Checkup says earth is running a temperature

July 22nd, 2014 at 1:54 pm by under Weather

By

(Climate Central) Looking at the state of the climate, you can see heat everywhere. From the top of the globe to the depths of the oceans and everywhere in between, the climate is warming and changing in ways humans have never experienced.

Last year was between the globe’s third- and sixth-warmest year on record, including record heat in Australia. The frequency of hot days in 2013 was also among the top 10 years while cold nights were among the bottom 10 years. And heat content in the upper ocean reached record highs as did sea levels.

A map showing global surface temperature anomalies averaged over 2013 compared to 1981-2010 average.
Credit: climate.gov

Those changes and more are chronicled in a new report published on Thursday in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. This is the 24th straight year of the report, which amounts to a global health checkup. Except in this case, instead of one doctor doing the exam, it was 425 scientists from 57 countries around the globe contributing to the nearly 260-page report.

It’s a massive undertaking to synthesize global climate data, which is why the report takes so long to put together and release.

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“The take-home message here is that the planet — its state of the climate — is changing more rapidly in today’s world than at any time in modern civilization,” said Tom Karl, director of NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center, in a call with reporters.

The global average temperature, which is a broad baseline used to measure the climate, was about 0.4°F above average according to four datasets most commonly used by scientists. That was high enough to rank 2013 as up to the third-warmest year since 1880. All 10 of the warmest years have come since, with 2010 topping the charts.

Global hot spots for 2013 included parts of Russia and Eastern Europe, as well as Australia and Northern Africa. One of the only land areas with cooler-than-normal temperatures was the eastern half of North America.

The frequency of hot days is another indicator of the world’s continued warm streak. Last year was also in top 10 territory, driven in part by the extremes in Australia and Europe. In contrast, cool nights were in shorter supply, with 2013 ranking in the bottom 10 years.

A map showing ocean heat content anomalies averaged over 2013 compared to 1993-2013 average.
Credit: climate.gov

Ocean surface temperatures in 2013 were also among the top 10 warmest. But more notable is the amount of heat stashed in the upper half mile of the ocean, which has increased steadily and reached a record high in 2013.

“Warming in the upper (up to 700 meters) oceans accounts for about 63 percent of the total increase in energy storage in the climate system from 1971 to 2010,” the report said.

Scientists have posited that the apparent “pause” in global warming is being driven by increased heat storage in this layer of the ocean. Ocean warming coupled with melting ice has contributed to sea level rise, which also reached record highs in 2013.

Arctic sea ice extent, glaciers and late spring snow cover all felt the heat last year as well. Each continued a trend in line with the impacts of climate change.

The other notable record, and one which connects the dots between a number of the trends outlined in the report, is atmospheric carbon dioxide. Levels of CO2 and other greenhouse gases that are helping drive climate change were at record highs in 2013. CO2 crossed a notable milestone, hitting 400 parts per million for the first time in human history. Of course, 2014 is on track to smash the records set in 2013, with CO2 levels spending 3 months above the 400 ppm threshold.

Beyond global trends, the year was marked by regional extremes. Australia had its hottest year on record and parts of China experienced record summer warmth. However, the biggest single weather event of the year was Super Typhoon Haiyan, which killed more than 6,000 and left 2 million homeless.

At its peak, sustained winds from the storm reached 196 mph, which is 15 mph faster than the previous record according to James Renwick, a climate scientist at the New Zealand Climate Change Center (Renwick also edited one of the chapters of the new report). Haiyan’s storm surge did most of the damage. Scientists are still assessing just how high it rose but estimates put it in the  range of 24 feet.

While the connection between the rapid intensification and strength of Haiyan with climate change is still being studied, sea level rise represents a more direct climate change link. The Philippines have seen as much as 7 inches of sea level rise since 1970. To put that in perspective, the planet as a whole has seen 8 inches of sea level rise since 1900.

“Sea level rise is much higher than the global average in this part of the world, so the sea’s are already a little higher. If you put a storm surge on top of higher sea level, it amounts to a greater extent of coastal inundation.” Renwick said.

With 2014 halfway over, there are no signs that the globe’s hot streak is ending. Data through May shows that this has been the planet’s fifth-warmest start to the year on record. Jessica Blunden, a scientist who works with NCDC, said that preliminary data show that June’s ocean temperatures were the hottest on record, a sign that 2014 is  on track to be one of the hottest years recorded. Another factor tipping the scales in that direction is the impending El Niño, a climate phenomenon that usually boosts global temperatures. Other indicators like greenhouse gas emissions, Arctic sea ice and deep ocean heat are also likely to keep following suit.


Hottest June on record globally

July 21st, 2014 at 7:43 pm by under Weather

The global temperature and rainfall summary for June 2014 was just released by the NOAA National Climatic Data Center, and the results are surprising.

