2-week rainfall totals

September 20th, 2014 at 9:25 am by under Weather

We’ve enjoyed a much wetter September than average thus far. In fact, parts of Austin have added up as much rain in the past 14 days as we typically would in 3-4 months!

Check out the following 2-week rainfall totals courtesy of the LCRA Hydromet — also available on KXAN.com here.

9-20 hillco

 

9-20 metro

 

9-20 east


NASA Mars spacecraft ready for orbit Sept. 21

September 19th, 2014 at 1:30 pm by under Weather

NASA's MAVEN spacecraft

NASA’s MAVEN spacecraft is quickly approaching Mars on a mission to study its upper atmosphere. When it arrives on September 21, 2014, MAVEN’s winding journey from Earth will culminate with a dramatic engine burn, pulling the spacecraft into an elliptical orbit.

NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) spacecraft is nearing its scheduled Sept. 21 insertion into Martian orbit after completing a 10-month interplanetary journey of 442 million miles (711 million kilometers).

Flight Controllers at Lockheed Martin Space Systems in Littleton, Colorado, will be responsible for the health and safety of the spacecraft throughout the process. The spacecraft’s mission timeline will place the spacecraft in orbit at approximately 6:50 p.m. PDT (9:50 p.m. EDT).

“So far, so good with the performance of the spacecraft and payloads on the cruise to Mars,” said David Mitchell, MAVEN project manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “The team, the flight system, and all ground assets are ready for Mars orbit insertion.”

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Hurricane remnants bring flooding rain to Central Texas

September 19th, 2014 at 9:51 am by under Weather

For the past three days, the remnants of Hurricane Odile have sent periodic rounds of heavy rainfall into Central Texas.

Parts of our area have now seen more rainfall than anywhere in Arizona, New Mexico, or West Texas (areas more directly affected by the ex-hurricane’s circulation).

Check out the rainfall totals below from the past week (courtesy LCRA, also available sorted by which lake the water flows into here) to see if your neighborhood was one of the lucky ones:

9-19 Rain hill co

9-19 rain metro

9-19 rain east

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Hundreds of area rainfall totals

September 18th, 2014 at 1:46 pm by under Weather
While many of the same totals will be included below, area LCRA Hydromet 
rain gauge readings can be found by clicking on our rainfall page.

9-18 Rain map
PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE AUSTIN/SAN ANTONIO TX
1055 AM CDT THU SEP 18 2014

...LATEST 24 HOUR RAINFALL REPORTS...

LOCATION                       AMOUNT    TIME/DATE       LAT/LON

...TEXAS...

