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Storm Surge Watches & Warnings Next Year

December 15th, 2014 at 8:59 am by under Weather

Over the past few years, members of the First Warning Weather Team have been attending the National Tropical Weather Conference on South Padre Island.   Three days of hearing from the best tropical weather scientists the country has to offer is extremely intriguing, and educational.  Topics range from how information learned from past hurricanes can pertain to today’s systems and their tendencies, to the latest developments the National Hurricane Center is working on.  The NHC is always trying to develop new products to keep you and I as informed as possible when a tropical system is on the way.  It’s all about research, and saving lives.

Two years ago there were rumblings that a few NHC scientists were working on a new product that can help predict storm surge (how far and deep water will rush inland from the coast).  At the time it was in it’s infant stages.  Last year, those rumblings turned into test runs and beta graphics.  Now, about 6 months later, we have word from the NHC, this product will be available to the public starting in 2015!  Here is the press release:

NWS

NOAA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National  Hurricane  Center  To  Issue  Storm  Surge
Watch  And  Warning  Graphic

Beginning with the 2015 hurricane season, NOAA’s National Hurricane Center (NHC) will offer an
experimental storm surge watch/warning graphic to highlight those areas along the Gulf and
Atlantic coasts of the United States that have a significant risk of life-threatening inundation by
storm surge from a tropical cyclone.

The new graphic is designed to introduce the concept of a watch or warning specific to the storm
surge hazard. Storm surge is often the greatest threat to life and property from a tropical cyclone,
and it can occur at different times and at different locations from a storm’s hazardous winds. In
addition, while most coastal residents can remain in their homes and be safe from a tropical
cyclone’s winds, evacuations are generally needed to keep people safe from storm surge. Having
separate warnings for these two hazards should provide emergency managers, the media, and
the general public better guidance on the hazards they face when tropical cyclones threaten.
Here is an example of the new graphic, which will be available on the NHC website
(www.hurricanes.gov):

Storm Surge

 

NHC and NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) Forecast Offices will determine the area most
at risk from life-threatening surge through a collaborative process. In addition to the graphic, the
highlighted areas will be mentioned in Hurricane Local Statements issued by NWS Forecast
Offices in the affected areas and in the Hazards section of the NHC Public Advisory.

Here is a sample surge statement from the Hazards section of a Public Advisory: 

HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND
——————————————
STORM SURGE…The combination of a dangerous storm surge and the tide will cause normally
dry areas near the coast to be flooded by rising waters moving inland from the shoreline. There
is a danger of life-threatening inundation during the next 36 hours along the North Carolina coast
from Cape Fear to Duck…including the Outer Banks, the Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds, and
along adjacent rivers and estuaries. For a depiction of areas at risk, see the new National
Weather Service experimental Storm Surge Watch/Warning Graphic. This is a life-threatening
situation. Persons located within the warning areas should take all necessary actions to protect
life and property from rising water and the potential for other dangerous conditions. Promptly
follow evacuation and other instructions from local officials.

 

The graphic will be experimental for at least two years, during which time comments from users
will be solicited and considered. Only the graphic itself will be available during the experimental
period; the underlying raw data, including shape-files, will not be disseminated.
The new watch/warning graphic complements the experimental Potential Storm Surge Flooding
Map, which debuted during 2014’s Hurricane Arthur. The Potential Storm Surge Flooding Map
shows the geographical areas where inundation from storm surge could occur and how high
above ground the water could potentially reach in those areas, based on the latest official NHC
forecast and its likely errors.

As part of a phased implementation, NHC plans to consolidate the dissemination of wind and
surge watches and warnings in 2016. This new process will merge inland and coastal warning
information for both threats into a single message. After incorporating both user and partner input,
the new storm surge warning system is expected to become fully operational in 2017.

