Weather

Percent chance for freezing temperatures

November 10th, 2014 at 9:17 am by under Weather

1 SPC

Above is a product released by an arm of the National Weather Service known as The Weather Prediction Center.  It is the percentage chance an area will see freezing temperatures ( at or below 32F) at that time.  We took a screen grab of the best chance we’ll have here in Central Texas for those type of numbers.

2-5 Thurs Details

Notice as we zoom into the KXAN viewing area, which we have highlighted in red, about 75% of our counties are covered.  The best chance, will occur in the Hill Co.  Probabilities on the morning of 11/14 (Friday) will range between 30% and 70%.  Make sure to prepare,bring in, or cover your sensitive plants.  Also, DONT FORGET TO BRING IN YOUR PETS!!!

Here is the SPECIAL WEATHER STATEMENT associated with the cold blast issued by the National Weather Service earlier today.

616 AM CST MON NOV 10 2014

...MUCH COLDER TEMPERATURES TUESDAY THROUGH FRIDAY WITH THE FIRST
FREEZE OF THE SEASON POSSIBLE IN SOME AREAS LATER THIS WEEK...

A STRONG COLD FRONT WILL MOVE THROUGH SOUTH-CENTRAL TEXAS TUESDAY
MORNING. AHEAD OF THE FRONT TODAY...WARM TEMPERATURES IN THE UPPER
70S TO LOW 80S AND A BREEZY SOUTH WIND.

BEHIND THE COLD FRONT...TEMPERATURES WILL FALL TUESDAY AFTERNOON
INTO THE 40S ACROSS THE HILL COUNTRY AND CENTRAL TEXAS AND INTO
THE 50S ACROSS SOUTHERN AREAS. BY WEDNESDAY MORNING TEMPERATURES
WILL DIP INTO THE MID AND UPPER 30S ACROSS THE HILL COUNTRY AND
LOW 40S ELSEWHERE. HIGHS ON WEDNESDAY WILL ONLY BE IN THE LOW TO
MID 50S....WITH IT FEELING EVEN COLDER WITH A BRISK NORTH WIND.

EVEN COLDER TEMPERATURES ARE EXPECTED THURSDAY...WITH LOWS ACROSS
SOME LOCATIONS IN THE NORTHERN HILL COUNTRY POSSIBLY DIPPING TO
THE FREEZING MARK...AND UPPER 30S TO LOW 40S ELSEWHERE. HIGHS ON
THURSDAY WILL RANGE FROM THE MID AND UPPER 40S ACROSS THE HILL
COUNTRY AND CENTRAL TEXAS TO LOW 50S ACROSS SOUTHERN AREAS.

AT THIS TIME...FREEZING TEMPERATURES OF 28 TO 32 DEGREES ARE
EXPECTED FRIDAY MORNING ALONG AND NORTH OF A ROCKSPRINGS TO MEDINA
TO BOERNE TO JOHNSON CITY TO KILLEEN LINE. THERE IS THE
POSSIBILITY OF THIS LINE BEING EXTENDED SLIGHTLY FARTHER SOUTH IN
THE COMING DAYS...AS MODELS HAVE BEEN TRENDING COLDER. SOUTH OF
THE LINE LOW TEMPERATURES IN THE MID 30S TO AROUND 40 ARE
EXPECTED. HIGHS ON FRIDAY WILL ONLY BE IN THE LOW TO MID 50S.

SLIGHTLY WARMER TEMPERATURES ARE EXPECTED OVER THE WEEKEND...ALONG WITH
A SLIGHT CHANCE OF RAIN.

 


Ex-Super Typhoon Nuri “bombs” in the Pacific

November 9th, 2014 at 5:48 pm by under Weather

What was once a 180-mph category 5 “super typhoon” in the Pacific has transitioned into an “extratropical” storm over the Bering Sea near Alaska. But as Dr. Jeff Masters explains, it hasn’t lost much strength:

(wunderground.com)

What was once Category 5 Super Typhoon Nuri bombed into one of the strongest extratropical storms ever observed in the Pacific Ocean, reaching 924 mb at 06 UTC Saturday morning–a pressure rarely achieved by an extratropical storm. Tonight, the storm is bringing 96-mph wind gusts to islands on the southwestern fringes of Alaska.

