK 1.8 N     *   : 1.90 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-198 : AUSTIN 4.0 SSE           *   : 1.90 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-48  : THRALL 10.5 SSE          *   : 1.86 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-AT-21  : JOURDANTON 5.2 NNW       *   : 1.85 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-75 : BERTRAM 3.7 SE           *   : 1.84 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-MDN-10 : MICO 6.4 WSW             *   : 1.84 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-01 : ELGIN 3.5 NNE            *   : 1.78 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KY-04  : BRACKETTVILLE 0.8 S      *   : 1.78 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WO-28  : FLORESVILLE 8.9 WNW      *   : 1.74 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-03  : HARPER 10.1 SSE          *   : 1.71 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-138: LEON VALLEY 2.8 W        *   : 1.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-130: BOERNE 10.4 E            *   : 1.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-46 : BASTROP 4.9 NE           *   : 1.68 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-30 : KYLE 1.1 SSE             *   : 1.68 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-135: TERRELL HILLS 1.0 NE     *   : 1.67 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-78 : BASTROP 4.7 NE           *   : 1.66 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-MDN-16 : CASTROVILLE 4.0 SW       *   : 1.64 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-42 : BASTROP 5.7 NE           *   : 1.62 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-AT-25  : PLEASANTON 9.1 NE        *   : 1.60 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-184: SAN ANTONIO 8.0 NNW      *   : 1.60 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-53  : BOERNE 10.6 NE           *   : 1.60 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WO-10  : ELMENDORF 5.6 ENE        *   : 1.60 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-30  : INGRAM 10.2 NW           *   : 1.59 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-124 : LIBERTY HILL 4.7 W       *   : 1.59 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-26  : GEORGETOWN 4.7 NNE       *   : 1.58 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-86 : BASTROP 5.1 NE           *   : 1.55 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-48 : HOLLYWOOD PARK 1.7 ESE   *   : 1.55 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WO-39  : FLORESVILLE 9.4 NW       *   : 1.51 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-AT-28  : LYTLE 2.0 SSE            *   : 1.50 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KY-18  : BRACKETTVILLE 2.0 SSW    *   : 1.50 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BND-29 : BANDERA 4.7 NE           *   : 1.49 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-MDN-33 : HONDO 3.4 S              *   : 1.48 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WO-45  : LA VERNIA 3.6 SSW        *   : 1.47 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-90 : WIMBERLEY 5.3 N          *   : 1.46 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-AT-05  : JOURDANTON 6.0 SSW       *   : 1.45 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-01  : INGRAM 14.2 NW           *   : 1.44 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-MDN-44 : NATALIA 5.4 SSE          *   : 1.44 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-171 : AUSTIN 3.7 SSW           *   : 1.44 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-AT-18  : PLEASANTON 0.4 E         *   : 1.43 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-51 : SPRING BRANCH 2.4 SW     *   : 1.42 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-217 : TANGLEWOOD FOREST 2.7 E  *   : 1.42 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WO-34  : POTH 0.6 SSE             *   : 1.42 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-205: CONVERSE 1.6 NW          *   : 1.41 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-88 : MCDADE 1.4 NNE           *   : 1.38 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-AT-26  : POTEET 4.9 W             *   : 1.34 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-86 : KYLE 2.0 SE              *   : 1.34 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-116: KYLE 2.5 NW              *   : 1.34 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-ED-24  : ROCKSPRINGS 18.4 WNW     *   : 1.32 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-92 : KYLE 2.5 NW              *   : 1.32 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-58 : CEDAR CREEK 5.9 N        *   : 1.31 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-19 : SAN MARCOS 2.9 WNW       *   : 1.31 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-32 : HOLLYWOOD PARK 4.4 E     *   : 1.30 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-180: LEON SPRINGS 2.6 N       *   : 1.30 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-25 : GARDEN RIDGE 1.8 WNW     *   : 1.29 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-71  : BOERNE 6.5 N             *   : 1.29 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-111 : AUSTIN 10.8 WSW          *   : 1.28 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-122 : AUSTIN 5.6 WSW           *   : 1.28 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-155 : AUSTIN 4.6 SSW           *   : 1.27 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WO-05  : FLORESVILLE 8.1 NNW      *   : 1.27 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-60 : BRIGGS 3.9 NNE           *   : 1.25 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-66 : ELGIN 11.5 SW            *   : 1.25 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-241: LIVE OAK 4.6 WNW         *   : 1.25 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-160 : ROLLINGWOOD 2.8 SW       *   : 1.25 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WO-29  : FLORESVILLE 0.7 S        *   : 1.24 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-50  : SISTERDALE 1.7 SE        *   : 1.23 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WO-27  : FLORESVILLE 0.7 SW       *   : 1.23 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-MDN-28 : NATALIA 0.4 NE           *   : 1.22 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-AT-01  : POTEET 4.1 ENE           *   : 1.20 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-279: LIVE OAK 0.8 SSW         *   : 1.20 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-AT-38  : JOURDANTON 0.6 NW        *   : 1.18 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-FY-02  : ROUND TOP 0.2 W          *   : 1.18 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-59  : TANGLEWOOD FOREST 0.6 NE *   : 1.17 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-165 : AUSTIN 5.7 SSW           *   : 1.16 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BND-38 : PIPE CREEK 3.4 SW        *   : 1.12 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-87 : BASTROP 6.2 W            *   : 1.12 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-221: SELMA 3.9 WNW            *   : 1.11 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-14  : NEW BERLIN 6.7 SE        *   : 1.10 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BND-08 : PIPE CREEK 3.0 NW        *   : 1.07 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-41  : SCHERTZ 2.0 NNW          *   : 1.07 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-45  : HARPER 6.5 SW            *   : 1.07 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-125 : MANOR 5.5 SSE            *   : 1.06 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-48  : HARPER 3.2 W             *   : 1.05 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-58  : ANDICE 1.6 SW            *   : 1.05 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-77  : BOERNE 5.3 N             *   : 1.03 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-69 : CEDAR CREEK 1.0 ENE      *   : 1.01 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BND-24 : PIPE CREEK 4.9 SSW       *   : 1.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-48 : BURNET 3.7 N             *   : 1.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-21 : SAN MARCOS 7.1 W         *   : 1.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-164 : AUSTIN 4.1 SW            *   : 1.