...BASTROP...
TOM MILLER DAM                 3.99 IN   1000 AM 09/18   30.29N/97.39W
8 NNE CAMP SWIFT               2.18 IN   0715 AM 09/18   30.30N/97.23W
SMITHVILLE                     1.81 IN   0822 AM 09/18   30.02N/97.15W
5 SE BASTROP                   1.67 IN   0700 AM 09/18   30.05N/97.25W
4 E CIRCLE D-KC ESTATE         1.50 IN   0800 AM 09/18   30.16N/97.16W
2 NNE CAMP SWIFT               1.40 IN   0525 AM 09/18   30.23N/97.28W
SMITHVILLE                     1.40 IN   1027 AM 09/18   30.01N/97.16W
1 NW CAMP SWIFT                1.25 IN   1008 AM 09/18   30.20N/97.30W
1 SE BASTROP                   1.19 IN   0800 AM 09/18   30.10N/97.28W
1 WNW SMITHVILLE               1.17 IN   1046 AM 09/18   30.02N/97.17W
3 NE CAMP SWIFT                1.06 IN   0700 AM 09/18   30.22N/97.26W
CIRCLE D-KC ESTATE             1.00 IN   0800 AM 09/18   30.15N/97.22W
1 WSW BASTROP                  0.97 IN   1045 AM 09/18   30.10N/97.32W
7 NNE WYLDWOOD                 0.91 IN   1028 AM 09/18   30.23N/97.43W
3 WSW CIRCLE D-KC ESTATE       0.91 IN   1026 AM 09/18   30.14N/97.27W
2 NNE ELGIN                    0.83 IN   0800 AM 09/18   30.39N/97.36W
6 NNW CAMP SWIFT               0.73 IN   1025 AM 09/18   30.27N/97.33W
3 NE ELGIN                     0.67 IN   1049 AM 09/18   30.38N/97.35W
2 ESE WYLDWOOD                 0.66 IN   1048 AM 09/18   30.11N/97.43W
6 S CEDAR CREEK                0.65 IN   0611 AM 09/18   30.00N/97.50W
5 WSW CEDAR CREEK              0.64 IN   0700 AM 09/18   30.04N/97.57W
1 NW BASTROP                   0.61 IN   0800 AM 09/18   30.13N/97.32W
CEDAR CREEK BELOW BASTROP      0.49 IN   1026 AM 09/18   30.04N/97.31W
3 W CEDAR CREEK                0.49 IN   1026 AM 09/18   30.08N/97.55W
2 SSW BASTROP                  0.38 IN   0620 AM 09/18   30.08N/97.32W
2 SSE BASTROP                  0.37 IN   1051 AM 09/18   30.08N/97.29W
2 ENE ROSANKY                  0.36 IN   0800 AM 09/18   29.95N/97.26W
1 NE CEDAR CREEK               0.35 IN   0700 AM 09/18   30.09N/97.49W
CEDAR CREEK NEAR BASTROP       0.35 IN   1000 AM 09/18   30.08N/97.39W
8 W ROSANKY                    0.25 IN   1040 AM 09/18   29.95N/97.44W

...BLANCO...
4 N HENLY                      5.38 IN   1050 AM 09/18   30.25N/98.22W
4 SE PEDERNALES FALLS STATE PA 5.19 IN   1027 AM 09/18   30.27N/98.21W
3 WSW PEDERNALES FALLS STATE P 4.93 IN   1025 AM 09/18   30.28N/98.30W
 Read the rest of this entry »

Flash Flood Watch issued

September 18th, 2014 at 1:13 pm by under Weather
FLOOD WATCH
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE AUSTIN/SAN ANTONIO TX
450 AM CDT THU SEP 18 2014

...HEAVY RAINFALL AND FLASH FLOODING POSSIBLE FOR AREAS GENERALLY
ALONG AND NORTH OF HIGHWAY 71 TODAY...

.TROPICAL MOISTURE WILL REMAIN IN PLACE ACROSS PORTIONS OF SOUTH
CENTRAL TEXAS TODAY. IN ADDITION...A SERIES OF UPPER LEVEL
DISTURBANCES SPINNING OFF THE REMNANTS OF TROPICAL CYCLONE ODILE
WILL MOVE TO THE SOUTHEAST ACROSS CENTRAL TEXAS. THIS COMBINATION
WILL RESULT IN SCATTERED TO NUMEROUS SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS
TODAY. AVERAGE RAINFALL AMOUNTS OF 1 TO 2 INCHES ARE EXPECTED WITH
ISOLATED AMOUNTS OF 3 TO 5 INCHES POSSIBLE. FLASH FLOODING REMAINS
POSSIBLE IN AREAS WHERE SEVERAL ROUNDS OF HEAVY RAINFALL OCCUR AND
DUE TO SATURATED SOILS FROM EARLIER VERY HEAVY RAINS. IN ADDITION
TO THE THREAT OF FLASH FLOODING...THESE HEAVY RAINS COULD PRODUCE
RAPID RISES IN AREA RIVERS...STREAMS AND NORMALLY DRY CREEKS.