The only two Pacific storms I am aware of that compare are the October 25 – 26, 1977 storm near Dutch Harbor, Alaska that set Alaska’s all-time low pressure record (925 mb), and a storm from December 24, 1975 that hit 926 mb near 49°N 158°W. Wunderground’s weather historian Christopher C. Burt has all the details in his latest post. Thanks go to wunderblogger Steve Gregory for supplying the images below.


Figure 1. MODIS satellite image of the mighty extratropical storm Ex-Typhoon Nuri became in the Bering Sea on November 8, 2014. Image credit: NASA.

(more…)


Is El Niño slip-slidin’ away?

November 8th, 2014 at 1:39 pm by under Weather
The CPC/IRI ENSO forecast has dropped the likelihood of El Niño again, to 58%, despite the presence of “borderline” El Niño conditions (i.e. warmer equatorial Pacific sea surface temperature, and some reduction in rain over Indonesia). El Niño is still expected, but with less confidence. What is it about this year that may be making it harder to forecast?

Many studies, using both long-term climate model simulations and observed data, have found that ENSO changes on decadal (10-year) or longer timescales.  This low-frequency or interdecadal variability includes changes in ENSO strength (variance) and frequency (how often events re-occur).

In other words, in one decade, the pattern may be weak El Niño events followed by weak La Niña events every other year, and then the next decade the pattern may be just a handful of strong, irregularly spaced events.  These decadal shifts are largely not predictable (Wittenberg et al. 2014; if you’re interested in a lot of technical detail about the interdecadal variability of ENSO, check out the references in that article.)

In an earlier post, I discussed the start times we’ve seen in ENSO events in the past, and mentioned how in the last decade, we’ve seen events starting later in the year than in decades prior. This isn’t the only recent change in the characteristics of ENSO, though, and many scientists think we have seen a shift in low-frequency variability since around the year 2000 (e.g. Yeh et al. 2009, Lee and McPhaden 2010).  These shifts may make ENSO prediction harder for today’s state-of-the-art climate models to predict.

One example of the evidence of a change in ENSO behavior is that El Niño events since 2000 have tended toward the central Pacific flavor, and there have been more frequent, less intense events (Lee and McPhaden 2010, Hu et al. 2013). Along with weaker ENSO, we’ve observed changes in the thermocline, the line that separates the warmer upper ocean and the colder deeper waters (often identified by the depth of the 20°C layer).

The thermocline is now deeper in the western Pacific, and shallower in the eastern Pacific (Fig. 1), which means that colder waters are closer to the surface in the eastern Pacific (Wen et al. 2014).  Yet another change is that winds near the equator are more easterly, indicating a strengthening of the Pacific Walker circulation (e.g. L’Heureux et al., 2013; Sohn et al., 2013).

Thermocline/winds/El Nino schematic

Figure 1: Schematic of average thermocline position and easterly winds, pre-2000 (left) and post-2000 (right). Shading shows average sea surface anomalies during El Niño events in each of the two periods. Figure by climate.gov.

All of these changes affect the development of ENSO, and one implication of the shift in decadal (or longer) variability is that ENSO may be less predictable while this phase interdecadal variability is underway. For example, much of the predictability of ENSO is based on the slow movement of warm Pacific subsurface ocean waters. In the period prior to 2000, anomalies in the warm water volume would occur six or eight months before the start of an ENSO event. Since 2000, this lead time has shrunk to only two or three months (Fig. 2; McPhaden 2012).

WWV and Nino3.4 index

Figure 2: Warm water volume anomalies in the tropical Pacific (green) and Niño3.4 index (purple). Figure by climate.gov from CPC data.

In addition, the shift toward weaker, more centrally located El Niños is more difficult for climate models to capture (e.g. Kirtman et al., 2013; Xue et al. 2013).  The depth of the thermocline, equatorial winds, and sea surface temperatures are inextricably linked–and so the combination of certain factors results in changes in how well ENSO can be predicted.

An illustration of how weaker events are harder to predict is shown by the four “missed” events in the model prediction of the October-December ENSO index: all were weak events that the models thought would be neutral (three of these four have been since 2000). The “false alarm” forecast of 2012 was for a weaker El Niño (Niño3.4 between +0.5 and +1.0°C) that never occurred.  If an El Niño develops this year, it’s likely to be weak.

