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More Rainfall Totals From Last Night

May 6th, 2015 at 12:47 pm by under Weather
COCORAHS PRECIPITATION SUMMARY
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE AUSTIN/SAN ANTONIO TX
1115 AM CDT WED MAY 06 2015

COCORAHS PRECIPITATION REPORTS
THESE REPORTS ARE CONSIDERED SUPPLEMENTAL AND UNOFFICIAL
VALUES ARE FOR THE PREVIOUS 24 HOURS ENDING AROUND 7 AM LOCAL TIME
:COCORAHS PRECIPITATION REPORTS FOR THE LOCAL AREA

:                                               SNOW   SNOW  WATER  
:                                        PCPN   FALL  DEPTH  EQUIV
:
TX-WM-149 : COUPLAND 6.5 ESE         *   : 7.93 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-WM-48  : THRALL 10.5 SSE          *   : 7.90 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-BST-01 : ELGIN 3.5 NNE            *   : 7.09 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-BST-72 : ELGIN 2.8 NNE            *   : 6.64 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-WM-76  : THRALL 10.8 SSE          *   : 6.22 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-TV-202 : ELGIN 3.8 W              *   : 5.62 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-TV-53  : AUSTIN 4.2 NW(360&PENNEB)*   : 4.96 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-TV-123 : AUSTIN 10.5 N            *   : 4.52 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-TV-117 : AUSTIN 5.9 NW            *   : 4.45 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-TV-87  : AUSTIN 3.9 NNE           *   : 4.30 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-TV-30  : ANDERSON MILL 2.2 S      *   : 4.24 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-TV-145 : AUSTIN 12.7 NNW          *   : 4.21 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-TV-49  : WELLS BRANCH 4.2 S       *   : 4.15 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-TV-212 : AUSTIN 8.5 NNW           *   : 4.12 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-TV-149 : AUSTIN 2.9 NNW           *   : 3.94 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-TV-09  : WEST LAKE HILLS 2.4 NNW  *   : 3.92 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-TV-219 : AUSTIN 7.9 N             *   : 3.89 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-TV-122 : AUSTIN 5.6 WSW           *   : 3.79 /  MM /   MM /   M
TX-TV-208 : PFLUGERVILLE 3.3 E       *   : 3.78 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-TV-150 : AUSTIN 4.5 NNE           *   : 3.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-TV-152 : AUSTIN 0.8 WSW           *   : 3.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-TV-01  : AUSTIN 10.0 NNW(GRTHILLS)*   : 3.70 / 0.0 /  0.0 / 0.00
TX-TV-126 : AUSTIN 10.7 N            *   : 3.67 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-TV-10  : AUSTIN 1.7 NNW(45TH&LP1) *   : 3.65 /  MM /   MM /   MM
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The New GOES Satellite Will Greatly Improve Our View Of Weather Conditions

May 1st, 2015 at 12:41 pm by under Weather

GOES-R, launching in 2016, will provide 1 to 5 minute imagery across the contiguous U.S.  Here is a brief history of the GOES Satellite program, and a more detailed look at what the NOAA and NASA have planned for the GOES_R Satellite. Courtesy of NASA, NOAA, and http://www.goes-r.gov/

GOES SATELLITE HISTORY

GOES History

For nearly 40 years, Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) have provided continuous imagery and data on atmospheric conditions and solar activity (space weather). They have even aided in search and rescue of people in distress. GOES’ data products have led to more accurate and timely weather forecasts and better understanding of long-term climate conditions. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) builds and launches the GOES, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) operates them. (more…)


Austin’s “State of the Air” Report From the American Lung Association

April 29th, 2015 at 2:50 pm by under Weather

Austin Air Quality Improved, Finds American

Lung Association’s 2015 ‘State of the Air’ 

Report

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Strong Improvements for Many Cities, Others Suffer Worst Air Quality Episodes

 

Trend charts and rankings for metropolitan areas and county grades are available at www.StateOfTheAir.org.