 

Additional information:
-NHC Storm Surge resources website   http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/surge/resources.php

 

 

 


UPDATE – 9:16AM: DENSE FOG SETTING UP

December 8th, 2014 at 8:23 am by under Weather

PLEASE be careful on the roads in our Hill Country neighborhoods.   Fog has been reported to drop visibilities to near zero.  Leave early and take your time on your drive.  Low lying and rural locations will be or big problem spots.  Here is the latest from the National Weather Service:

 

WITH VISIBILITIES DROPPING TO NEAR AT TIMES...SLOW DOWN AND ALLOW
EXTRA TIME TO REACH YOUR DESTINATION. USE YOUR LOW BEAM
HEADLIGHTS...AND PAY SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THOSE AREAS WHERE
CHILDREN MAY BE WAITING AT BUS STOPS OR WALKING OR RIDING THEIR
BIKES ON THE ROAD AS THEY HEAD TO SCHOOL.

THE FOG WILL BEGIN TO BREAK UP AFTER SUNRISE...AND COMPLETELY
DISSIPATE BY 9 AM.

1 SPC

Climate Prediction Center continues El Niño watch with a wet, cold Winter still expected

December 4th, 2014 at 9:13 am by under Weather
AUSTIN (KXAN) -
 
Despite months of anticipation, a long-awaited El Niño atmospheric pattern refuses to fully develop. The Climate Prediction Center announced early Thursday conditions in the equatorial Pacific Ocean and atmosphere have not yet met the criteria for an El Niño.

This is potentially bad news for much of Texas, including the Hill Country and Highland Lakes, still suffering from a years-long drought. El Niño conditions can bring drought busting rainfall during the fall and winter seasons. The good news is that forecasters are still optimistic the pattern will form soon. They increased the odds of an El Niño developing this winter from 58% to 65%.

 An El Niño forms when unusually warm ocean temperatures begin to influence weather patterns.  That connection last developed in Central Texas during the winter of 2009-2010. Since that time, historic drought conditions developed across Texas as two consecutive La Niña cycles (opposite of El Niño) formed.
El Nino impacts
 
The El Niño cycle typically brings Central Texas wetter and colder than normal winters, as the southern jet stream becomes energized when the warming ocean destabilizes the atmosphere above.  Historically, many El Niño seasons have brought wet and stormy weather, producing flooding rains, and at times, filling area lakes. While El Niño-like wetter and colder than normal weather is still forecast for the coming winter, the anticipated influence of the ocean/atmosphere coupling has not yet fully emerged.
 
To officially declare an El Niño, both the ocean temperatures and how the atmosphere reacts to them are critical. For NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center to make that declaration, the sea-surface temperature in an eastern-central segment of the ocean called the Nino 3.4 must be 0.5°C (0.9°F) above normal for at least a month – and be forecasted to last that way for at least three months. But the atmosphere also needs to show those wind shifts, and associated changes in precipitation and convection patterns across the region.
 
If the El Niño develops soon, it will be likely remain in place for the rest of winter into early spring, when it has the biggest impact across the U.S. The most reliable effect of an El Niño (observed in 80 percent of El Niños in the past 100 years) is the wetter-than-normal conditions that affect the southern tier of states, from Southern California through Texas and on to Florida, thanks to a shift in the jet stream. One kink in that connection, though, is that wetter conditions in the Southwest only seem to appear with strong El Niños. If it forms, this El Niño is expected to be a weak event.
 
The term El Niño refers to the large-scale ocean-atmosphere climate phenomenon linked to a periodic warming in sea-surface temperatures across the central and east-central equatorial Pacific (between approximately the date line and 120oW). El Niño represents the warm phase of the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycle, and is sometimes referred to as a Pacific warm episode.
Even though the El Niño hasn’t technically formed, the warmer state of the Pacific is still having some impacts, including having played a part in quashing the Atlantic hurricane season.
 

 

NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center, which is part of the National Weather Service, declares the onset of an El Niño episode when the 3-month average sea-surface temperature departure exceeds 0.5oC in the east-central equatorial Pacific [between 5oN-5oS and 170oW-120oW].