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-117: KYLE 7.8 ENE             *   : 0.98 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KY-07  : BRACKETTVILLE 2.0 W      *   : 0.98 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-113 : AUSTIN 7.3 SW            *   : 0.98 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-20  : HARPER 3.3 WSW           *   : 0.97 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-33 : OATMEAL 1.7 WNW          *   : 0.95 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-73 : BERTRAM 5.3 N            *   : 0.95 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-20 : CANYON LAKE 9.2 W        *   : 0.95 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-45  : BOERNE 3.4 N             *   : 0.95 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-136: LACKLAND AFB 7.8 WNW     *   : 0.94 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-MDN-21 : D’HANIS 3.5 WSW          *   : 0.93 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-07 : SPRING BRANCH 4.0 SSE    *   : 0.92 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-FY-30  : LA GRANGE 7.8 NNE        *   : 0.88 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-FY-33  : FAYETTEVILLE 1.0 SW      *   : 0.88 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-61 : NEW BRAUNFELS 10.0 W     *   : 0.87 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WO-30  : ADKINS 6.4 SSE           *   : 0.87 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-03  : INGRAM 4.4 NW            *   : 0.86 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-02 : SPRING BRANCH 5.1 SSE    *   : 0.85 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LL-30  : KINGSLAND 1.9 WSW        *   : 0.85 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-112 : AUSTIN 5.7 SSE           *   : 0.85 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-07 : BASTROP 1.2 N            *   : 0.84 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-23  : SEGUIN 1.9 E             *   : 0.84 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BND-30 : BANDERA 6.4 N            *   : 0.82 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-79 : BASTROP 1.5 NW           *   : 0.82 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-73  : SCHERTZ 4.6 NNE          *   : 0.82 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-74 : BASTROP 1.2 N            *   : 0.80 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-218 : ONION CREEK 3.2 ENE      *   : 0.80 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-128: NEW BRAUNFELS 10.0 W     *   : 0.79 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-07  : HARPER 1.4 S             *   : 0.78 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-34  : SUNSET VALLEY 0.7 SE     *   : 0.78 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-60  : TANGLEWOOD FOREST 3.5 NW *   : 0.78 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CLD-30 : LULING 4.4 NNW           *   : 0.77 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-37 : CANYON LAKE 2.8 N        *   : 0.77 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KS-03  : KARNES CITY 12.6 WSW     *   : 0.77 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-17  : MCQUEENEY 3.4 SW         *   : 0.75 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GZ-25  : GONZALES 0.6 S           *   : 0.75 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LL-37  : KINGSLAND 1.4 ESE        *   : 0.75 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-36 : BASTROP 1.0 WNW          *   : 0.74 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-47  : FREDERICKSBURG 4.6 WNW   *   : 0.74 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LL-17  : SUNRISE BEACH VILLAGE 0.5*   : 0.73 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-18  : FREDERICKSBURG 12.2 W    *   : 0.72 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-98 : SAN MARCOS 1.8 NW        *   : 0.72 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-46 : CIBOLO 3.9 N             *   : 0.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-86 : NEW BRAUNFELS 5.2 W      *   : 0.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-104: SPRING BRANCH 5.7 SE     *   : 0.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-53  : NEW BRAUNFELS 2.8 S      *   : 0.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-46  : LAGO VISTA 1.4 SSW       *   : 0.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-54  : SUNSET VALLEY 2.0 SW     *   : 0.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-49 : CANYON LAKE 5.3 SW       *   : 0.69 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-35  : MOUNTAIN HOME 13.1 SW    *   : 0.69 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-80 : NEW BRAUNFELS 6.3 NNE    *   : 0.68 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-07 : DRIPPING SPRINGS 4.3 E   *   : 0.67 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BND-22 : BANDERA 8.6 NNW          *   : 0.65 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-43 : DALE 7.6 N               *   : 0.65 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-68 : BASTROP 2.1 SSW          *   : 0.65 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LL-20  : SUNRISE BEACH VILLAGE 1.1*   : 0.65 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-04  : BOERNE 5.1 NNW           *   : 0.64 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-35 : NEW BRAUNFELS 5.5 WNW    *   : 0.63 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-09 : NEW BRAUNFELS 7.0 NNE    *   : 0.61 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-22 : BURNET 1.9 SE            *   : 0.60 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LL-24  : HORSESHOE BAY 3.1 W      *   : 0.60 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BLC-10 : JOHNSON CITY 2.2 N       *   : 0.58 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BLC-23 : BLANCO 7.2 SE            *   : 0.58 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-04 : NEW BRAUNFELS 2.4 SSW    *   : 0.58 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-79 : NEW BRAUNFELS 5.0 W      *   : 0.58 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-88  : SAN MARCOS 6.6 SSW       *   : 0.58 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-72  : COMFORT 4.5 SE           *   : 0.58 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LL-23  : KINGSLAND 0.5 S          *   : 0.58 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-17 : WYLDWOOD 8.3 SSW         *   : 0.57 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-200 : LAKEWAY 3.5 ENE          *   : 0.57 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-12 : CANYON LAKE 2.5 W        *   : 0.55 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-ED-12  : ROCKSPRINGS 8.5 WSW      *   : 0.55 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-56  : SEGUIN 5.0 SSE           *   : 0.55 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GZ-05  : GONZALES 3.8 SW          *   : 0.55 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-50  : INGRAM 3.1 NW            *   : 0.55 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-51 : BERTRAM 8.8 SSW          *   : 0.54 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-ED-02  : ROCKSPRINGS 5.4 NW       *   : 0.54 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-28 : MANCHACA 2.1 ENE         *   : 0.54 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-107: DRIPPING SPRINGS 7.2 E   *   : 0.54 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-13 : HIGHLAND HAVEN 1.3 SW    *   : 0.53 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-39  : HARPER 4.9 N             *   : 0.53 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-59 : AUSTIN 14.7 WSW          *   : 0.53 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-38  : HARPER 5.4 N             *   : 0.52 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-82  : NEW BRAUNFELS 3.1 S      *   : 0.52 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BND-41 : BANDERA 4.0 NNW          *   : 0.51 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-65 : GRANITE SHOALS 0.9 S     *   : 0.51 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-03 : NEW BRAUNFELS 3.1 WNW    *   : 0.51 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-ED-19  : ROCKSPRINGS 17.9 WSW     *   : 0.51 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-56 : BERTRAM 9.1 SSW          *   : 0.50 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LL-19  : HORSESHOE BAY 2.7 W      *   : 0.50 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-134: MARION 6.3 SW            *   : 0.49 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-34  : MCQUEENEY 0.5 ENE        *   : 0.48 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GZ-10  : GONZALES 4.5 SSE         *   : 0.48 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-52  : OAK HILL 1.1 WSW         *   : 0.48 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-81  : COMFORT 2.6 N            *   : 0.47 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-114 : AUSTIN 8.2 WSW           *   : 0.47 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-29 : NEW BRAUNFELS 5.9 NW     *   : 0.46 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-22 : CANYON LAKE 7.2 ESE      *   : 0.45 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-86  : SEGUIN 2.3 NE            *   : 0.45 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-38  : CENTER POINT 2.4 ESE     *   : 0.45 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-05 : NEW BRAUNFELS 2.3 NE     *   : 0.44 / 0.0 /  0.0 / 0.00