TXC021-053-149-287-299-453-491-190000-
/O.CON.KEWX.FF.A.0005.000000T0000Z-140919T0000Z/
/00000.0.ER.000000T0000Z.000000T0000Z.000000T0000Z.OO/
BASTROP-BURNET-FAYETTE-LEE-LLANO-TRAVIS-WILLIAMSON-
INCLUDING THE CITIES OF...BASTROP...BURNET...LA GRANGE...
GIDDINGS...LLANO...AUSTIN...GEORGETOWN
450 AM CDT THU SEP 18 2014

...FLASH FLOOD WATCH REMAINS IN EFFECT THROUGH THIS EVENING...

THE FLASH FLOOD WATCH CONTINUES FOR

* THE FOLLOWING COUNTIES IN SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS...BASTROP...
  BURNET...FAYETTE...LEE...LLANO...TRAVIS AND WILLIAMSON.

* THROUGH THIS EVENING

* AVERAGE RAINFALL AMOUNTS OF 1 TO 2 INCHES...WITH ISOLATED
  AMOUNTS OF 3 TO 5 INCHES POSSIBLE ACROSS THE WATCH AREA.

* FLASH FLOODING OF LOW WATER CROSSINGS AND OTHER LOW LYING AND
  NORMALLY FLOOD PRONE AREAS IS LIKELY DUE TO HEAVY RAINS.
  NORMALLY DRY CREEKS AND AREA STREAMS MAY ALSO SEE RAPID RISES.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A FLASH FLOOD WATCH MEANS FLASH FLOODING IS POSSIBLE IN OR NEAR
THE WATCH AREA. IF YOU ARE IN THE WATCH AREA...PLAN NOW FOR WHAT
YOU WILL DO IF FLASH FLOODING DEVELOPS. STAY INFORMED AND BE
READY TO ACT IF YOU SEE FLOODING OR IF A FLASH FLOOD WARNING IS
ISSUED.

&&

A Few Models, Our Outlook Thusfar, & The Latest NWS Write-Up

September 17th, 2014 at 9:40 am by under Weather

 

 

HERE IS THE LATEST RELEASE FROM THE AUSTIN/SAN ANTONIO NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE OFFICE:

 

HEADLINE…Tropical air mass will bring threat of heavy rainfall and isolated flooding/flash flooding threat through Friday…

AREA OF CONCERN…Areas mainly east of a line from Rocksprings to Pleasanton.  This is roughly the eastern 2/3rds of South Central Texas.  This includes  the Hill Country, the I-35 Corridor from Austin to San Antonio, and the coastal plains east of I-35.

IMPACTS…Locally heavy rainfall with rain rates that may exceed 2-3 inches per hour.  Minor flooding, isolated flash flooding possible in those areas. Isolated rain totals of 3-5 inches.

TIMING…Peak of the thunderstorm activity should be Wednesday afternoon and evening.  While some decrease is expected overnight Wednesday, some activity will linger overnight.  A repeat is possible again on Thursday afternoon and evening.  Lesser chances on Friday.

CONFIDENCE…Moderate to High.

DISCUSSION…The atmosphere over South Central Texas is primed for locally heavy rainfall as moisture from what was once Hurricane Odile in the Pacific is spilling into the desert Southwest and portions of West Texas.  This mid and high level tropical moisture is combining with rich Gulf of Mexico moisture, setting the stage for shower and thunderstorm development later today…and again on Thursday and maybe even Friday.   While we are lacking a good trigger for storm development, daytime heating will be just enough of a trigger to develop scattered to numerous showers and thunderstorms late this morning into this afternoon and evening.  Like we saw on Tuesday, the storms will be slow moving, while bringing rain rates of 2-3 inches per hour.  This will lead to urban type flooding of streets and drainages as well as small stream flooding.  We could easily see isolated rain totals of 3-5 inches today somewhere in South Central Texas.  Because there is no real good focus for storm development, we do not see any favored locations of where the heaviest rain might set up.
We will continue to watch the weather models and radar trends carefully the next 12-24 hours.  If trends become apparent, a Flash Flood Watch may be issued.