 

The term El Niño (Spanish for “the Christ Child”) was originally used by fishermen along the coasts of Ecuador and Peru to refer to a warm ocean current that typically appears around Christmastime and lasts for several months. Fish are less abundant during these warm intervals, so fishermen often take a break to repair their equipment and spend time with their families. 
NOAA has a list of some state-by-state impacts, but these localized impacts are, of course, less robust statistically than broader regional-scale impacts.
  • La Niña or El Niño Watch: conditions in the equatorial Pacific are favorable for the development of La Niña or El Niño conditions in the next three months. 
  • La Niña or El Niño Advisory:  La Niña or El Niño conditions have developed and are expected to continue.
These watches and advisories are now part of the ENSO Diagnostic Discussion, which is issued by the Climate Prediction Center on the Thursday falling between the 5th and 11th of every month. It is available online
Click here to visit the Climate Prediction Center’s ENSO site: http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/precip/CWlink/MJO/enso.shtml
WINTER PRECIP FX
 
NOAA understands and predicts changes in the Earth’s environment, from the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and conserves and manages our coastal and marine resources.
WINTER TEMP FX

 

Information from NOAA and Climate Central was used in this article.

A Big “Thank You” On Thanksgiving!

November 27th, 2014 at 9:53 am by under Weather

HAPPY THANKSGIVING EVERYONE!!  First and foremost, thank you all for watching, reading, tweeting, and emailing us here in the First Warning Weather Center with your thoughts, pics, and observations throughout the year.  You have no idea how much it helps us, especially during a severe weather event.  So again, we appreciate your input, so keep it coming!!

turkey

Also, a big thank you to everyone who works hard everyday at the NWS Austin/San Antonio office to keep the latest weather information coming.  They are a vital part of our community and have helped save numerous lives in severe weather situations.  Oh, and they do it 24/7/365…. weather never sleeps!

NWS

Lastly, we can’t say enough about the folks at the LCRA.  They keep the data flowing just like we want to keep the water doing the same.  Thanks guys!

LCRA

And to everyone else who assists in getting weather information to the public.  Thank you!

BE SAFE AND ENJOY YOUR THANKSGIVING!

 


Lake Effect Snow Machine

November 19th, 2014 at 11:54 am by under Weather

Ok so by now most of us have heard about the absolutely incredible amount of snow areas around Buffalo, in Western upstate New York has received.  If you haven’t, let’s just say, in the last 72 hours 5 feet has come down in spots with more expected today, tonight, and tomorrow.  Where the heaviest bands of snow reside, neighborhoods may accumulate as much as two additional feet of snow.  

**For the whole story and a MINI verbal explanation of what Lake Effect Snow is and how it works….   CLICK HERE!**

The "wall" of snow that is barrelling toward Buffalo.  Picture taken from well above the storm.

The “wall” of snow that is barrelling toward Buffalo. Picture taken from well above the storm.

 

Here is a brief written explanation of how it forms with a bit more science to it  from the folks at the National Weather Service based out of Buffalo:

The Recipe for Lake-Effect Storms

Lake-effect snow forms in the winter when cold air masses move over warmer lake waters.  As the warm lake water heats the bottom layer of air, lake moisture evaporates into the cold air. Since warm air is lighter and less dense than cold air, it rises and begins to cool. The moisture that evaporates into the air condenses and forms clouds, and snow begins falling.

LE Exp 1

Snow clouds most often form in narrow bands where the size and orientation are determined by the shape of the body of water and the prevailing wind direction. In the most extreme cases, the heaviest bands of snowfall may be 20 to 30 miles wide and extend over 100 miles inland from the lake.

Within the band, snowfall rates may exceed 5 inches an hour and be accompanied by lightning and thunder, a phenomenon known as thundersnow. A band of snow can hover over one location for several hours, dropping several feet of snow; however, 10 to 15 miles on either side of that narrow band skies may be sunny with no snow at all.

LE Exp 2

Lake-effect snows are not confined to the Great Lakes region, although they are most common and heaviest there. Any large body of water can generate lake-effect snow downwind if it remains free of ice. The Great Salt Lake in Utah produces significant lake-effect snow. There’s also bay-effect snow that forms in the same manner as lake-effect snow, only over the ocean. Cape Cod Bay in Massachusetts and Chesapeake Bay in Maryland and Virginia will occasionally produce bay-effect snow.