TX-GS-28  : WILLOW CITY 4.2 W        *   : 0.44 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GZ-16  : LEESVILLE 4.2 NE         *   : 0.44 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-15  : INGRAM 8.6 WSW           *   : 0.44 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-ZV-15  : CRYSTAL CITY 0.5 ESE     *   : 0.44 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-25  : WILLOW CITY 4.3 W        *   : 0.43 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-132: NEW BRAUNFELS 2.2 ESE    *   : 0.42 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-87  : SEGUIN 5.1 NW            *   : 0.42 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-98 : NEW BRAUNFELS 0.6 W      *   : 0.41 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-DM-02  : CARRIZO SPRINGS 3.0 NNE  *   : 0.41 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-62  : NEW BRAUNFELS 2.4 S      *   : 0.41 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-135 : CREEDMOOR 1.5 NNW        *   : 0.41 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-40 : NEW BRAUNFELS 0.1 ENE    *   : 0.40 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-103: NEW BRAUNFELS 0.5 N      *   : 0.40 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-175 : SAN LEANNA 0.1 SSE       *   : 0.40 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-41 : NEW BRAUNFELS 2.8 NNE    *   : 0.39 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-01 : BURNET 5.4 NNW           *   : 0.38 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CLD-12 : HARWOOD 4.7 NNE          *   : 0.38 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-60 : NEW BRAUNFELS 10.4 NW    *   : 0.38 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-09  : FREDERICKSBURG 1.8 NE    *   : 0.38 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-74 : SAN MARCOS 1.8 SSW       *   : 0.38 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-53 : GRANITE SHOALS 1.6 E     *   : 0.37 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-31  : NEW BRAUNFELS 2.5 SSE    *   : 0.37 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-203 : LOST CREEK 5.1 SW        *   : 0.37 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-115: NEW BRAUNFELS 1.5 NNW    *   : 0.36 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-81 : SMITHVILLE 0.9 E         *   : 0.35 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-141 : LAGO VISTA 1.5 SW        *   : 0.35 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-64  : SEGUIN 7.6 N             *   : 0.34 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KS-10  : RUNGE 0.1 SSW            *   : 0.33 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-36 : SPICEWOOD 2.2 NW         *   : 0.32 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-DW-07  : YOAKUM 6.2 WNW           *   : 0.32 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-03 : WIMBERLEY 4.4 E          *   : 0.32 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LV-04  : SHINER 1.9 E             *   : 0.32 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-54  : CENTER POINT 0.5 SE      *   : 0.31 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-05 : MARBLE FALLS 0.7 NW      *   : 0.30 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-69 : MEADOWLAKES 0.4 NNE      *   : 0.30 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CLD-14 : LULING 6.9 NW            *   : 0.30 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-113: WOODCREEK 0.5 SSW        *   : 0.30 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-64  : INGRAM 0.7 E             *   : 0.30 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-113 : JARRELL 4.4 W            *   : 0.30 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BND-33 : BANDERA 4.0 E            *   : 0.29 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-31 : MARBLE FALLS 5.8 NNW     *   : 0.29 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-55 : MARBLE FALLS 1.4 NE      *   : 0.29 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-63 : MEADOWLAKES 0.2 W        *   : 0.29 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CLD-11 : LULING 7.4 NE            *   : 0.29 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KS-01  : RUNGE 0.7 ENE            *   : 0.29 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BND-23 : BANDERA 3.2 W            *   : 0.28 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-80 : BASTROP 1.7 SE           *   : 0.28 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CLD-29 : LOCKHART 5.2 S           *   : 0.28 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-17 : DRIPPING SPRINGS 8.4 W   *   : 0.28 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-65 : SAN MARCOS 6.3 WSW       *   : 0.28 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LL-07  : HORSESHOE BAY 2.7 S      *   : 0.28 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CLD-33 : LOCKHART 5.4 NNE         *   : 0.27 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-26  : FREDERICKSBURG 11.4 NE   *   : 0.27 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-32  : FREDERICKSBURG 12.4 NE   *   : 0.27 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-54 : WIMBERLEY 5.2 WNW        *   : 0.27 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-99  : BEE CAVE 2.5 ENE         *   : 0.27 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-45 : MARBLE FALLS 1.0 S       *   : 0.26 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LV-06  : SHINER 5.8 ENE           *   : 0.26 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LV-26  : SHINER 4.1 NE            *   : 0.26 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-UV-19  : CAMP WOOD 5.02 SSE       *   : 0.26 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BLC-04 : JOHNSON CITY 7.3 W       *   : 0.25 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BLC-12 : BLANCO 1.8 ESE           *   : 0.25 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-24  : WILLOW CITY 0.1 W        *   : 0.25 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-91 : WIMBERLEY 4.6 WNW        *   : 0.25 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LV-27  : MOULTON 6.9 SE           *   : 0.25 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-199 : BEE CAVE 1.8 NW          *   : 0.25 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BLC-20 : JOHNSON CITY 7.9 WNW     *   : 0.24 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-39 : DRIPPING SPRINGS 3.3 NE  *   : 0.24 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-62 : SPICEWOOD 2.5 ENE        *   : 0.23 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CLD-10 : LOCKHART 