What is this 58% confidence–still close to 3-in-5 odds–based on, then? Well, surface temperature anomalies are hovering around the +0.5°C threshold, and most of the dynamical models are still calling for increasing Niño3.4 anomalies. As well, another downwelling Kelvin wave has developed (Fig. 3), which will continue to supply the central and eastern Pacific with warmer-than-average sea surface conditions.

The CFSv2 has an unusual forecast (some slight cooling in the Niño3.4 region, then increasing warm anomalies through the spring) that’s difficult to interpret. We’re still not seeing much of an atmospheric response to the surface warming, so there is now concern that if El Niño conditions are achieved, they won’t persist for the five overlapping seasons required for this to be called an El Niño event. So, we’re still calling for the development of El Niño–just with less confidence.

sea surface height anomaly from satellite data

Figure 3: Sea surface height anomalies in early November 2014. Red indicates higher-than-average heights caused by warm waters of the current downwelling Kelvin wave. Figure by NASA/JPL.  

Author: Emily Becker

References

Hu, Zeng-Zhen, Arun Kumar, Hong-Li Ren, Hui Wang, Michelle L’Heureux, and Fei-Fei Jin, 2013: Weakened Interannual Variability in the Tropical Pacific Ocean since 2000. J. Climate26, 2601–2613.

Kirtman, B., J. Infanti, and S. Larson, 2013. The diversity of El Nino in the North American Multi-Model Prediction System. U.S. Clivar Variations, 11, 18-23.

Lee, T. and M. J. McPhaden, 2010: Increasing intensity of El Niño in the central-equatorial Pacific. Geophys. Res. Lett., 37,  doi:10.1029/2010GL044007.

McPhaden, M. 2012: A 21st century shift in the relationship between ENSO SST and warm water volume anomalies. Geophys. Res. Lett., 39,  doi:10.1029/2012GL051826.

Sohn, B. J., S.-W. Yeh, J. Schmetz, and H.-J. Song (2013), Observational evidences of Walker circulation change over the last 30 years contrasting with GCM results, Clim. Dyn., 40, 1721–1732, doi:10.1007/s00382-012-1484-z

Wen, C., A. Kumar, Y. Xue, M. J. McPhaden, 2014: Changes in Tropical Pacific Thermocline Depth and Their Relationship to ENSO after 1999. J. Climate, 27, 7230 – 7249.

Wittenberg, A. T., A. Rosati, T. L. Delworth, G. A. Vecchi, and F. Zeng, 2014: ENSO Modulation: Is It Decadally Predictable? J. Climate, 27, 2667-2681.

Xue, Yan, Mingyue Chen, Arun Kumar, Zeng-Zhen Hu, and Wanqiu Wang, 2013: Prediction Skill and Bias of Tropical Pacific Sea Surface Temperatures in the NCEP Climate Forecast System Version 2. J. Climate, 26, 5358–5378.


48 hour rainfall totals

November 6th, 2014 at 1:31 pm by under Weather
Hundreds more area rainfall totals can be found on our RAINFALL PAGE. 
Rainfall impact on area roads can be found on our LOW WATER CROSSINGS PAGE.

Here is the final map of rainfall that fell over the past two days. Most areas (in orange or darker) received at least 2 inches of rain. There was a swath of rain that extended from San Antonio north into the southern Hill Country where at least 4 to 6 inches of rain was observed. The area outlined in black is the recharge zone for the Edwards Aquifer. Any rain that falls into this region is able to be absorbed into the Aquifer which is the main source of water for many South-Central Texas residents. The aquifer level is up 8 feet from just a week ago!
...48 HOUR RAINFALL REPORTS UP TO 6 AM CST THURSDAY...

LOCATION                       AMOUNT    TIME/DATE

...TEXAS...