The storms are expected to be most numerous across the eastern 2/3rds of South Central Texas…mainly east of a Rocksprings to Pleasanton line. Look for the activity to peak during the late afternoon/early evening hours and then linger through the first part of the night, maybe even past midnight.  So isolated flash flooding may be occurring later tonight.  Remember that most of our Flash Flood Fatalities are related to driving at night.  Thursday will see a repeat of the storm activity, mainly firing with daytime heating.  Again we will carry the threat of isolated flooding/flash flooding with isolated totals of 3-5 inches possible.

Rain chances will finally decrease by Friday into Saturday although isolated to scattered storms are still possible.

We will need to watch this scenario closely.  Everybody associated with emergency management/road conditions/ etc…need to monitor the weather over the next 48 hours.  Whenever you are dealing with tropical moisture from left over tropical storms/hurricanes…it bears watching over South Central Texas.
You can see the latest forecasts and watches/warnings/advisories by going to the Austin-San Antonio National Weather Service website at www.weather.gov/austin
HERE ARE THE TOTALS BEING PREDICTED BY A FEW OF OUR IN HOUSE MODELS
(Through Saturday Evening)
This particular model is our high resolution (HD) 3km model.  As you can see it predicts a lengthy swath of heavy rain from Llano through eastern Fayette County.  It even brings roughly 6″ of rain to the Bastrop area by  6:00 pm Wednesday.  We are still a little hesitant with this outlook due to its rookie status on handling remnants of a tropical system stirring up the wet weather.  We shall see!
2-5 Thurs Details
Meanwhile the lower resolution house model shows much less rainfall over the next 30-36 hours.
1 SPC
Here is the what the NWS is leaning toward as we enter Friday morning:
1 SPC
Finally here is our current outlook from the First Warning Weather Center:
2-5 Thurs Details
REMEMBER:  TURN AROUND DON’T DROWN!!!!!!!!!

Hurricane Odile devastates Cabo San Lucas

September 15th, 2014 at 1:40 pm by under Weather

Hurricane Odile has become the strongest hurricane ever to strike the Baha Peninsula. It is the most damaging hurricane to ever strike Cabo San Lucas. Click here for the latest information on the storm’s aftermath. Below is an excellent storm summary from Weather Underground’s Dr. Jeff Masters.

Destructive Hurricane Odile powered ashore at Cabo San Lucas on Mexico’s Baja Peninsula near 12:45 am EDT Monday as a Category 3 storm with 125 mph winds. Odile was the strongest hurricane on record to hit the Baja Peninsula, tied with Hurricane Olivia of 1967. An Air Force hurricane hunter plane was in Odile Sunday afternoon, and measured a surface pressure of 922 mb. This pressure puts Odile in pretty select company–only two other Eastern Pacific hurricanes have had lower pressures measured in them by the Hurricane Hunters (though a total of eleven Eastern Pacific hurricanes have had lower pressures, if we include satellite-estimated pressures.) The only major hurricane on record to affect Southern Baja was Hurricane Kiko of 1989, which moved ashore on the Gulf of California side of the peninsula just south of La Paz as a Category 3 storm with 120 mph winds.


Figure 1. MODIS satellite image of Hurricane Odile approaching the tip of Mexico’s Baja Peninsula, taken at approximately 4:30 pm EDT Sunday September 14, 2014. At the time, Odile was a Category 3 storm with 125 mph winds. Image credit: NASA.


Figure 2. Last radar image of Hurricane Odile taken at 4:46 pm EDT Sunday September 14, 2014, before the radar failed. Image credit: Conagua.

Damage from Odile will be heavy
A Personal Weather Station in Santa Rosa, about 3 miles inland from the coastal city of San Jose del Cabo, recorded winds of 76 mph, gusting to 114 mph, between 11 – 11:30 pm local time Sunday night. Read the rest of this entry »


Dangerous category 4 Hurricane Odile heading for Baja Peninsula

September 14th, 2014 at 4:12 pm by under Weather

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:58 PM GMT on September 14, 2014

Hurricane Warnings are flying for Mexico’s Baja Peninsula as dangerous Category 4 Hurricane Odile approaches.