5.2 SSE         *   : 0.23 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-FY-32  : FLATONIA 0.4 SW          *   : 0.23 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-37  : FREDERICKSBURG 0.5 SW    *   : 0.23 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-59  : KERRVILLE 3.5 NW         *   : 0.23 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-58 : BURNET 5.7 WSW           *   : 0.22 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CLD-27 : LOCKHART 4.3 NW          *   : 0.22 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-68  : KERRVILLE 1.9 NE         *   : 0.22 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-06 : SPICEWOOD 4.4 NW         *   : 0.21 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-81 : BURNET 2.8 WNW           *   : 0.21 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-24 : ROSANKY 4.5 N            *   : 0.20 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CLD-15 : MAXWELL 1.5 NE           *   : 0.20 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-35 : DRIPPING SPRINGS 2.8 NNW *   : 0.20 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-49 : DRIPPING SPRINGS 6.2 WSW *   : 0.20 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-36  : INGRAM 5.9 WSW           *   : 0.20 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LV-25  : HALLETTSVILLE 4.9 E      *   : 0.20 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-22  : FREDERICKSBURG 1.3 SE    *   : 0.19 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-20  : KERRVILLE 1.1 SSW        *   : 0.19 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LL-01  : LLANO 9.2 NNW            *   : 0.19 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LV-23  : HALLETTSVILLE 1.6 SSE    *   : 0.19 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-40 : BURNET 6.1 WNW           *   : 0.18 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-34  : FREDERICKSBURG 1.0 SE    *   : 0.18 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-103: DRIPPING SPRINGS 6.0 NNE *   : 0.18 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-11  : HUNT 5.8 WSW             *   : 0.18 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-14 : BUCHANAN DAM 7.3 N       *   : 0.17 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-32 : RED ROCK 5.0 ESE         *   : 0.17 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-FY-36  : LA GRANGE 4.5 SW         *   : 0.17 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-53  : KERRVILLE 2.4 NNW        *   : 0.17 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LL-26  : LLANO 0.5 ESE            *   : 0.17 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-RL-05  : CAMP WOOD 7.3 NE         *   : 0.17 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-18 : DRIPPING SPRINGS 6.1 WNW *   : 0.16 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-RL-08  : LEAKEY 1.5 ENE           *   : 0.16 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-133 : LAKEWAY 2.8 W            *   : 0.16 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-ED-21  : ROCKSPRINGS 6.2 NNE      *   : 0.15 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-63 : DRIPPING SPRINGS 1.7 NW  *   : 0.15 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-80 : DRIPPING SPRINGS 1.4 N   *   : 0.15 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-21  : COMFORT 8.0 NNE          *   : 0.15 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-89  : SISTERDALE 5.7 N         *   : 0.15 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LL-34  : TOW 1.6 NE               *   : 0.15 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-ED-25  : ROCKSPRINGS 6.2 S        *   : 0.14 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-18  : COMFORT 11.5 ENE         *   : 0.14 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-80  : COMFORT 0.9 WSW          *   : 0.14 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-17  : KERRVILLE 4.7 SSE        *   : 0.14 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-63  : KERRVILLE 4.8 WSW        *   : 0.14 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-57  : INGRAM 3.8 W             *   : 0.13 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-77 : BURNET 8.4 WNW           *   : 0.12 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-76  : FREDERICKSBURG 11.6 SSE  *   : 0.12 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-15  : STONEWALL 2.3 ENE        *   : 0.11 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-33  : FREDERICKSBURG 8.3 SSW   *   : 0.11 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-22  : KERRVILLE 2.6 SSW        *   : 0.11 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-65  : COMFORT 4.4 W            *   : 0.11 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-VV-09  : COMSTOCK 29.7 NW         *   : 0.11 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BLC-11 : BLANCO 8.8 ENE           *   : 0.10 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-03 : BUCHANAN DAM 7.4 NNE     *   : 0.10 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-57 : BURNET 10.6 NW           *   : 0.10 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BND-39 : BANDERA 0.2 N            *   : 0.09 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CLD-31 : LOCKHART 4.3 ENE         *   : 0.09 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-ED-26  : ROCKSPRINGS 8.9 SE       *   : 0.09 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-VV-14  : LANGTRY 10.6 W           *   : 0.09 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LV-05  : HALLETTSVILLE 13.4 SE    *   : 0.08 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LV-22  : HALLETTSVILLE 14.8 S     *   : 0.07 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-ED-22  : ROCKSPRINGS 11.8 ENE     *   : 0.04 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LV-02  : HALLETTSVILLE 17.1 SE    *   : 0.04 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-UV-17  : UTOPIA 2.0 W             *   : 0.04 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BND-02 : VANDERPOOL 1.4 SE        *   : 0.03 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CLD-32 : LOCKHART 8.4 ESE         *   : 0.03 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-VV-16  : DEL RIO 7.8 NNW          *   : 0.03 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-DW-05  : CUERO 7.3 SSW            *   : 0.02 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CLD-18 : DALE 7.3 SE              *   :    T /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KY-15  : BRACKETTVILLE 13.8 W     *   : 0.00 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM


The Latest On Super Typhoon Neoguri

July 7th, 2014 at 8:54 am by under Weather

Courtesy of Wunderground.com. Visit for the very latest updates on Super Typhoon Neoguri.

Okinawa is a small, isolated island to the southwest of the southern tip of the Japanese mainland.  Because of its’ small size and the fact it is surrounded by water, Okinawa is a vulnerable target for strong storms.   What is now Super Typhoon Neoguri is churning through the Western Pacific Ocean and at latest check has sustained winds of 150mph (just 2mph shy of what would be considered a Category 5 hurricane in the Atlantic).  Even though current forecasts have it weakening slightly before it gets there, the storm is forecast to brush close to the island and could potentially cause catastrophic damage.  Neoguri could be the most powerful storm to hit the small island in 15 years.

Here is the latest discussion (scientific) on the Super Typhoon:

6 hour summary and analysis.
   Super Typhoon (STY) 08w (neoguri), located approximately 295 nm 
south of Kadena AB, Okinawa, Japan, has tracked northwestward at 15 
knots over the past six hours. A 070600z SSMI microwave image 
reveals sty neoguri is undergoing an eyewall replacement cycle. 
Additionally, animated multispectral satellite imagery (msi) depicts 
a nearly annular eyewall has continued to expand under the influence 
of a very favorable environment. The current position is based on 
the msi animation and the microwave image with high confidence. The 
initial intensity of 135 knots is based on the current structure and 
assessment from Dvorak current intensity estimates from all 
reporting agencies. Upper-level analysis indicates the system is 
located in an area of low (05 to 10 knot) vertical wind shear and 
robust radial outflow, as evident in the water vapor imagery. Sty 
08w continues to track along the southwest extension of a deep-
layered subtropical ridge (str) to the north.
3. Forecast reasoning.
   A. There is no change to the forecast philosophy since the 
previous prognostic reasoning message.
   B. Sty 08w will continue to track northwestward over the next 12 
hours before turning northward as the str recedes with the approach 
of a mid-latitude trough from the northwest. By tau 24, sty neoguri 
will crest the ridge and recurve northeastward as a secondary trough 
further weakens the steering str. Due to very favorable 
environmental conditions, further intensification is expected over 
the next 24 hours with a peak of 145 knots. Beyond tau 36, cooling 
sea surface temperatures (sst), increasing vws ahead of the mid-
latitude westerlies, and landfall into Kyushu, Japan, will slowly 
erode the system.
   C. After tau 72, sty neoguri will commence extra-tropical 
transition and accelerate northeastward into the cold baroclinic 
zone. The increased mid-latitude interaction, decreasing SST, and 
land interaction will cause its rapid deterioration for the 
remainder of the forecast period. The available dynamic model 
guidance remains in tight agreement, lending high confidence to the 
jtwc track forecast which is positioned close to the multi-model 
consensus.


Storm Track Statistics

Date Time Lat Lon Wind (mph) Pressure Storm Type
Jul 03 00 GMT 8.9 146.8 30 -999 Tropical Depression
Jul 03 06 GMT 9.7 144.7 35 -999 Tropical Depression
Jul 03 12 GMT 10.8 143.9 35 -999 Tropical Depression
Jul 03 18 GMT 11.5 143.3 40 -999 Tropical Storm
Jul 04 00 GMT 12.5 142.2 50 -999 Tropical Storm
Jul 04 06 GMT 13.1 141.4 65 -999 Tropical Storm
Jul 04 12 GMT 13.7 140.4 70 -999 Tropical Storm
Jul 04 18 GMT 14.6 139.1 75 -999 Typhoon
Jul 05 00 GMT 15.3 138.2 105 -999 Typhoon
Jul 05 06 GMT 16.0 137.0 135 -999 Typhoon
Jul 05 12 GMT 16.7 135.8 135 -999 Typhoon
Jul 05 18 GMT 17.4 134.5 140 -999 Typhoon
Jul 06 00 GMT 18.0 132.9 140 -999 Typhoon
Jul 06 06 GMT 18.5 131.4 140 -999 Typhoon
Jul 06 12 GMT 18.9 130.3 140 -999 Typhoon
Jul 06 18 GMT 19.7 129.1 150 -999 Super Typhoon
Jul 07 00 GMT 20.4 128.2 155 -999 Super Typhoon
Jul 07 06 GMT 21.6 127.3 155 -999 Super Typhoon

 

Latest sustained winds from STY Neogury: 155mph.

Here are details from the Saffir-Simpson scale.   The storm’s category, and associated winds are compared to the damage that occurs during storms of this strength.

4
(major)
130-156 mph
113-136 kt
209-251 km/h

 

 

 

Catastrophic damage will occur: Well-built framed homes can sustain severe damage with loss of most of the roof structure and/or some exterior walls. Most trees will be snapped or uprooted and power poles downed. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.
5
(major)
157 mph or higher
137 kt or higher
252 km/h or higher
Catastrophic damage will occur: A high percentage of framed homes will be destroyed, with total roof failure and wall collapse. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last for weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.

Forecast map for Super Typhoon Neoguri courtesy of wunderground.com.

 


NWS Lightning Safety Awareness Week

June 23rd, 2014 at 8:09 am by under Weather

For 20x the amount of info that you’ll find here, plus cool animations to help you learn, jump onto the National Weather Service’s Lightning Awareness Week page  for everything lightning/safety related!  Here is just a snip it of what you can expect!

0 FDAY 1

How Lightning Forms

Lightning is a giant spark of electricity in the atmosphere or between the atmosphere and the ground. In the initial stages of development, air acts as an insulator between the positive and negative charges in the cloud and between the cloud and the ground; however, when the differences in charges becomes too great, this insulating capacity of the air breaks down and there is a rapid discharge of electricity that we know as lightning.

Lightning can occur between opposite charges within the thunderstorm cloud (Intra Cloud Lightning) or between opposite charges in the cloud and on the ground (Cloud-To-Ground Lightning). Cloud-to-ground lightning is divided two different types of flashes depending on the charge in the cloud where the lightning originates.

Thunder

Thunder is the sound made by a flash of lightning. As lightning passes through the air it heats the air quickly. This causes the air to expand rapidly and creates the sound wave we hear as thunder. Normally, you can hear thunder about 10 miles from a lightning strike. Since lightning can strike outward 10 miles from a thunderstorm, if you hear thunder, you are likely within striking distance from the storm.

How Hot is Lightning?

It depends what the lightning is passing through. As lightning passes through air, it can heat the air to 50,000 degrees Fahrenheit (about 5 times hotter than the surface of the sun).

 

BLANK

 

How Far Away Was That Lightning?The sound of thunder travels about a mile every 5 seconds. If you count the seconds between the flash of lightning and the crack of thunder and divided by 5, you get the number of miles away from you (10 seconds is 2 miles).