Read more below:

june temps

 

Global Highlights

JUNE
2014
ANOMALY RANK
Land +1.71°F 7th Warmest
Ocean +1.15°F 1st Warmest
Land+Ocean +1.30°F 1st Warmest

Global Highlights

  • The combined average temperature over global land and ocean surfaces for June 2014 was the highest on record for the month, at 0.72°C (1.30°F) above the 20th century average of 15.5°C (59.9°F).
  • The global land surface temperature was 0.95°C (1.71°F) above the 20th century average of 13.3°C (55.9°F), the seventh highest for June on record.
  • For the ocean, the June global sea surface temperature was 0.64°C (1.15°F) above the 20thcentury average of 16.4°C (61.5°F), the highest for June on record and the highest departure from average for any month.
  • The combined global land and ocean average surface temperature for the January–June period (year-to-date) was 0.67°C (1.21°F) above the 20th century average of 13.5°C (56.3°F), tying with 2002 as the third warmest such period on record

Forecasters to test experimental lightning data

July 21st, 2014 at 1:39 pm by under Weather

Screen Shot 2014-05-15 at 10.48.39 AM

(NSSL)  NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) forecasters will test how lightning data impacts the warning process during convective events in the NOAA Hazardous Weather Testbed from July 21-August 29. The project is a collaboration between NSSL and Earth Networks, Inc., a private weather company.

Earth Networks has indicated the potential for its continental scale total lightning network (ENTLN) data and associated “Dangerous Thunderstorm Alerts” (DTAs) to increase forecaster situational awareness and lead times. Prior limited studies have shown the use of total lightning detections and associated derivative products could have positive impacts on the warning process.

During the tests, Earth Networks lightning data and its DTA products will be implemented into NWS operational software (AWIPS2) in the NOAA Hazardous Weather Testbed. Forecasters will complete a series of weather-warning scenarios in displaced real time, ranging from marginally severe to high-impact tornadic events for a variety of geographic locations.

These tests will evaluate the feasibility of using this data in warning operations, as well as the impact on warnings issued by NWS forecasters. The final outcome of this project is to make recommendations on possible product improvements, and determine whether Earth Networks products should become part of the operational product suites available to NWS offices nationally.


Beating The Heat: Safety Tips

July 21st, 2014 at 7:29 am by under Weather

1 SPC

If you plan on being out and about in summer, chances are you’ll be exposed to a lot of sun and higher temperatures.

Each year, heat kills at least 650 people on average in the United States — more than tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, lightning, or any other weather event combined.

“Heat can be a silent killer because it doesn’t topple trees or rip roofs off houses like tornadoes and hurricanes,” says Eli Jacks, chief of fire and public weather services with NOAA’s National Weather Service. “Nevertheless, it’s a dangerous weather condition for which people should prepare.”

How much heat can a person safely endure? It depends.

Certain groups of people should be especially careful during hot weather conditions. For example, city-dwellers and those living in the upper floors of tall buildings or in heat-prone regions are most at-risk for heat-related illness. People who have difficulty getting around or who have health conditions are particularly susceptible. The elderly and the very young also merit special attention during periods of high heat and humidity.

The National Weather Service and the  Occupational Safety and Health Administration have partnered again this year to increase awareness for outdoor workers and their employers during excessive heat events.  As part of this effort, the National Weather Service will incorporate specific outdoor worker safety precautions when heat advisories and warnings are issued.

 

083007_hot_thermometer

By taking some precautions, you can stay healthy while enjoying the great outdoors this summer:

1. Be informed and stay alert

Pay close attention to heat advisories or warnings that have been issued for your community.

  • NOAA’s National Weather Service continually updates heat-related advisories and warnings online at weather.gov. (Click on “Excessive Heat Warning” and “Heat Advisory” under the U.S. map — if there are no current warnings or advisories in the United States, nothing will appear).
  • NOAA issues excessive heat warnings when weather conditions pose an imminent threat to life andheat advisories when weather conditions are expected to cause significant discomfort or inconvenience or — if caution is not taken — become life threatening.
  • If you do not have Internet access, you can get heat advisory and warning information by watching your local television or radio newscast or by purchasing a NOAA weather radio and tuning into NOAA Weather Radio All-Hazards.
  • Use the temperature and humidity to figure out the heat index for your area, a measure that tells us how hot it feels.

2. Plan for periods of extreme heat

  • Visit your physician for a check-up to find out if you have a health condition that may be exacerbated by hot weather.
  • Service your air conditioner before hot weather arrives, and obtain window fans to help cool your home.
  • Know where to go when weather heats up. Find cool indoor places to spend time on hot summer days, such as a local library, shopping mall, museum or aquarium.