Additional details from Buffalo….

1.  Here is the LAKE EFFECT SNOW WARNING write-up from the National Weather Service as to what residents in Buffalo can expect:

...LAKE EFFECT SNOW WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM 11 PM THIS
EVENING TO 1 AM EST FRIDAY...

* LOCATIONS...ERIE COUNTY INCLUDING THE BUFFALO METRO AREA.

* TIMING...LATE THIS EVENING THROUGH THURSDAY NIGHT.

* ACCUMULATIONS...ADDITIONAL ACCUMULATIONS OF AROUND 2 FEET IN THE
  MOST PERSISTENT SNOWS. THE HEAVIEST AMOUNTS MAY AGAIN FOCUS ON
  AREAS FROM SOUTH BUFFALO TO THE NEARBY SOUTHERN AND EASTERN
  SUBURBS.

* WINDS...SOUTHWEST 20 TO 30 MPH WITH GUSTS TO 40 MPH PRODUCING
  SIGNIFICANT BLOWING AND DRIFTING SNOW.

* VISIBILITIES...NEAR ZERO AT TIMES.

* IMPACTS...HEAVY LAKE EFFECT SNOW WILL RESULT IN VERY DIFFICULT
  OR NEARLY IMPOSSIBLE TRAVEL AT TIMES IN THE HEAVIEST PORTION OF
  THE BAND. IF YOU MUST TRAVEL DURING THE LAKE EFFECT SNOW...
  EXPECT SEVERE WINTER DRIVING CONDITIONS WITH VERY LOW VISIBILITY
  AND DEEP SNOW COVER ON ROADS. SOME ROADS THAT HAVE BEEN CLEARED
  MAY BECOME IMPASSABLE AGAIN. SNOW LOADS ON BUILDINGS MAY REACH
  CRITICAL LEVELS AND RESULT IN STRUCTURAL FAILURE.

 LE 1 Door

Extras:

What Is “Fetch”:  The distance that an airmass travels over a body of water is called fetch. Because most lakes are irregular in shape, different angular degrees of travel will yield different distances; typically a fetch of at least 100 km (62 mi) is required to produce lake effect precipitation. Generally, the larger the fetch the more precipitation that will be produced. Larger fetches provide the boundary layer with more time to become saturated with water vapor and for heat energy to move from the water to the air. As the air mass reaches the other side of the lake, the engine of rising and cooling water vapor pans itself out in the form of condensation and falls as snow, usually within 40 kilometers (25 miles) of the lake but sometimes up to about 100 miles.

WHY WAS THIS STORM SO POWERFUL:  

1.AS WE FOUND OUT HERE IN CENTRAL TEXAS BY TYING OR BREAKING 4 RECORD LOWS IN THE MATTER OF 8 DAYS, THIS WAS ONE COLLLLLLD ARCTIC AIRMASS.

2. IT’S ONLY NOVEMBER!!!!  -  THIS MEANS THE LAKE TEMPERATURE HASN’T FALLEN VERY MUCH JUST YET, MAKING THE DIFFERENCE IN TEMPERATURE BETWEEN THE AIR PASSING OVER THE LAKE AND THE TEMPERATURE OF THE SURFACE WATER VERY GREAT.  THIS LEADS TO ADDED INSTABILITY.

3.  THE WIND WAS BLOWING IN SUCH A DIRECTION THAT THE FETCH WAS MAXIMIZED.  IT AIR PICKED UP AS MUCH MOISTURE AS IT POSSIBLY COULD BEFORE DUMPING IT ON UPSTATE NEW YORK.  THE AMAZING PART IS…. IT HAS BEEN RELENTLESS.

sat 1

mound 1


Annual Austin Duck Derby Is Saturday

November 14th, 2014 at 12:47 pm by under Weather
2014 Austin Duck Derby
Benefiting the Austin Boys & Girls Club Foundation
 
Saturday, November 15, 2014 at 10:00 am.
Downtown Austin – Ann Richards Bridge (South Congress Bridge)

 

 1BLANK

 

The ducks are coming to Austin! The Austin Duck Derby will feature 10,000 yellow adopted rubber ducks launched into the Lady Bird Lake which will race to the finish line winning prizes for their adopters. Proceeds from every duck adopted benefit the Austin Boys and Girls Club Foundation, a non-profit organization which supports and provides valuable assistance to the Boys and Girls Clubs of the Austin Area which operate 22 clubs. We help over 12,000 kids each year (and over 1,700 each day) grow into healthy, responsible, caring young adults.