...BASTROP...
3 W CEDAR CREEK                2.79 IN   0600 AM 11/06
RED ROCK 1.2 N                 2.52 IN   0504 AM 11/06
CEDAR CREEK BELOW BASTROP      2.39 IN   0600 AM 11/06
6 NNW CAMP SWIFT               2.37 IN   0600 AM 11/06
1 WSW ROSANKY                  2.37 IN   0600 AM 11/06
TOM MILLER DAM                 2.35 IN   0600 AM 11/06
1 NW CAMP SWIFT                2.23 IN   0608 AM 11/06
7 NNE WYLDWOOD                 2.16 IN   0600 AM 11/06
CEDAR CREEK NEAR BASTROP       2.13 IN   0600 AM 11/06
1 WSW BASTROP                  1.73 IN   0600 AM 11/06
SMITHVILLE                     1.16 IN   0610 AM 11/06
ELGIN 0.3 NE                   1.04 IN   1028 PM 11/05
3 WSW CIRCLE D-KC ESTATE       0.85 IN   0600 AM 11/06

...BLANCO...
10 WNW JOHNSON CITY            3.04 IN   0600 AM 11/06
 (more...)

Persistent rainfall will continue flash flood threat

November 5th, 2014 at 2:02 am by under Weather
Click for latest Composite Reflectivity radar image from the Austin/San Antonio, TX radar and current weather warnings

A Flash Flood Watch is in effect for all of South Central Texas through Noon as a cold front and upper level disturbance will interact with ample moisture in place to produce rainfall across the area. most areas will see 2 to 4 inches with isolated totals of 6 to 7 inches possible. Locally Heavy Rainfall will lead to the possibility of flash flooding.
FLOOD WATCH
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE AUSTIN/SAN ANTONIO TX
1050 PM CST TUE NOV 4 2014

...HEAVY RAINFALL AND FLASH FLOODING POSSIBLE ACROSS SOUTH
CENTRAL TEXAS AND THE HILL COUNTRY THROUGH WEDNESDAY MORNING...

.AN UPPER LEVEL STORM SYSTEM AND COLD FRONT IS INTERACTING WITH
UNSEASONABLY HIGH ATMOSPHERIC MOISTURE ENHANCED BY TROPICAL STORM
VANCE WHICH IS BRINGING LOCALLY HEAVY RAINFALL TO SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS
AND THE HILL COUNTRY OVERNIGHT TONIGHT THROUGH WEDNESDAY MORNING.  (more...)

National Weather Service briefing on flooding threat

November 4th, 2014 at 3:41 pm by under Weather


Several inches of rain forecast–Flash Flood Watch issued

November 4th, 2014 at 2:47 pm by under Weather

A flash flood watch is in effect from 6 pm Tuesday night through Noon Wednesday. Deep moist air will combine with a cold front and upper level trough to bring the potential for heavy rain. Widespread totals of two to four inches are likely with isolated amounts up to seven inches. If water covers the road, Turn Around, Don’t Drown!

An upper low and cold front will combine with moisture from the Gulf of Mexico and Pacific to produce widespread rain across the area, mainly Tuesday night and Wednesday. Rainfall will average from 2 to 4 inches, with a few spots receiving up to 7 inches by sunrise Thursday morning.
FLOOD WATCH
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE AUSTIN/SAN ANTONIO TX
322 PM CST TUE NOV 4 2014

...HEAVY RAINFALL AND FLASH FLOODING POSSIBLE ACROSS SOUTH
CENTRAL TEXAS AND THE HILL COUNTRY THIS EVENING THROUGH WEDNESDAY
MORNING...

.AN UPPER LEVEL STORM SYSTEM AND COLD FRONT WILL INTERACT WITH
UNSEASONABLY HIGH ATMOSPHERIC MOISTURE ENHANCED BY TROPICAL STORM
VANCE TO BRING LOCALLY HEAVY RAINFALL TO SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS AND
THE HILL COUNTRY THIS EVENING THROUGH WEDNESDAY MORNING. THE
HEAVIEST RAINS ARE CURRENTLY EXPECTED TO BE ALONG A DEL RIO TO
SAN ANTONIO TO GIDDINGS LINE. RAINFALL AMOUNTS ARE EXPECTED TO BE
HEAVIEST AS THE COLD FRONT MOVES THROUGH OUR AREA. RAINFALL
AMOUNTS WILL DECREASE WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON AS THE FRONT MOVES WELL
SOUTH OF OUR AREA. AVERAGE RAINFALL AMOUNTS OF 2 TO 4 INCHES ARE
EXPECTED WITH ISOLATED AMOUNTS UP TO 7 INCHES POSSIBLE ACROSS THE
WATCH AREA.