3. Know what to do and what not to do during hot weather

  • DO - Slow down, and reduce strenuous activity. Mow the lawn or garden in the early morning or late evening instead of midday.
  • DO - Dress in lightweight, nonrestrictive, light-colored clothing.
  • DO - Drink plenty of water or other nonalcoholic fluids.
  • DO - Eat light, easy-to-digest foods.
  • DO - Seek out shade if you have to be outdoors for extended periods. Spend more time in air-conditioned places.
  • DO - Check on elderly neighbors, friends and relatives to make sure they are okay.
  • DO - When outside, take frequent dips in the ocean or pool, or mist yourself with a water bottle. When inside, take frequent cool baths or showers and use cold compresses to cool off.
  • DO - Apply high-SPF sunscreen frequently when outdoors.
  • DO - Seek immediate medical attention if you experience symptoms of heat illness. (See chart below for symptoms, likely conditions and treatment.)

keep calm

However, please remember:

  • DO NOT leave children, the elderly, or pets in the car for any reason, for any length of time. A dark dashboard or seat can easily reach temperatures in the range of 180 to more than 200 degrees F!
  • DO NOT stay in the sun for long periods.
  • DO NOT take salt tablets unless directed by a physician.
  • AVOID alcoholic beverages; they can dehydrate you and increase your risk of heat stroke and other potentially fatal heat-related illnesses.

4. Know the warning signs of heat-related illness

Excessive heat exposure can raise your body temperature to unhealthy levels and may make you ill — it can also be deadly. Take the precautions listed above and be on the lookout for these warning signs that you may be in trouble:

Symptom Likely Condition Treatment
Painful muscle cramps and spasms, usually in muscles of legs and abdomen. Heavy sweating. Heat cramps Apply firm pressure on cramping muscles or gently massage to relieve spasm.

Give sips of water; if nausea occurs, discontinue water intake.

Consult with a clinician or physician if individual has fluid restrictions (e.g., dialysis patients).

Heavy sweating, weakness,
cool skin, pale and clammy. Weak pulse. Normal temperature possible. Possible muscle cramps, dizziness, fainting, nausea and vomiting.
Heat exhaustion Move individual out of sun, lay him or her down, and loosen clothing.

Apply cool, wet cloths.

Fan or move individual to air conditioned room.

Give sips of water; if nausea occurs, discontinue water intake.

If vomiting continues, seek immediate medical attention. Consult with a clinician or physician if individual has fluid restrictions (e.g., dialysis patients).

Altered mental state. Possible throbbing headache, confusion, nausea and dizziness. High body temperature (106°F or higher). Rapid and strong pulse. Possible unconsciousness. Skin may be hot and dry, or patient may be sweating. Sweating likely especially if patient was previously involved in vigorous activity. Heat stroke Heat stroke is a severe medical emergency.

Summon emergency medical assistance or get the individual to a hospital immediately.

Delay can be fatal.

Move individual to a cooler, preferably air-conditioned, environment.

Reduce body temperature with a water mister and fan or sponging.

Use air conditioners. Use fans if heat index temperatures are below the high 90s. Use extreme caution.

Remove clothing. If temperature rises again, repeat process. Do not give fluids.

 

 

 


How does wet soil keep us cooler during the day?

July 20th, 2014 at 9:23 am by under Weather

A summertime ridge of high pressure is building over Texas today through the coming week.

This type of weather pattern can often send temperatures soaring over 100 degrees. But we’re forecasting highs of only 91 Sunday, and temperatures remaining below 100 through the entire work week.

What gives?

The answer has to do with soil moisture.

7-20 ID soil 1

Parts of Austin and surrounding communities received 5-8″ of rain last Thursday night into Friday morning.

Those heavy, flooding rains left the soil around the area very wet.

7-20 ID soil 2

 

Wet soil gives off moisture into the lower parts of the atmosphere, which keeps daytime temperatures cooler.

It depends on the temperature, wind speed, humidity, season, and amount of sunshine – but wet soil such as this often takes as long as 4-5 days to fully dry to the point where it is not affecting high temperatures.

So when you’re outside today and you get hot – just remember, it could be hotter.

Have a great weekend!


National Weather Service Rainfall Total Summary From 7/17-7/18

July 18th, 2014 at 12:50 pm by under Weather

890

SXUS54 KEWX 181618

LCOEWX

 

COCORAHS PRECIPITATION SUMMARY

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE AUSTIN/SAN ANTONIO TX

1115 AM CDT FRI JUL 18 2014

 

COCORAHS PRECIPITATION REPORTS

THESE REPORTS ARE CONSIDERED SUPPLEMENTAL AND UNOFFICIAL

VALUES ARE FOR THE PREVIOUS 24 HOURS ENDING AROUND 7 AM LOCAL TIME

 

.B EWX 0718 C DH07/PP/SF/SD/SW

:

:COCORAHS PRECIPITATION REPORTS FOR THE LOCAL AREA

:

:                                               SNOW   SNOW  WATER

:                                        PCPN   FALL  DEPTH  EQUIV

:

TX-TV-201 : AUSTIN 4.2 ESE           *   : 8.25 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-118 : AUSTIN 4.5 ENE           *   : 5.71 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-47  : AUSTIN 4.7 E(JORDANPK)   *   : 5.53 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-159 : AUSTIN 1.0 NNE           *   : 5.38 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-88  : CEDAR PARK 1.5 WNW       *   : 5.21 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-106 : ROUND ROCK 4.7 ESE       *   : 5.20 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-11 : TIMBERWOOD PARK 7.7 ENE  *   : 5.12 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-167 : AUSTIN 3.0 E             *   : 5.10 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-166 : CEDAR PARK 2.4 WNW       *   : 4.78 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-16  : CEDAR PARK 2.7 SSW       *   : 4.75 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-178 : ROUND ROCK 3.6 E         *   : 4.60 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-10  : BOERNE 6.0 WSW           *   : 4.55 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-111: BULVERDE 5.5 ENE         *   : 4.53 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-95 : BULVERDE 4.2 ENE         *   : 4.48 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-14  : AUSTIN 2.9 NE(LAMAR&ARPT)*   : 4.45 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-10  : AUSTIN 1.7 NNW(45TH&LP1) *   : 4.35 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-176 : AUSTIN 2.4 N             *   : 4.24 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-02  : AUSTIN 2.8 N(ALLANDALE)  *   : 4.21 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-96  : GEORGETOWN 4.6 NNW       *   : 4.17 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-41  : CEDAR PARK 1.0 ESE       *   : 4.12 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-FR-02  : PEARSALL 7.9 NNW         *   : 4.10 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-115 : GEORGETOWN 7.4 WSW       *   : 4.07 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-12  : BOERNE 4.0 WSW           *   : 4.05 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-14 : HELOTES 1.0 ENE          *   : 4.04 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-183 : CEDAR PARK 3.1 SSW       *   : 4.02 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-78  : GEORGETOWN 8.0 W         *   : 4.01 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-146 : LEANDER 2.2 ESE          *   : 4.01 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-87  : AUSTIN 3.9 NNE           *   : 4.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-FR-10  : PEARSALL 21.1 WNW        *   : 3.96 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-156 : GEORGETOWN 4.9 NW        *   : 3.92 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-28 : LEON VALLEY 1.6 N        *   : 3.88 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-142 : LEANDER 3.4 NNE          *   : 3.85 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-170 : HUTTO 1.4 SW             *   : 3.83 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-24 : BULVERDE 4.3 ESE         *   : 3.81 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-129: TIMBERWOOD PARK 3.0 SW   *   : 3.80 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-57  : AUSTIN 3.3 N(LP1&FARWST) *   : 3.80 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-175 : GEORGETOWN 6.7 NW        *   : 3.78 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-05  : KENDALIA 5.2 SSW         *   : 3.76 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-192: HELOTES 2.4 NNW          *   : 3.74 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-174: HELOTES 1.3 NE           *   : 3.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-49  : WELLS BRANCH 4.2 S       *   : 3.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-148 : ROUND ROCK 3.0 NE        *   : 3.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-171 : GEORGETOWN 7.3 W         *   : 3.65 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-14  : BRUSHY CREEK 2.3 SW      *   : 3.62 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-55  : ANDERSON MILL 1.1 ENE    *   : 3.61 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-136 : PFLUGERVILLE 4.5 NE      *   : 3.60 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-118 : BRUSHY CREEK 2.3 SW      *   : 3.55 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-15  : KENDALIA 5.4 S           *   : 3.52 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-MDN-36 : HONDO 11.0 E             *   : 3.51 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-152 : AUSTIN 0.8 WSW           *   : 3.48 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-98  : CEDAR PARK 3.0 S         *   : 3.46 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-253: CASTLE HILLS 1.9 NE      *   : 3.45 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-39  : ROUND ROCK 1.0 S         *   : 3.45 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-135 : GEORGETOWN 8.9 E         *   : 3.41 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-163: LEON VALLEY 1.9 WNW      *   : 3.36 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-163 : PFLUGERVILLE 2.5 NNE     *   : 3.35 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-162 : LIBERTY HILL 1.2 N       *   : 3.35 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-95 : HELOTES 3.7 SSE          *   : 3.29 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-08  : TAYLOR 0.9 NNW           *   : 3.28 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-74  : GEORGETOWN 3.0 ESE       *   : 3.25 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-143: ALAMO HEIGHTS 0.7 NNW    *   : 3.19 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-43  : PFLUGERVILLE 2.6 N       *   : 3.15 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-176: SAN ANTONIO 5.4 SW       *   : 3.12 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-49  : FREDERICKSBURG 8.0 WNW   *   : 3.12 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-27  : BOERNE 8.8 NE            *   : 3.10 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-60  : BOERNE 8.4 ENE           *   : 3.10 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-61  : ANDERSON MILL 1.4 NW     *   : 3.09 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-44  : JOLLYVILLE 1.2 WNW       *   : 3.08 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-94  : BOERNE 7.8 NE            *   : 3.05 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-208 : PFLUGERVILLE 3.3 E       *   : 3.04 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-56 : DRIFTWOOD 2.8 NNW        *   : 3.03 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-22  : LIBERTY HILL 0.6 NNW     *   : 3.03 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-102 : ROUND ROCK 3.4 E         *   : 3.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-110 : LIBERTY HILL 4.3 ENE     *   : 3.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BND-44 : PIPE CREEK 3.5 NNW       *   : 2.95 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-146: FAIR OAKS RANCH 0.4 WSW  *   : 2.95 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-176 : GEORGETOWN 6.1 NNW       *   : 2.94 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-61 : BASTROP 7.6 N            *   : 2.93 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-49 : MCDADE 4.6 SSW           *   : 2.92 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-MDN-03 : HONDO 8.7 E              *   : 2.89 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-35  : PFLUGERVILLE 0.6 ENE     *   : 2.89 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-24  : BOERNE 2.0 WNW           *   : 2.85 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-27 : SCENIC OAKS 0.8 SW       *   : 2.84 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-44 : ELGIN 0.9 NW             *   : 2.83 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-145 : AUSTIN 12.7 NNW          *   : 2.83 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-30  : ANDERSON MILL 2.2 S      *   : 2.81 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-76  : PFLUGERVILLE 1.0 SSW     *   : 2.81 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-169 : ROUND ROCK 2.2 W         *   : 2.80 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-11  : GEORGETOWN 0.5 N         *   : 2.79 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-MDN-18 : HONDO 8.8 E              *   : 2.78 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-126 : AUSTIN 10.7 N            *   : 2.72 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-22  : BOERNE 4.7 WNW           *   : 2.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-75  : JOLLYVILLE 2.1 SSW       *   : 2.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-76  : THRALL 10.8 SSE          *   : 2.69 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-123 : AUSTIN 10.5 N            *   : 2.68 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-100: DRIFTWOOD 2.4 NNW        *   : 2.65 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-68  : JOLLYVILLE 1.6 SSE       *   : 2.65 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-150 : AUSTIN 4.5 NNE           *   : 2.65 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-35  : BERTRAM 6.4 ESE          *   : 2.65 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-212 : AUSTIN 8.5 NNW           *   : 2.61 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-75 : CIRCLE D-KC ESTATES 0.9 S*   : 2.60 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-95  : BOERNE 2.2 WNW           *   : 2.60 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-197 : LEANDER 4.4 WSW          *   : 2.60 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KY-03  : BRACKETTVILLE 0.1 NE     *   : 2.59 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-86  : AUSTIN 4.7 NNE           *   : 2.57 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BND-43 : BANDERA 7.4 ENE          *   : 2.56 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-38 : HELOTES 4.5 WSW          *   : 2.55 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-161 : TAYLOR 2.4 S             *   : 2.54 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-31 : CHINA GROVE 4.6 WSW      *   : 2.53 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-17  : TAYLOR 8.5 SE            *   : 2.53 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-212: HOLLYWOOD PARK 2.0 NW    *   : 2.52 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-73  : FAIR OAKS RANCH 1.8 NW   *   : 2.52 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-01  : AUSTIN 10.0 NNW(GRTHILLS)*   : 2.50 / 0.0 /  0.0 / 0.00