Our mission: The Austin Boys and Girls Club Foundation’s purpose is to create an endowment, which will ensure the long-term sustainability of the Boys and Girls Clubs of the Austin Area. Proceeds from the endowment are used to award scholarships to worthy Club members. which in turn ensure the long-term sustainability of our community.

Your duck adoption is an investment in our most vital natural resources: our children.

Prizes include:  A 2014 Volkswagen Jetta, One week stay in Colorado, Gift Certificates, Hotel stays, and more!!

How much:   Attending the event is 100% free!

 

Duck Prices:  

1 duck = $5

6 ducks (quack pack) = $25

12 ducks (quackers dozen) = $50

25 ducks (flock of ducks) = $100

 

Link to the website:  Duck Derby

 


Two record lows broken, in one spot, within a few hours

November 14th, 2014 at 9:55 am by under Weather

QUITE THE RECORD BREAKING STRETCH IN SE TRAVIS COUNTY

RECORD 1

TIME:   November 13, 2014  -  11:53pm 

PLACE:  Austin Bergstrom International Airport

DETAILS:  Just before midnight temperatures dropped to 28 degrees.  This barely managed to break the old record of 31 that was set just last year.

 

RECORD 2

TIME:   November 13, 2014  -  2:38am

PLACE:  Austin Bergstrom International Airport

DETAILS:  Numbers bottomed out for the night at 25 degrees.   The old record of 27, that was also set back in 2013, stood for 365 days.

 

Overview

This is a scenario we do not see very often.  The first record had to beat out lows from the prior morning lows, then dive to record levels, all before midnight.  Then the thermometer had its’ sight set on the second record, and it didn’t take long to get there.  Just  2 hours and 45 minutes after the  record low for the 13th fell, the second went down as well.

1 SPC

 

 


Latest special weather statement from the NWS

November 13th, 2014 at 8:00 am by under Uncategorized
SPECIAL WEATHER STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE AUSTIN/SAN ANTONIO TX
638 AM CST THU NOV 13 2014

...COLD TEMPERATURES CONTINUE THROUGH FRIDAY WITH WIDESPREAD
FREEZE LIKELY TONIGHT INTO FRIDAY MORNING...

WELL BELOW AVERAGE TEMPERATURES WILL CONTINUE TODAY THROUGH FRIDAY.
WIND CHILL VALUES IN THE TEENS TO MID 20S WILL OCCUR THIS MORNING
ACROSS SOUTH-CENTRAL TEXAS. ACTUAL HIGH TEMPERATURES TODAY WILL
ONLY REACH THE UPPER 30S ACROSS THE HILL COUNTRY AND LOW TO MID
40S ELSEWHERE.

CLEARING SKIES AND DECREASING WINDS WILL RESULT IN A VERY COLD
NIGHT TONIGHT...WITH MOST LOCATIONS REACHING THE FREEZING MARK. 
A HARD FREEZE IS EXPECTED ACROSS THE HILL COUNTRY AND SOME LOCATIONS
ALONG THE INTERSTATE 35 CORRIDOR...NORTH OF SAN ANTONIO. THESE
LOCATIONS WILL SEE LOWS DIP INTO THE LOW TO MID 20S...WITH
FREEZING CONDITIONS LASTING 8 TO 12 HOURS...AND 12 TO 16 HOURS
ACROSS THE NORTHERN HILL COUNTRY. ELSEWHERE...LOWS IN THE UPPER
20S TO LOW 30S ARE LIKELY...WITH FREEZING CONDITIONS LASTING
ANYWHERE FROM 2 TO 8 HOURS.