Odile put on an impressive burst of rapid intensification Saturday night, going from a Category 1 hurricane with 75 mph winds to a Category 4 storm with 135 mph winds in just 24 hours. Satellite loops show that Odile has likely topped out in strength, but the storm has a large area of very intense eyewall thunderstorms and a prominent eye.  Odile’s heavy rains have mostly remained offshore of Mexico, though an outer spiral band brushed the Southwest coast of Mainland Mexico on Saturday, bringing 0.31″ of a rain and a wind gust of 32 mph to Manzanillo. Baja will not be so lucky.

The eyewall of Odile is likely to pass over or just to the west of the southern tip of the Baja Peninsula just before midnight PDT Sunday night. The 11 am EDT Sunday NHC Wind Probability Forecast gave Cabo San Lucason the southwestern tip of the Baja Peninsula a 99% chance of seeing tropical storm-force winds of 39+ mph, and a 47% chance of hurricane-force winds. These odds were 98% and 19%, respectively forSan Jose del Cabo, about 30 miles farther to the northeast. Tropical moisture flowing northwards from Odile’s circulation is likely to bring heavy rains to Northern Mexico and the Southwest U.S. late this week. An Air Force hurricane hunter aircraft will investigate Odile Sunday afternoon.


Figure 1. MODIS satellite image of Hurricane Odile off the coast of Mexico’s Baja Peninsula, taken at approximately 4 pm EDT Saturday September 13, 2014. At the time, Odile was a Category 1 storm with 90 mph winds. Image credit: NASA.

Links
Mexican radar
Villa del Palmar Beach Resort & Spa webcam in Cabo San Lucas

An incredibly active year for major Eastern Pacific hurricanes
Odile’s intensification into a Category 4 storm gives the Eastern Pacific east of 140°W seven major hurricanes so far this year. With the season typically only about two-thirds over by September 14, we have a decent chance of tying or beating the record of eight intense hurricanes in a season, set in 1992. The 2014 tally for the Eastern Pacific east of 140°W currently stands at 15 named storms, 10 hurricanes, and 7 intense hurricanes. An average Eastern Pacific hurricane season sees 15 named storms, 8 hurricanes, and 3 intense hurricanes during the entire year. The records for total number of named storms, hurricanes, and intense hurricanes were all set in 1992, with 25 named storms, 14 hurricanes, and 8 intense hurricanes. If we include the Central Pacific between 140°W and 180°W, these record tallies in 1992 were 28 named storms, 16 hurricanes, and 10 intense hurricanes, compared with the 2014 totals of 15 named storms, 11 hurricanes, and 8 intense hurricanes (Genevieve did not become a hurricane and then major hurricane until it crossed from the Eastern Pacific into the Central Pacific.) What’s really remarkable about the 2014 season is the proportion of named storms that have intensified to major hurricane strength: 8 of 15, or more than 50%. That’s really difficult to do, particularly when the cold water wakes left behind by previous major hurricanes chill down the sea surface temperatures.


Keep Austin Beautiful Lake Travis cleanup today

September 14th, 2014 at 5:25 am by under Weather

9-14 KAB FCAST

Join Keep Austin Beautiful, Travis County, and Colorado River Alliance for the biggest scuba diving and shoreline cleanup in Texas. Cleanup of the shoreline and bottom of Lake Travis is followed by a volunteer party featuring free lunch, music, and children’s activities. All volunteers receive a free t-shirt!
UNDERWATER AND SHORELINE CLEANUP 2014