 

BLANK

Lightning: What You Need to Know

  • NO PLACE outside is safe when thunderstorms are in the area!!
  • If you hear thunder, lightning is close enough to strike you.
  • When you hear thunder, immediately move to safe shelter: a substantial building with electricity or plumbing or an enclosed, metal-topped vehicle with windows up.
  • Stay in safe shelter at least 30 minutes after you hear the last sound of thunder.

Indoor Lightning Safety

  • Stay off corded phones, computers and other electrical equipment that put you in direct contact with electricity.
  • Avoid plumbing, including sinks, baths and faucets.
  • Stay away from windows and doors, and stay off porches.
  • Do not lie on concrete floors, and do not lean against concrete walls.

Last Resort Outdoor Risk Reduction Tips

If you are caught outside with no safe shelter anywhere nearby the following actions mayreduce your risk:

  • Immediately get off elevated areas such as hills, mountain ridges or peaks
  • Never lie flat on the ground
  • Never shelter under an isolated tree
  • Never use a cliff or rocky overhang for shelter
  • Immediately get out and away from ponds, lakes and other bodies of water
  • Stay away from objects that conduct electricity (barbed wire fences, power lines, windmills, etc.)

 

0 FDAY 1

The National Weather Service also debunks some of your favorite lightning myths!  Click HERE to check it out!

Again…. there is SO much more about lightning including statistics, more safety tips, manuals for golf courses and pools, along with a slew of other great resources.  Please, it is for your benefit, so take advantage!!  

 


Climate Prediction Center’s Summer Forecast

June 20th, 2014 at 12:32 pm by under Uncategorized

Summers are always hot in South Central Texas, however, over the past decade, it has been incredibly hot in and around the Austin area.  

The drought has been a  large contributor to the over abundance of heat.  No rain, means dry soil.  As the sun bakes, dry soil means warmer temperatures.  Warmer high temperatures then translates into even more dangerous conditions for the elderly community, especially those who can not afford air conditioning (a good transition into our Summer Fan Drive!).   Today is Fan Fare Friday (read all about it in Jim Spencer’s post below), and if you cant make it out to Threadgill’s to make a donation and take in the fun today, don’t worry!  Donations to help our neighbors stay cool this Summer will be accepted ALL SUMMER!!  

 

So here it is… 

 

CURRENT ATMOSPHERIC AND OCEANIC OBSERVATIONS SUGGEST A TRANSITION FROM 
ENSO-NEUTRAL TO EL NINO CONDITIONS IS UNDERWAY. EL NINO CONDITIONS ARE STILL 
EXPECTED TO BE IN PLACE BY LATE SUMMER OR EARLY FALL, HOWEVER, AND THERE 
CONTINUES TO BE CONSIDERABLE DISAGREEMENT AMONG PREDICTIONS OF THE STRENGTH AND 
DURATION OF THE EVENT. AT THIS POINT, AN EL NINO OF MODERATE STRENGTH IS MOST 
LIKELY. 
 
THE TEMPERATURE OUTLOOK FOR JULY-AUGUST-SEPTEMBER (JAS) 2014 INDICATES ELEVATED 
ODDS OF ABOVE-NORMAL TEMPERATURES IN MOST AREAS ALONG THE WEST COAST. 
ABOVE-NORMAL TEMPERATURES ARE ALSO FAVORED FOR THE SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS, THE 
SOUTHEAST U.S., AND PARTS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC STATES.  BELOW-NORMAL 
TEMPERATURES ARE FAVORED FROM THE NORTHERN ROCKIES TO THE WESTERN GREAT LAKES 
AND UPPER MIDWEST.  THE CHANCES FOR ABOVE-NORMAL TEMPERATURES ARE ENHANCED FOR 
ALASKA. 
 
THE JAS 2014 PRECIPITATION OUTLOOK CALLS FOR ENHANCED PROBABILITIES OF 
BELOW-MEDIAN PRECIPITATION ALONG THE WESTERN COAST OF THE GULF OF MEXICO. 
THERE IS A FAIRLY LARGE REGION OF ELEVATED CHANCES FOR ABOVE-MEDIAN 
PRECIPITATION AMOUNTS FOR MUCH OF THE INTERIOR WEST, FROM PARTS OF THE SOUTHERN 
ROCKIES NORTHWARD TO IDAHO AND SOUTHERN MONTANA. 
 
IN AREAS WHERE THE LIKELIHOODS OF SEASONAL MEAN TEMPERATURES AND SEASONAL 
ACCUMULATED PRECIPITATION AMOUNTS ARE SIMILAR TO CLIMATOLOGICAL PROBABILITIES, 
EQUAL CHANCES (EC) IS SHOWN. 


The Climate Prediction Center's Precipitation Forecast compared to average during the months of July, August, and September.

The Climate Prediction Center’s Precipitation Forecast compared to average during the months of July, August, and September.

Climate Prediction Center's Temperature Outlook for the months July through September.

Climate Prediction Center’s Temperature Outlook for the months July through September.

In conclusion:  Another hot and dry summer may be on the way…..


Severe Weather & Tornado Potential In The Midwest Today

June 3rd, 2014 at 12:15 pm by under Weather

There is a large potential for severe weather in parts of the nation’s mid-section today.  Communities from Northern Nebraska stretching eastbound into Western Illinois will run the risk for strong storms including damaging winds, hail, and a legitimate chance for tornadic activity.   Here are the latest details from the Storm Prediction Center located in Norman, OK.  

moderate risk

 

PUBLIC SEVERE WEATHER OUTLOOK  
   NWS STORM PREDICTION CENTER NORMAN OK
   1146 AM CDT TUE JUN 03 2014

   ...Severe thunderstorms expected over parts of the middle and lower
   Missouri Valley into the middle Mississippi Valley this afternoon
   and tonight...

   * LOCATIONS...
     Southern and western Iowa
     Northern and eastern Nebraska
     Northern Missouri
     West central Illinois
     Extreme northeastern Kansas
     Extreme southeastern South Dakota

   * HAZARDS...
     Widespread damaging winds, some hurricane force
     A few intense tornadoes
     Widespread large hail, some baseball size

   * SUMMARY...
     An outbreak of severe storms is forecast this afternoon through
     tonight from parts of Nebraska through Iowa, northern Missouri,
     and into Illinois. Destructive winds, very large hail, and a few
     intense tornadoes are expected.