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Severe Weather Threat: Thursday and Friday

April 16th, 2015 at 12:43 pm by under Weather

Just as the sticky, humid feel has returned to Central Texas, the chance for severe weather has jumped back into the mix.  This chance is not confined to just today.  In fact, the possiblility of severe weather will come our way Friday afternoon and Saturday afternoon as well.  Current weather models are even expecting Friday’s threat to be the greatest we will see over the three day stretch.  Here are the latest details from the Storm Prediction Center, the National Weather Service, and those of us in the First Warning Weather Center.

Remember…. the KXAN Weather App is a great tool to stay ahead of the severe weather threat.  Interactive Radar, our latest video forecasts, plus real time severe weather alerts, are just a few tools on our app that will help keep you and your family safe.

1 SPC

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Meridian World School Science Day

April 12th, 2015 at 8:35 pm by under Weather
Students

The “Science Team” at the Meridian World School. They were teaching visitors about diseases and the importance of washing your hands. They all designed their own lab coats and had them for sale, with all profits going to charity.

 

We want to tip our caps to the Meridian World School in Round Rock for putting together a wonderful Science Day, on Saturday afternoon.  The KXAN Weather Team was lucky enough to be invited!  There we answered all types of weather questions, along with showing off a real weather balloon, and teaching kids how tornadoes work, with our awesome tornado machine!

Science Day covered all types of fields from robotics, to the anatomy of humans, and animals.  Here are some pictures from the event.  Enjoy!

P.S.  These kids are geniuses, and for anyone “worried” about the future generations…. A few hours with these students would put your worries to rest!!

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Last NWS Austin/San Antonio SKYWARN Training Session

April 10th, 2015 at 8:38 pm by under Weather

The National Weather Service office based out of New Braunfels has been conducting SKYWARN training sessions, throughout the area, since early February.  Tomorrow will be your last opportunity to become an official storm spotter for this severe weather season.  Here are the details if you would like to attend:

 

0 FDAY 1


Tonight’s Severe Weather Chances & SPC’s New Classification System

March 25th, 2015 at 3:26 pm by under Weather

The new models are out, and they are beginning to hint at lower severe weather probabilities for this evening.  We still may see a thunderstorm or two, but the chances of any local storm reaching severe criteria is small.  So, what makes a storm a severe storm?  Well, for the title to be achieved, two of the these three criteria must be met:

1.  Winds 58mph or better

2.  Hail the size of a quarter or bigger (greater than or equal to 1″ in diameter)

3.  Any tornadic activity (funnel cloud/tornado)

 

The Storm Prediction Center

image 1

The Storm Prediction Center (SPC), located in Norman, Oklahoma, is tasked with forecasting the risk of severe thunderstorms and tornadoes across the United States. The agency issues convective outlooks, mesoscale discussions, and watches as a part of this process.

This year, the convective outlook product has taken on a new look, as the SPC decided to expand upon their prediction classification system.  In the past, the threat for severe weather was either labeled slight, moderate, or high.  This severe weather season, you will notice two more classifications;  ENHANCED and MARGINAL.

So, if you see, for example, an enhanced risk area over your community, what does it mean??  Well, here is a breakdown:

image 1

1.  Marginal/dark green risk area –  Includes severe storms of either limited organization and longevity, or very low coverage and marginal intensity.

2.  Slight/yellow risk area – Implies organized severe thunderstorms are expected, but usually in low coverage with varying levels of intensity.

3.  Enhanced/orange risk area – Depicts a greater concentration of organized severe thunderstorms with varying levels of intensity.

4.  Moderate/red risk area - Indicates potential for widespread severe weather with several tornadoes and/or numerous severe thunderstorms, some of which may be intense.

5.  High/magenta risk area - Suggests a severe weather outbreak is expected from either numerous intense and long-track tornadoes, or a long-lived derecho system with hurricane-force wind gusts producing widespread damage.

**The light green area above is labeled “TSTM” for “Thunderstorm.”  This area indicates a 10% or higher probability of thunderstorms forecast during the valid period.**

 

Now that the Spring season is upon us, don’t forget to download our KXAN Severe Weather Guide!!  It’s a great refresher in case you and your family get caught in a severe weather situation.