TX-WM-04  : GEORGETOWN 1.3 WNW       *   : 2.50 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LE-12  : LEXINGTON 2.7 SSE        *   : 2.49 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-219 : AUSTIN 7.9 N             *   : 2.47 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-70  : ROUND ROCK 1.8 SW        *   : 2.46 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-188: SAN ANTONIO 5.1 W        *   : 2.45 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-52  : BOERNE 2.1 WNW           *   : 2.45 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-273: BLOSSOM PARK 0.1 ESE     *   : 2.44 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-01  : GEORGETOWN 1.2 W         *   : 2.44 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-119 : BARTLETT 5.0 W           *   : 2.43 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-179 : GEORGETOWN 1.5 WNW       *   : 2.39 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-270: BOERNE 7.2 SE            *   : 2.36 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-08  : FAIR OAKS RANCH 2.2 NNW  *   : 2.36 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-68  : GEORGETOWN 4.5 SSE       *   : 2.36 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-71  : GEORGETOWN 5.8 SE        *   : 2.36 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-14  : FAIR OAKS RANCH 2.2 NNW  *   : 2.33 / 0.0 /  0.0 / 0.00

TX-BXR-121: SAN ANTONIO 3.0 S        *   : 2.33 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-07  : FAIR OAKS RANCH 10.0 NNE *   : 2.32 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-211 : AUSTIN 8.0 N(BULLRUN)    *   : 2.32 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-31  : FREDERICKSBURG 9.1 WSW   *   : 2.31 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-46  : FREDERICKSBURG 9.1 WSW   *   : 2.30 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-60 : DRIFTWOOD 5.0 S          *   : 2.30 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LE-05  : LEXINGTON 6.7 S          *   : 2.30 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-152 : CEDAR PARK 4.6 E         *   : 2.30 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-75 : SHAVANO PARK 1.1 W       *   : 2.29 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-65 : HOLLYWOOD PARK 5.2 NE    *   : 2.25 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-55 : MOUNTAIN CITY 6.7 WNW    *   : 2.24 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-56  : BOERNE 10.5 ENE          *   : 2.22 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-83  : MANOR 5.1 SSE            *   : 2.20 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-MDN-41 : D’HANIS 2.4 NNE          *   : 2.18 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-09  : WEST LAKE HILLS 2.4 NNW  *   : 2.15 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-65  : BOERNE 1.2 E             *   : 2.12 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-MDN-25 : RIO MEDINA 5.5 NNW       *   : 2.12 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-218: CASTLE HILLS 0.7 NW      *   : 2.10 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-214 : AUSTIN 9.6 WNW           *   : 2.10 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-48 : CANYON LAKE 8.1 NW       *   : 2.08 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-59  : BOERNE 13.7 NE           *   : 2.08 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LE-13  : LEXINGTON 8.8 SW         *   : 2.08 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-MDN-27 : MICO 5.0 E               *   : 2.08 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-104 : GEORGETOWN 1.6 W         *   : 2.08 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-117 : AUSTIN 5.9 NW            *   : 2.05 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-211: SHAVANO PARK 3.4 SW      *   : 2.04 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-83 : PAIGE 4.6 SW             *   : 2.02 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LE-15  : LEXINGTON 2.3 SSW        *   : 2.02 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-61  : JONESTOWN 0.8 NE         *   : 2.01 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-27  : LEANDER 1.9 WSW          *   : 2.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-02 : ELGIN 4.4 SSE            *   : 1.93 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-264: ATASCOSA 2.3 NE          *   : 1.92 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM

TX-MDN-23 : DEVINE 0.4 S             *   : 1.92 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-215: HOLLYWOOD PARK 4.5 NE    *   : 1.91 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-21 : HOLLYWOOD PARK 1.8 N     *   : 1.90 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-198 : AUSTIN 4.0 SSE           *   : 1.90 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-48  : THRALL 10.5 SSE          *   : 1.86 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-AT-21  : JOURDANTON 5.2 NNW       *   : 1.85 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-75 : BERTRAM 3.7 SE           *   : 1.84 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-MDN-10 : MICO 6.4 WSW             *   : 1.84 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-01 : ELGIN 3.5 NNE            *   : 1.78 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KY-04  : BRACKETTVILLE 0.8 S      *   : 1.78 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WO-28  : FLORESVILLE 8.9 WNW      *   : 1.74 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-03  : HARPER 10.1 SSE          *   : 1.71 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-138: LEON VALLEY 2.8 W        *   : 1.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-130: BOERNE 10.4 E            *   : 1.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-46 : BASTROP 4.9 NE           *   : 1.68 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-30 : KYLE 1.1 SSE             *   : 1.68 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-135: TERRELL HILLS 1.0 NE     *   : 1.67 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-78 : BASTROP 4.7 NE           *   : 1.66 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-MDN-16 : CASTROVILLE 4.0 SW       *   : 1.64 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-42 : BASTROP 5.7 NE           *   : 1.62 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-AT-25  : PLEASANTON 9.1 NE        *   : 1.60 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-184: SAN ANTONIO 8.0 NNW      *   : 1.60 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-53  : BOERNE 10.6 NE           *   : 1.60 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WO-10  : ELMENDORF 5.6 ENE        *   : 1.60 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-30  : INGRAM 10.2 NW           *   : 1.59 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-124 : LIBERTY HILL 4.7 W       *   : 1.59 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-26  : GEORGETOWN 4.7 NNE       *   : 1.58 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-86 : BASTROP 5.1 NE           *   : 1.55 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-48 : HOLLYWOOD PARK 1.7 ESE   *   : 1.55 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WO-39  : FLORESVILLE 9.4 NW       *   : 1.51 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-AT-28  : LYTLE 2.0 SSE            *   : 1.50 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KY-18  : BRACKETTVILLE 2.0 SSW    *   : 1.50 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BND-29 : BANDERA 4.7 NE           *   : 1.49 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-MDN-33 : HONDO 3.4 S              *   : 1.48 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WO-45  : LA VERNIA 3.6 SSW        *   : 1.47 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-90 : WIMBERLEY 5.3 N          *   : 1.46 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-AT-05  : JOURDANTON 6.0 SSW       *   : 1.45 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-01  : INGRAM 14.2 NW           *   : 1.44 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-MDN-44 : NATALIA 5.4 SSE          *   : 1.44 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-171 : AUSTIN 3.7 SSW           *   : 1.44 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-AT-18  : PLEASANTON 0.4 E         *   : 1.43 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-51 : SPRING BRANCH 2.4 SW     *   : 1.42 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-217 : TANGLEWOOD FOREST 2.7 E  *   : 1.42 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WO-34  : POTH 0.6 SSE             *   : 1.42 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-205: CONVERSE 1.6 NW          *   : 1.41 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-88 : MCDADE 1.4 NNE           *   : 1.38 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-AT-26  : POTEET 4.9 W             *   : 1.34 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-86 : KYLE 2.0 SE              *   : 1.34 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-116: KYLE 2.5 NW              *   : 1.34 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-ED-24  : ROCKSPRINGS 18.4 WNW     *   : 1.32 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-92 : KYLE 2.5 NW              *   : 1.32 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-58 : CEDAR CREEK 5.9 N        *   : 1.31 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-19 : SAN MARCOS 2.9 WNW       *   : 1.31 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-32 : HOLLYWOOD PARK 4.4 E     *   : 1.30 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-180: LEON SPRINGS 2.6 N       *   : 1.30 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-25 : GARDEN RIDGE 1.8 WNW     *   : 1.29 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-71  : BOERNE 6.5 N             *   : 1.29 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-111 : AUSTIN 10.8 WSW          *   : 1.28 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-122 : AUSTIN 5.6 WSW           *   : 1.28 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-155 : AUSTIN 4.6 SSW           *   : 1.27 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WO-05  : FLORESVILLE 8.1 NNW      *   : 1.27 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-60 : BRIGGS 3.9 NNE           *   : 1.25 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-66 : ELGIN 11.5 SW            *   : 1.25 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-241: LIVE OAK 4.6 WNW         *   : 1.25 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-160 : ROLLINGWOOD 2.8 SW       *   : 1.25 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WO-29  : FLORESVILLE 0.7 S        *   : 1.24 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-50  : SISTERDALE 1.7 SE        *   : 1.23 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WO-27  : FLORESVILLE 0.7 SW       *   : 1.23 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-MDN-28 : NATALIA 0.4 NE           *   : 1.22 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-AT-01  : POTEET 4.1 ENE           *   : 1.20 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-279: LIVE OAK 0.8 SSW         *   : 1.20 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-AT-38  : JOURDANTON 0.6 NW        *   : 1.18 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-FY-02  : ROUND TOP 0.2 W          *   : 1.18 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-59  : TANGLEWOOD FOREST 0.6 NE *   : 1.17 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-165 : AUSTIN 5.7 SSW           *   : 1.16 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BND-38 : PIPE CREEK 3.4 SW        *   : 1.12 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-87 : BASTROP 6.2 W            *   : 1.12 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-221: SELMA 3.9 WNW            *   : 1.11 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-14  : NEW BERLIN 6.7 SE        *   : 1.10 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BND-08 : PIPE CREEK 3.0 NW        *   : 1.07 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-41  : SCHERTZ 2.0 NNW          *   : 1.07 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-45  : HARPER 6.5 SW            *   : 1.07 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-125 : MANOR 5.5 SSE            *   : 1.06 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-48  : HARPER 3.2 W             *   : 1.05 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-58  : ANDICE 1.6 SW            *   : 1.05 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-77  : BOERNE 5.3 N             *   : 1.03 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-69 : CEDAR CREEK 1.0 ENE      *   : 1.01 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BND-24 : PIPE CREEK 4.9 SSW       *   : 1.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-48 : BURNET 3.7 N             *   : 1.