   Preparedness actions...

   Review your severe weather safety procedures for the possibility
   of dangerous weather today. Stay tuned to NOAA Weather Radio,
   weather.gov, or other media for watches and warnings. A watch
   means that conditions are favorable for severe thunderstorms
   over the next several hours. If a severe thunderstorm warning is
   issued for your area, move to a place of safety, ideally in an 
   interior room on the lowest floor of a sturdy building.



This system has pushed farther north than the average severe weather outbreak for this time of year.   The same ridge of high pressure that is keeping our weather relatively calm this week is responsible for shoving this storm into the Northern Plains.  On average early June outbreaks occur a bit further south than the one that may potentially occur today.  To follow along with the severe weather possibilities throughout the day check out the SPC’s website: www.spc.noaa.gov

 

probability

 

 

 


Preview Of Weekend Forecast & Memorial Weekend Events

May 22nd, 2014 at 8:59 am by under Weather

We have been keeping a close eye on a storm system that brought severe weather to the greater Denver area yesterday and will deliver the Central Plains and West Texas with a nice dose of Memorial Day weekend rainfall.  I know many of us would love to get on the Lake this weekend under plenty of sunshine, however, those Highland Lakes are dangerously close to their “All Time Record Lows.”  We need rain….. plenty of it…… and right now!!!  According to the LCRA, the Highland Lakes are only 35% full!!  Here is a look and a breakdown of the Memorial Day Weekend forecast.

 

BLANK

Storm juuuuust too far West to deliver ALL of central Texas the potential for rain. Rain will likely stay to the WEST of I-35.

Sunday and Monday Breakdown

Storm moves into North Texas and the Central Plains. This time EVERYONE will see a small chance for showers or an isolated thunderstorm Sunday and Monday.

Soooo…. Small chances for much needed rain return for the entire viewing area starting Sunday afternoon and will return Monday afternoon.  Lets hope most outdoor events wont be washed out!!  Speaking of outdoor events, here are some happenings across the area to enjoy if you do not already have weekend plans.

1.  8th Annual March For Fallen Heroes:

This march will always remind the Austin Community that we have not forgotten the lives that were lost due to war.  I always feel honored having the opportunity to share that moment with all you who make a conscious effort to come out and support a great cause.

The length of the route is approximately 5.76 Miles.

Info At:  http://www.marchforfallenheroes.com/

2.  Austin Vet Together x 2

It’s time for Austin Vets to get together again. It’s short notice and it’s not the 11th – but the 22d, so, twice the fun – get it?
We’re not doing anything fancy but stop in, grab a pint, meet some fellow Vets, and learn a little bit about IAVA and plans for Memorial Day. For some – it can be the pre-Redfest-red-fest.

Info At: Baker Street Pub & Grill 

*** MAKE A NOTE:  Memorial Day Weekend Personal Watercraft Ban on Lake Austin***

3.  Close Assault 1944 – WWII Battle Reenactment and Living History Event

Remember the true meaning of Memorial Day this year. Close Assault 1944 honors the service and sacrifice of America’s veterans by focusing on the history of the 36th Infantry Division during World War II. The free program features reenactors exhibiting the uniforms and equipment worn by the American GI as well as those of his German opponent.The event takes place rain or shine and bleachers will be available for seating. Souvenirs and concessions will be available. Shows at 11 and 2 each day.

IT’S FREE!!

Info At:  WWII Reenactment 

4.  Free Admission To The LBJ Presidential Library

FREE ADMISSION to the LBJ Library on Memorial Day–come experience our interactive exhibits, films, telephone conversations, and “Sixty From the ’60s.” See original lyrics written by Bob Dylan, a Telstar satellite, a dress worn by Jacqueline Kennedy, Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin’s communications headset, a boxing glove worn and signed by Muhammad Ali, and an original Peanuts comic strip – just to name a few of the many cultural icons on display. You’ll also hear a soundtrack of songs from the 60s chosen as the best of that decade by renowned musical artists and the public.

9AM – 5PM

Info At:  http://www.lbjlibrary.org/

5.   Georgetown Memorial Day ceremony.

9:30 a.m. Monday

Guest speaker is U.S. Rep. John Carter, R-Round Rock. Event includes wreath placing and music by the 36th Infantry Division Band of the Texas Army National Guard. Georgetown-Williamson County Veterans Memorial Plaza, 2 Texas Drive, Sun City in Georgetown. www.sctxca.org/suncity/calendar/community-events/index.jsp.

Info At:   Georgetown Memorial Day

6.  Killeen Memorial Day service

 11 a.m. Monday

Hosted by the City of Killeen and VFW Post 9192, features guest speaker Lt. Gen. Donald Campbell.

Central Texas State Veterans Cemetery, 11463 Texas 195, Killeen

Info At:  www.ci.killeen.tx.us


Looking Back: Moore, OK One Year Later

May 20th, 2014 at 6:41 am by under Weather

I’m sure this will be just one of many KXAN Blog posts related to last year’s devastating tornado in Moore, OK.  Even though we are hundreds of miles away, the tragedy left a mark on all of us.  As the F-5 tornado (upgraded days later to a 5) leveled the small Oklahoma town, 24 individuals lost their lives, including children, as the system destroyed a local elementary school.  It is a day that will live in so many memories forever, and even one year later, clean up efforts are still on going.  This morning we take a look back to that unforgettable day and the path since, through the eyes of the Broderick family.  Max and his wife Sheridan survived the deadly storm, and are now rebuilding:

 

radar

(CNN) —Max Broderick remembers exactly what he did a year ago Tuesday. He ran down fences, drove through fields and over curbs to get his family out of the way of the historic tornado that tattered Moore, Oklahoma.

The dark gray monster that killed 24, including 9 children, was in his rear-view mirror, lathing a 17-mile wound into the landscape that was more than a mile wide in places.

Once it was gone, the Brodericks returned to their hometown just south of Oklahoma City.