 


Friday 10PM Update – Flash Flood Potential

March 20th, 2015 at 9:48 pm by under Weather

2-6 Radar


FLASH FLOOD WATCH REMAINS IN EFFECT THROUGH SATURDAY EVENING
A SLOW MOVING COLD FRONT WILL INTERACT WITH A DEEP PLUME OF MOISTURE TO PRODUCE MULTIPLE ROUNDS OF SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS ACROSS SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS THIS AFTERNOON THROUGH SATURDAY EVENING. LOW WATER CROSSINGS AND AREAS PRONE TO FLOODING WILL BE AT RISK OF BEING IMPACTED WITH ROADS POSSIBLY IMPASSABLE IN SOME LOCATIONS. THE HEAVIEST RAINFALL IS EXPECTED THIS AFTERNOON THROUGH SATURDAY MORNING. THE RISK FOR HEAVY RAINFALL AND FLASH FLOODING  WILL DIMINISH SATURDAY EVENING.
DETAILS:

* WIDESPREAD 2 TO 4 INCHES OF RAINFALL WITH ISOLATED TOTALS OF 6
  TO 7 INCHES FROM MULTIPLE ROUNDS OF MODERATE TO HEAVY SHOWERS
  AND THUNDERSTORMS.

* RAPID RUNOFF FROM HEAVY RAINFALL WILL LIKELY RESULT IN FLASH
  FLOODING OF CREEKS AND STREAMS...LOW WATER CROSSINGS...AND
  URBAN AREAS NORMALLY SUBJECT TO FLOODING. RECENT RAINFALL
  ALONG AND EAST OF INTERSTATE 35 OVER THE PAST FEW WEEKS HAS
  LED TO SATURATED SOILS WHICH MAY CAUSE FLASH FLOODING TO OCCUR
  WITH LESS RAINFALL THAN USUAL...POSING AN ELEVATED THREAT TO
  LIFE AND PROPERTY.

WHAT TO DO:

A FLASH FLOOD WATCH MEANS FLASH FLOODING IS POSSIBLE IN OR NEAR
THE WATCH AREA. IF YOU ARE IN THE WATCH AREA...PLAN NOW FOR WHAT
YOU WILL DO IF FLASH FLOODING DEVELOPS. STAY INFORMED AND BE
READY TO ACT IF YOU SEE FLOODING OR IF A FLASH FLOOD WARNING IS
ISSUED.

1 SPC

1 SPC

image 1

image 2


Flash Flood Watch Details

March 19th, 2015 at 9:32 pm by under Weather

1 SPC

911 PM CDT THU MAR 19 2015

...HEAVY RAINFALL LIKELY FRIDAY AFTERNOON THROUGH LATE SATURDAY...

.A SLOW MOVING COLD FRONT WILL INTERACT WITH A DEEP PLUME OF
PACIFIC MOISTURE TO PRODUCE MULTIPLE ROUNDS OF SHOWERS AND
THUNDERSTORMS ACROSS SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS LATE FRIDAY AFTERNOON
THROUGH EARLY SATURDAY EVENING. THE HEAVIEST RAINFALL IS EXPECTED
FRIDAY EVENING THROUGH SATURDAY MORNING AS AN UPPER LEVEL
DISTURBANCE FROM MEXICO PROVIDES ADDITIONAL FORCING ALONG THE
FRONT WHICH WILL BECOME NEARLY STATIONARY OVERNIGHT. DRIER
CONDITIONS WILL MOVE INTO THE AREA LATE SATURDAY AFTERNOON AND
EVENING AS THE UPPER LEVEL DISTURBANCE MOVES OUT OF THE REGION.

THE FLASH FLOOD WATCH CONTINUES

* FROM FRIDAY AFTERNOON THROUGH SATURDAY EVENING

* WIDESPREAD 2 TO 5 INCHES OF RAINFALL WITH ISOLATED TOTALS OF 6
  TO 8 INCHES FROM SLOW MOVING AND TRAINING THUNDERSTORMS.