FLASH FLOODING REMAINS POSSIBLE IN AREAS WHERE SEVERAL ROUNDS OF
HEAVY RAINFALL OCCUR OVER A SHORT PERIOD OF TIME. IN ADDITION TO
THE THREAT OF FLASH FLOODING...THESE HEAVY RAINS COULD PRODUCE
RAPID RISES IN AREA RIVERS...STREAMS AND NORMALLY DRY CREEKS.

...FLASH FLOOD WATCH REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM 6 PM CST THIS EVENING
THROUGH WEDNESDAY MORNING...

THE FLASH FLOOD WATCH CONTINUES FOR

* THE FOLLOWING COUNTIES IN SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS...ATASCOSA...
  BANDERA...BASTROP...BEXAR...BLANCO...BURNET...CALDWELL...
  COMAL...DEWITT...DIMMIT...EDWARDS...FAYETTE...FRIO...
  GILLESPIE...GONZALES...GUADALUPE...HAYS...KARNES...KENDALL...
  KERR...KINNEY...LAVACA...LEE...LLANO...MAVERICK...MEDINA...
  REAL...TRAVIS...UVALDE...VAL VERDE...WILLIAMSON...WILSON AND
  ZAVALA.

* FROM 6 PM CST THIS EVENING THROUGH WEDNESDAY MORNING

* AVERAGE RAINFALL AMOUNTS OF 2 TO 4 INCHES...WITH ISOLATED
  AMOUNTS UP TO 7 INCHES POSSIBLE ACROSS THE WATCH AREA.

* FLASH FLOODING OF LOW WATER CROSSINGS AND OTHER LOW LYING AND
  NORMALLY FLOOD PRONE AREAS IS LIKELY DUE TO HEAVY RAINS.
  NORMALLY DRY CREEKS AND AREA STREAMS MAY ALSO SEE RAPID RISES.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A FLASH FLOOD WATCH MEANS FLASH FLOODING IS POSSIBLE IN OR NEAR
THE WATCH AREA. IF YOU ARE IN THE WATCH AREA...PLAN NOW FOR WHAT
YOU WILL DO IF FLASH FLOODING DEVELOPS. STAY INFORMED AND BE
READY TO ACT IF YOU SEE FLOODING OR IF A FLASH FLOOD WARNING IS
ISSUED.

&&

Heavy rain expected, Flash Flood Watch issued

November 3rd, 2014 at 7:29 pm by under Weather
11-3 Rain totals from NWS
An upper low and cold front will combine with moisture from the Gulf of Mexico and Pacific to produce widespread rain across the area, mainly Tuesday night and Wednesday. Rainfall will average from 2 to 4 inches, with a few spots receiving up to 7 inches by sunrise Thursday morning. Check the forecast often over the next few days and stay aware of rain and flood conditions.

A flash flood watch is in effect for Tuesday night through Wednesday. Deep moist air will combine with a cold front and upper level trough to bring the potential for heavy rain. Widespread totals of two to four inches are likely with isolated amounts up to seven inches. The main area of concern is along and south if I-35 to San Antonio and south of Highway 90 west of San Antonio.
FLOOD WATCH
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE AUSTIN/SAN ANTONIO TX
357 PM CST MON NOV 3 2014

...HEAVY RAINFALL AND FLASH FLOODING POSSIBLE ACROSS A GOOD
PORTION OF SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS TUESDAY NIGHT THROUGH WEDNESDAY
MORNING...

.AN UPPER LEVEL STORM SYSTEM...COLD FRONT AND INCREASING
MOISTURE FROM THE GULF OF MEXICO AND MOISTURE FROM HURRICANE VANCE
WILL BRING LOCALLY HEAVY RAINFALL TO PORTIONS OF SOUTH CENTRAL
TEXAS LATE TUESDAY EVENING THROUGH WEDNESDAY MORNING. THE HEAVY
RAINFALL IS EXPECTED TO OCCUR GENERALLY ALONG AND EAST OF
INTERSTATE 35...AS WELL AS ALONG AND SOUTH OF U.S. HIGHWAY 90.
RAINFALL AMOUNTS ARE EXPECTED TO BE HIGHEST TUESDAY NIGHT THROUGH
WEDNESDAY MORNING AS A COLD FRONT MOVES THROUGH THE REGION.
RAINFALL AMOUNTS WILL BEGIN TO DECREASE BY WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON AS
THE FRONT MOVES SOUTH OF THE AREA. AVERAGE RAINFALL AMOUNTS OF 2
TO 4 INCHES WITH ISOLATED AMOUNTS UP TO 7 INCHES ARE POSSIBLE
ACROSS THE WATCH AREA.