The whirlwind — an EF5 tornado, the most destructive on the Fujita scale — had sheared houses, schools, businesses into sticks, bricks and shards that lay jumbled and jagged in the straight-line rows of their subdivision streets.

The Brodericks’ home and everything in it was gone, but something else was on Max’s mind — his neighbors who were missing.

He and other survivors ran up and down the street. “If you can hear me, call out,” he cried to anyone who might have been stuck under rubble and still alive.

The damage was so complete that when rescuers moved in, city officials raced to print new street signs to help guide them through the apocalyptic landscape.

 

path

A key home improvement

A year later, it’s tornado season again, and Broderick’s wife Sheridan seems happy about the new addition to their new home, which is still under construction.

“We’re gonna build our storm shelter right here kind of between the second and third cars so we can still get in even if there’s cars here,” she said, as a contractor worked inside the incomplete house.

Storm cellars are all the rage in the neighborhood now.

Other homes-in-progress dot the subdivision, where new houses stand surrounded by threadbare lots. One bald slab sports a rusty storm cellar door — apparently the only thing the tornado left standing there.

Nothing else has been added to that empty foundation.

on ground

The terror was too much for some residents, and they aren’t rebuilding, because they’re not coming back.

Last year’s cyclone injured 353 of them, and Moore is as prime target for twisters, right in the middle of “tornado alley.’

 

 

 

Tornado cat and mouse

Some of them may have recalled the May 1999 tornado that killed dozens in Moore. Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb has said it had the strongest wind speeds of any twister in history.

It was part of a spate of dozens of twisters in tornado alley in just a few days that year.

Or they may remember the 2003 tornado that was less deadly but ripped up buildings.

Or fright may still be in their bones from the tornado that ripped apart another Oklahoma City outlier last year one day before death visited Moore from above.

And trauma might still be fresh on their minds from the perhaps even bigger monster that missed Moore by a hair 11 days after its ravishing — the so-called El Reno tornado on May 31, 2013, that razed mostly sparsely populated countryside.

El Reno was “one of the most powerful tornadoes sampled by mobile radar and also the widest known tornado on record,” the National Weather Service said.

It seems that to live in Moore is to play cat and mouse with deadly storms with heart-rending consequences.

Seven of the nine children killed in last year’s tornado died when it flattened one single school building.

More than 70 students and teachers hunkered down at Plaza Towers Elementary, when the torquing winds pushed walls and ceilings down on top of them.

Plaza Towers had no storm shelter a year ago. That will change when the school is rebuilt.

tornado

Commemorations and a new start

Remaining Moore residents will celebrate their resilience on Tuesday with commemorations that start at 10 a.m. local time (9 a.m. Eastern).

Gov. Mary Fallin and Moore Mayor Glenn Lewis will commemorate the dead, as the local fire department tolls a bell in their honor.

A chaplain will hold a prayer.

Then a shovel will plunge into the dirt for the groundbreaking of the new Moore Medical Center.

A year ago, the tornado tore the old one to pieces and tousled automobiles onto its ruins. Rescuers were forced to take Moore’s injured to other hospitals in the region.

In its place stands a barren empty lot of red earth. Something new will start to take form there on Tuesday.

 

PATH OF THE TORNADO COMPARED TO THE PATH OF THE F-5 TORNADO OF 1999

Moore-OK-tornado-patch-comparison

MOORE COMMUNITY REMEMBRANCE CEREMONY

The website for the City Of Moore, OK has an open invitation posted to today’s remembrance ceremony that begins at 10:00am:

Tuesday, May 20, 2014 – 10:00am

The City of Moore in partnership with Norman Regional Health System invites you to the Moore Community Remembrance Ceremony and Moore Medical Center Groundbreaking event on May 20, 2014.

Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin, Moore city leaders and Health System officials will address progress made since last year’s deadly and devastating tornado.

The program will begin at 10 a.m. by paying tribute to those we lost on May 20, 2013. It will conclude with a groundbreaking of the new health care facility.

We hope you will join us for this ceremony of remembrance and rebuilding.

NOTE: This ceremony will be held on the former Moore Medical Center site. Please park at the Warren Theatre parking lot.

 

City Hall Close up(lowres)


2014 Atlantic Hurricane Season Preview

May 17th, 2014 at 10:28 pm by under Weather

 

hurricane

The 2014 Atlantic Hurricane season is just around the corner,  scheduled to start in roughly 2 weeks.  Every year the “official hurricane season”  kicks off on June 1st and runs through November 30th.   This is the time of year when hurricanes traditionally are most common (hurricanes can, however, form year-round).

Every year a multitude of organizations put out a tropical cyclone season forecast.  From the famous Dr. Grey at Colorado State University to The Weather Channel and many more, each organization takes numerous variables into account to determine whether or not the skies with deliver a below or above average season.  Many of these forecasts will even go as far as giving the number of tropical storms, hurricanes, and major hurricanes (Cat 3+) they expect.  So far, most of the forecasts have been issued.  However considering the head honcho, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association, or NOAA, will issue their forecast Thursday May 22 at 10:00am, we figured we give you a quick and dirty outlook to the 2014 Atlantic season.

2014 Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Name List:

Arthur
Bertha
Cristobal
Dolly
Edouard
Fay
Gonzalo
Hanna
Isaias
Josephine
Kyle
Laura
Marco
Nana
Omar
Paulette
Rene
Sally
Teddy
Vicky
Wilfred

 

Dr. William Gray and Phil Klotzbach of Colorado State University released their 2014 hurricane season predictions in April:

9 named storms

3 hurricanes,

1 major hurricane

Klotzbach said a predicted El Niño is one factor that led to their quiet forecast. El Niño, a climate pattern defined by warmer-than-normal water in the tropical Pacific Ocean, tends to suppress Atlantic hurricanes.  In 1997, during a very strong El Niño, only seven named storms formed, and only three were hurricanes.

 

Accuweather:

converted PNM file

1. AccuWeather.com is predicting a below-normal hurricane season.
2. Tropical development this season may be altered by the onset of El Niño in late summer or fall.
3. Areas from the central and eastern Gulf of Mexico up through the East Coast will be most vulnerable for impacts from a tropical system.

Now we all sit and wait for NOAA……