* RAPID RUNOFF FROM HEAVY RAINFALL WILL LIKELY RESULT IN FLASH
  FLOODING OF CREEKS AND STREAMS...LOW WATER CROSSINGS...AND
  URBAN AREAS NORMALLY SUBJECT TO FLOODING. RECENT RAINFALL
  ALONG AND EAST OF INTERSTATE 35 OVER THE PAST FEW WEEKS HAS
  LED TO SATURATED SOILS WHICH MAY CAUSE FLASH FLOODING TO OCCUR
  WITH LESS RAINFALL THAN USUAL...POSING AN ELEVATED THREAT TO
  LIFE AND PROPERTY.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A FLASH FLOOD WATCH MEANS FLASH FLOODING IS POSSIBLE IN OR NEAR
THE WATCH AREA. IF YOU ARE IN THE WATCH AREA...PLAN NOW FOR WHAT
YOU WILL DO IF FLASH FLOODING DEVELOPS. STAY INFORMED AND BE
READY TO ACT IF YOU SEE FLOODING OR IF A FLASH FLOOD WARNING IS
ISSUED.

1 SPC

image 1

image 2

1 SPC

1 SPC


A New World Snow Record?

March 11th, 2015 at 10:39 pm by under Weather

If this verifies…. Well needless to say… It will be absolutely incredible!!

FROM THE WASHINGTON POST:

Hourly Forecast

 

World record? 100 inches of snow may have clobbered Italy in 18 hours, review pending

 

 

The Italian weather Website MeteoWeb reports that Capracotta, Italy saw 100.8 inches of snow in just 18 hours on Thursday, March 5 — a total that, if verified, would set a new world record for snowfall in a 24-hour period.

However, the reports from Capracotta as this time are not official.

An investigation of the measurement by the World Meteorological Organization would need to be conducted in order for this to go down in the “official” record books, but the WMO does not currently track snowfall for any location. According to Randall Cerveny, WMO’s chief rapporteur ofweather and climate extremes, this is because accurate snowfall measurements are fairly limited, and have been “markedly difficult” to verify.

But there is hope for an investigation of the Italy total. “The WMO is currently evaluating the addition of world snowfall extremes as a new category for the WMO Archive of Weather and Climate Extremes,” said Cerveny. “We will likely be adding it to the Archive in the near future.  When we do so, we certainly will be investigating this interesting report from Italy as a possible record snowfall extreme.”

snow

Snowfall records are notoriously difficult to pin down. Official snowfall measurements in the U.S. involve the use of a “snowboard” — typically just a 16 by 16 inch piece of plywood painted white — which is cleared at the time of each measurement. But even if you use the correct tools, you can still mess up a snow total. “Even making snowfall measurements too oftencan affect the total snowfall value as snow compression is a critical factor in snowfall measurement,” says Cerveny.

The U.S., Canada and Japan have strict snowfall measuring procedures, and reports from these countries have widely been accepted as “world records” by meteorologists, if not officially by the WMO. If Capracotta’s snow total is eventually verified, it would surpass the currently accepted world record by just over 10 inches – 90.6 inches (about 7.5 feet) in Mount Ibuki, Japan, on Feb. 14, 1927.

On April 14-15, 1921, 75.8 inches of snow fell in Silver Lake, Colo., and that measurement still holds the U.S. record for most snow in a 24-hour period.

Even if the WMO does decide to take up snowfall records, it would be quite a while for the investigation to conclude. Investigations include both internal committees, and climatologist and meteorologists from the observing country (in this case, Italy). “Those committees discuss all aspects of the event (such as equipment, monitoring techniques, site location) and then recommend to the WMO chief Rapporteur … whether or not to accept the event as an official world record weather extreme,” said Cerveny. “When that decision is made, we then issue an announcement through the WMO offices in Geneva.”

Hourly Forecast

One recent and notable record investigation by the WMO was the overturning of the world’s hottest temperature — previously 132.8 degrees in El Azizia, Libya in 1922. The committees found that the measurement was erroneous, which elevated Death Valley’s temperature of 129.2 degrees in 1913 to the world record.