FLASH FLOODING REMAINS POSSIBLE IN AREAS WHERE SEVERAL ROUNDS OF
HEAVY RAINFALL OCCUR OVER A SHORT PERIOD OF TIME. IN ADDITION TO
THE THREAT OF FLASH FLOODING...THESE HEAVY RAINS COULD PRODUCE
RAPID RISES IN AREA RIVERS...STREAMS AND NORMALLY DRY CREEKS.

ATASCOSA-BASTROP-BEXAR-CALDWELL-COMAL-DEWITT-DIMMIT-FAYETTE-FRIO-
GONZALES-GUADALUPE-HAYS-KARNES-KINNEY-LAVACA-LEE-MAVERICK-MEDINA-
TRAVIS-UVALDE-WILLIAMSON-WILSON-ZAVALA-
INCLUDING THE CITIES OF...PLEASANTON...BASTROP...SAN ANTONIO...
LOCKHART...NEW BRAUNFELS...CUERO...CARRIZO SPRINGS...LA GRANGE...
PEARSALL...GONZALES...SEGUIN...SAN MARCOS...KARNES CITY...
BRACKETTVILLE...HALLETTSVILLE...GIDDINGS...EAGLE PASS...HONDO...
AUSTIN...UVALDE...GEORGETOWN...FLORESVILLE...CRYSTAL CITY
357 PM CST MON NOV 3 2014

...FLASH FLOOD WATCH IN EFFECT FROM LATE TUESDAY NIGHT THROUGH
WEDNESDAY MORNING...

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN AUSTIN/SAN ANTONIO HAS ISSUED A

* FLASH FLOOD WATCH FOR THE FOLLOWING COUNTIES IN SOUTH CENTRAL
  TEXAS...ATASCOSA...BASTROP...BEXAR...CALDWELL...COMAL...
  DEWITT...DIMMIT...FAYETTE...FRIO...GONZALES...GUADALUPE...
  HAYS...KARNES...KINNEY...LAVACA...LEE...MAVERICK...MEDINA...
  TRAVIS...UVALDE...WILLIAMSON...WILSON AND ZAVALA.

* FROM LATE TUESDAY NIGHT THROUGH WEDNESDAY MORNING

* AVERAGE RAINFALL AMOUNTS OF 2 TO 4 INCHES...WITH ISOLATED
  AMOUNTS UP TO 7 INCHES POSSIBLE ACROSS THE WATCH AREA.

* FLASH FLOODING OF LOW WATER CROSSINGS AND OTHER LOW LYING AND
  NORMALLY FLOOD PRONE AREAS IS LIKELY DUE TO HEAVY RAINS.
  NORMALLY DRY CREEKS AND AREA STREAMS MAY ALSO SEE RAPID RISES.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A FLASH FLOOD WATCH MEANS FLASH FLOODING IS POSSIBLE IN OR NEAR
THE WATCH AREA. IF YOU ARE IN THE WATCH AREA...PLAN NOW FOR WHAT
YOU WILL DO IF FLASH FLOODING DEVELOPS. STAY INFORMED AND BE
READY TO ACT IF YOU SEE FLOODING OR IF A FLASH FLOOD WARNING IS
ISSUED.

&&

Flash flood threat increases Tuesday night / Wednesday

November 2nd, 2014 at 5:54 pm by under Weather

excess

 

The map above, issued today by the Hydrometeorological Prediction Center (part of the National Weather Service), shows the probability of “excessive rainfall” Tuesday evening through Wednesday evening. All of Central Texas is in the risk area.

(more…)


U.N. Report: Climate Change Dangers are ‘Higher than Ever’

November 2nd, 2014 at 1:08 pm by under Weather

Pollution and climate change due to human influence is “clear,” and the observed effects are “unprecedented,” according to a report released Sunday by a United Nations panel.

tweets

The 116-page report is the fifth since 1990 prepared by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The latest installment synthesizes the findings of the previous four reports and presents new conclusions that environmental scientists arrived at since the fourth report was released in 2007.

(more…)