Sunday, September 14, 2014
9:00 A.M. – 11:00 A.M.
  • Register here to volunteer along a park shoreline or at the volunteer appreciation party
  • For information about registering as a dive capitan or volunteer, click here
  • See site list below for cleanup locations
  • For questions about volunteering, please email or call Ivey at 512-391-0617 x 906
Shoreline Volunteer Sites DiveVolunteers Sites
  • Arkansas Bend
  • Bob Wentz at Windy Point
  • Cypress Creek
  • Low Water Crossing
  • Mansfield Dam Park
  • Mansfield Dam Overlook
  • Pace Bend
  • Sandy Creek
  • Tom Hughes
  • Hippie Hollow
  • Starnes Island (North, South, East)
  • Sometimes Island
  • Oasis Bluff (Tom Hughes)
  • Bob Wentz at Windy Point
  • Hippie Hollow (East, West)
  • Mansfield Dam
Volunteer Thank You Party

Sunday, September 14, 2014
11:00 A.M. – 1:30 P.M.
The Oasis on Lake Travis, 6500 Comanche Trail, 78732

After the cleanup, join us at The Oasis on Lake Travis for the Volunteer Appreciation Party featuring free lunch, live music, Finley the Fish’s dance moves, kids’ activities, most unique object contest, and door prizes!
To volunteer at the party, please register here. Volunteer tasks include serving food, handing out t-shirts, and bringing Finley the Fish to life!

Last year’s Lake Travis Underwater Cleanup:

On Sunday, September 15th, 2013, 1,015 volunteers geared up with wetsuits, scuba tanks, trash bags, and gloves to clean Lake Travis above and below water. From the shoreline and depths of Lake Travis, volunteers collected 1.6 tons of trash finding everything from common keys, glasses, cell phones (including iPhones), pull tabs, a boat motor, and shoes to more bizarre tweezers, a 20-year-old cassette tape, men’s whitey tighty underwear, a crankshaft, and a stainless steel grill. But the most unusual shoreline item of all, a pink flamingo cemented in a bucket, was found by Pack 205, who won a two-hour chartered sailing trip prize for their find. The value of volunteer time (2,500 hours) totals $55,000, plus the $20 bill found during the cleanup at Starnes Island.

View results from past events: 2012, 201120102009, and 2008

Hundreds of area rainfall totals

September 13th, 2014 at 4:40 pm by under Weather

CLICK HERE to go to our rainfall page to see hundreds of local, up-to-the-minute LCRA hydromet rain totals. Here are rainfall totals from the COCORAHS reports, but these do not include much of the rain that fell during the day Saturday.

COCORAHS PRECIPITATION SUMMARY
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE AUSTIN/SAN ANTONIO TX
1124 AM CDT SAT SEP 13 2014

COCORAHS PRECIPITATION REPORTS
THESE REPORTS ARE CONSIDERED SUPPLEMENTAL AND UNOFFICIAL
VALUES ARE FOR THE PREVIOUS 24 HOURS ENDING AROUND 7 AM LOCAL TIME
:
:COCORAHS PRECIPITATION REPORTS FOR THE LOCAL AREA
:
:                                               SNOW   SNOW  WATER
:                                        PCPN   FALL  DEPTH  EQUIV
:
TX-TV-125 : MANOR 5.5 SSE            *   : 3.30 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-CML-53 : BOERNE 10.2 E            *   : 2.82 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-TV-59  : TANGLEWOOD FOREST 0.6 NE *   : 2.81 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-TV-205 : TANGLEWOOD FOREST 1.9 NNE*   : 2.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-HYS-28 : MANCHACA 2.1 ENE         *   : 2.67 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM
TX-HYS-55 : MOUNTAIN CITY 6.7 WNW    *   : 2.65 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-TV-113 : AUSTIN 7.3 SW            *   : 2.52 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-HYS-60 : DRIFTWOOD 5.0 S          *   : 2.48 /  MM /   MM /   MM
TX-TV-217 : TANGLEWOOD FOREST 2.7 E  *   : 2.45 /  MM /   MM /   MM
 Read the rest of this entry »