RESIDENTS ACROSS SOUTH-CENTRAL TEXAS...ESPECIALLY IN THE HARD
FREEZE AREA...SHOULD TAKE THE PROPER PRECAUTIONS TO PROTECT
PEOPLE...PETS...PLANTS AND PIPES THAT WILL BE EXPOSED TO THESE
CONDITIONS.

image2

Today Is Texas Winter Weather Awareness Day

November 12th, 2014 at 8:23 am by under Weather

noaassml

austin snow

We couldn’t have written the script better than Mother Nature did this year.  We woke up this morning to easily the coldest temperatures we have seen so far this season, and the chilly Arctic air isn’t going to leave us alone for at least another week or so.   Therefore we couldn’t have had this year’s “Texas Winter Weather Awareness Day” fall on a more appropriate date!!  Here are a few of the best Winter storms can strand motorists traveling northern routes in Texas, sometimes striking South Texas and coastal areas. When winter storms threaten, monitor broadcast media and NOAA Weather Radio for information. Keep your gas tank full to avoid ice in the tank and fuel lines. On icy roads, drive slowly and increase distance required for stopping. Watch for downed trees and power lines across roads. If power is out, treat all intersections as four-way stops.

Emergency Supplies For Vehicle

  • Blankets/sleeping bags and extra clothing, mittens and hat
  • Cell phone, radio, flashlight, extra batteries
  • First-aid kit and pocket knife
  • High calorie, non perishable food, bottled water
  • Sack of sand or cat litter for de-icing roadway
  • Windshield scraper, tool kit, booster cables, tow rope and shovel

Click here for the complete EMERGENCY SUPPLIES KIT CHECKLIST.  This is something you should have in your car, if you are taking a trip during a time that a winter strike is in the forecast.

 

i 35

 

Emergency Tips For Home

If heavy ice on power lines cuts utility service, be extremely careful using generators or gas powered equipment. Carbon monoxide (CO) is invisible, odorless and deadly. It can build up in a matter of minutes. Do not use generators, charcoal grills or gas grills inside the house, garage or enclosed space. Do not try to heat the house using a gas range or oven. Be prepared at home:

  • Battery-powered NOAA Weather Radio, batteries, flashlights, cell phone and chargers, manual can opener
  • One-week supply of food, water, medicine, medical supplies and items for special health care needs, babies and the elderly
  • Pet supplies, kitty litter or sand for de-icing steps and walkways
  • Heating fuel, properly ventilated emergency heating source such as a fireplace, wood stove or space heater
  • Fire extinguisher, smoke detector, carbon monoxide detector
  • Warm clothing and extra blankets

 

For additional winter weather preparedness information, click on:

 

 

KNOW THE TERMS

Know the terms used to describe changing winter weather conditions and what actions to take. These terms can be used to determine the timeline and severity of an approaching storm. (Advisory / Watch / Warning). The NWS also issues advisories and warnings for other winter weather, including blizzards, freezes, wind chill, lake effect snow, and dense fog. Be alert to weather reports and tune in for specific guidance when these conditions develop.

Freezing Rain - Rain that freezes when it hits the ground, creating a coating of ice on roads, walkways, trees and power lines.

icy car

Sleet - Rain that turns to ice pellets before reaching the ground. Sleet also causes moisture on roads to freeze and become slippery.

Wind Chill- Windchill is the temperature it “feels like” when you are outside. The NWS provides a Windchill Chart to show the difference between air temperature and the perceived temperature and the amount of time until frostbite occurs. For more information, visit: www.nws.noaa.gov/om/windchill.

Winter Weather Advisory - Winter weather conditions are expected to cause significant inconveniences and may be hazardous. When caution is used, these situations should not be life threatening. The NWS issues a winter weather advisory when conditions are expected to cause significant inconveniences that may be hazardous. If caution is used, these situations should not be life-threatening.

Winter Storm Watch - A winter storm is possible in your area. Tune in to NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio, or television for more information. The NWS issues a winter storm watch when severe winter conditions, such as heavy snow and/or ice, may affect your area but the location and timing are still uncertain. A winter storm watch is issued 12 to 36 hours in advance of a potential severe storm. Tune in to NOAA Weather Radio, local radio, TV, or other news sources for more information. Monitor alerts, check your emergency supplies, and gather any items you may need if you lose power.

Winter Storm Warning - A winter storm is occurring or will soon occur in your area.

Blizzard Warning - Sustained winds or frequent gusts to 35 miles per hour or greater and considerable amounts of falling or blowing snow (reducing visibility to less than a quarter mile) are expected to prevail for a period of three hours or longer.

Frost/Freeze Warning - Below freezing temperatures are expected.

 


Percent chance for freezing temperatures

November 10th, 2014 at 9:17 am by under Weather

1 SPC

Above is a product released by an arm of the National Weather Service known as The Weather Prediction Center.  It is the percentage chance an area will see freezing temperatures ( at or below 32F) at that time.  We took a screen grab of the best chance we’ll have here in Central Texas for those type of numbers.

2-5 Thurs Details

Notice as we zoom into the KXAN viewing area, which we have highlighted in red, about 75% of our counties are covered.  The best chance, will occur in the Hill Co.  Probabilities on the morning of 11/14 (Friday) will range between 30% and 70%.  Make sure to prepare,bring in, or cover your sensitive plants.  Also, DONT FORGET TO BRING IN YOUR PETS!!!

Here is the SPECIAL WEATHER STATEMENT associated with the cold blast issued by the National Weather Service earlier today.

616 AM CST MON NOV 10 2014

...MUCH COLDER TEMPERATURES TUESDAY THROUGH FRIDAY WITH THE FIRST
FREEZE OF THE SEASON POSSIBLE IN SOME AREAS LATER THIS WEEK...

A STRONG COLD FRONT WILL MOVE THROUGH SOUTH-CENTRAL TEXAS TUESDAY
MORNING. AHEAD OF THE FRONT TODAY...WARM TEMPERATURES IN THE UPPER
70S TO LOW 80S AND A BREEZY SOUTH WIND.

BEHIND THE COLD FRONT...TEMPERATURES WILL FALL TUESDAY AFTERNOON
INTO THE 40S ACROSS THE HILL COUNTRY AND CENTRAL TEXAS AND INTO
THE 50S ACROSS SOUTHERN AREAS. BY WEDNESDAY MORNING TEMPERATURES
WILL DIP INTO THE MID AND UPPER 30S ACROSS THE HILL COUNTRY AND
LOW 40S ELSEWHERE. HIGHS ON WEDNESDAY WILL ONLY BE IN THE LOW TO
MID 50S....WITH IT FEELING EVEN COLDER WITH A BRISK NORTH WIND.

EVEN COLDER TEMPERATURES ARE EXPECTED THURSDAY...WITH LOWS ACROSS
SOME LOCATIONS IN THE NORTHERN HILL COUNTRY POSSIBLY DIPPING TO
THE FREEZING MARK...AND UPPER 30S TO LOW 40S ELSEWHERE. HIGHS ON
THURSDAY WILL RANGE FROM THE MID AND UPPER 40S ACROSS THE HILL
COUNTRY AND CENTRAL TEXAS TO LOW 50S ACROSS SOUTHERN AREAS.

AT THIS TIME...FREEZING TEMPERATURES OF 28 TO 32 DEGREES ARE
EXPECTED FRIDAY MORNING ALONG AND NORTH OF A ROCKSPRINGS TO MEDINA
TO BOERNE TO JOHNSON CITY TO KILLEEN LINE. THERE IS THE
POSSIBILITY OF THIS LINE BEING EXTENDED SLIGHTLY FARTHER SOUTH IN
THE COMING DAYS...AS MODELS HAVE BEEN TRENDING COLDER. SOUTH OF
THE LINE LOW TEMPERATURES IN THE MID 30S TO AROUND 40 ARE
EXPECTED. HIGHS ON FRIDAY WILL ONLY BE IN THE LOW TO MID 50S.

SLIGHTLY WARMER TEMPERATURES ARE EXPECTED OVER THE WEEKEND...ALONG WITH
A SLIGHT CHANCE OF RAIN.