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-21 : SAN MARCOS 7.1 W         *   : 1.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-164 : AUSTIN 4.1 SW            *   : 1.00 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-117: KYLE 7.8 ENE             *   : 0.98 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KY-07  : BRACKETTVILLE 2.0 W      *   : 0.98 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-113 : AUSTIN 7.3 SW            *   : 0.98 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-20  : HARPER 3.3 WSW           *   : 0.97 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-33 : OATMEAL 1.7 WNW          *   : 0.95 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-73 : BERTRAM 5.3 N            *   : 0.95 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-20 : CANYON LAKE 9.2 W        *   : 0.95 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-45  : BOERNE 3.4 N             *   : 0.95 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-136: LACKLAND AFB 7.8 WNW     *   : 0.94 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-MDN-21 : D’HANIS 3.5 WSW          *   : 0.93 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-07 : SPRING BRANCH 4.0 SSE    *   : 0.92 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-FY-30  : LA GRANGE 7.8 NNE        *   : 0.88 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-FY-33  : FAYETTEVILLE 1.0 SW      *   : 0.88 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-61 : NEW BRAUNFELS 10.0 W     *   : 0.87 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WO-30  : ADKINS 6.4 SSE           *   : 0.87 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-03  : INGRAM 4.4 NW            *   : 0.86 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-02 : SPRING BRANCH 5.1 SSE    *   : 0.85 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LL-30  : KINGSLAND 1.9 WSW        *   : 0.85 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-112 : AUSTIN 5.7 SSE           *   : 0.85 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-07 : BASTROP 1.2 N            *   : 0.84 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-23  : SEGUIN 1.9 E             *   : 0.84 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BND-30 : BANDERA 6.4 N            *   : 0.82 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-79 : BASTROP 1.5 NW           *   : 0.82 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-73  : SCHERTZ 4.6 NNE          *   : 0.82 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-74 : BASTROP 1.2 N            *   : 0.80 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-218 : ONION CREEK 3.2 ENE      *   : 0.80 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-128: NEW BRAUNFELS 10.0 W     *   : 0.79 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-07  : HARPER 1.4 S             *   : 0.78 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-34  : SUNSET VALLEY 0.7 SE     *   : 0.78 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-60  : TANGLEWOOD FOREST 3.5 NW *   : 0.78 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CLD-30 : LULING 4.4 NNW           *   : 0.77 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-37 : CANYON LAKE 2.8 N        *   : 0.77 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KS-03  : KARNES CITY 12.6 WSW     *   : 0.77 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-17  : MCQUEENEY 3.4 SW         *   : 0.75 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GZ-25  : GONZALES 0.6 S           *   : 0.75 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LL-37  : KINGSLAND 1.4 ESE        *   : 0.75 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-36 : BASTROP 1.0 WNW          *   : 0.74 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-47  : FREDERICKSBURG 4.6 WNW   *   : 0.74 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LL-17  : SUNRISE BEACH VILLAGE 0.5*   : 0.73 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-18  : FREDERICKSBURG 12.2 W    *   : 0.72 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-98 : SAN MARCOS 1.8 NW        *   : 0.72 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-46 : CIBOLO 3.9 N             *   : 0.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-86 : NEW BRAUNFELS 5.2 W      *   : 0.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-104: SPRING BRANCH 5.7 SE     *   : 0.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-53  : NEW BRAUNFELS 2.8 S      *   : 0.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-46  : LAGO VISTA 1.4 SSW       *   : 0.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-54  : SUNSET VALLEY 2.0 SW     *   : 0.70 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-49 : CANYON LAKE 5.3 SW       *   : 0.69 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-35  : MOUNTAIN HOME 13.1 SW    *   : 0.69 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-80 : NEW BRAUNFELS 6.3 NNE    *   : 0.68 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-07 : DRIPPING SPRINGS 4.3 E   *   : 0.67 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BND-22 : BANDERA 8.6 NNW          *   : 0.65 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-43 : DALE 7.6 N               *   : 0.65 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-68 : BASTROP 2.1 SSW          *   : 0.65 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LL-20  : SUNRISE BEACH VILLAGE 1.1*   : 0.65 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-04  : BOERNE 5.1 NNW           *   : 0.64 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-35 : NEW BRAUNFELS 5.5 WNW    *   : 0.63 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-09 : NEW BRAUNFELS 7.0 NNE    *   : 0.61 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-22 : BURNET 1.9 SE            *   : 0.60 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LL-24  : HORSESHOE BAY 3.1 W      *   : 0.60 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BLC-10 : JOHNSON CITY 2.2 N       *   : 0.58 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BLC-23 : BLANCO 7.2 SE            *   : 0.58 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-04 : NEW BRAUNFELS 2.4 SSW    *   : 0.58 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-79 : NEW BRAUNFELS 5.0 W      *   : 0.58 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-88  : SAN MARCOS 6.6 SSW       *   : 0.58 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-72  : COMFORT 4.5 SE           *   : 0.58 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LL-23  : KINGSLAND 0.5 S          *   : 0.58 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-17 : WYLDWOOD 8.3 SSW         *   : 0.57 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-200 : LAKEWAY 3.5 ENE          *   : 0.57 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-12 : CANYON LAKE 2.5 W        *   : 0.55 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-ED-12  : ROCKSPRINGS 8.5 WSW      *   : 0.55 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-56  : SEGUIN 5.0 SSE           *   : 0.55 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GZ-05  : GONZALES 3.8 SW          *   : 0.55 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-50  : INGRAM 3.1 NW            *   : 0.55 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-51 : BERTRAM 8.8 SSW          *   : 0.54 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-ED-02  : ROCKSPRINGS 5.4 NW       *   : 0.54 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-28 : MANCHACA 2.1 ENE         *   : 0.54 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-107: DRIPPING SPRINGS 7.2 E   *   : 0.54 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-13 : HIGHLAND HAVEN 1.3 SW    *   : 0.53 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-39  : HARPER 4.9 N             *   : 0.53 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-59 : AUSTIN 14.7 WSW          *   : 0.53 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-38  : HARPER 5.4 N             *   : 0.52 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-82  : NEW BRAUNFELS 3.1 S      *   : 0.52 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BND-41 : BANDERA 4.0 NNW          *   : 0.51 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-65 : GRANITE SHOALS 0.9 S     *   : 0.51 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-03 : NEW BRAUNFELS 3.1 WNW    *   : 0.51 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-ED-19  : ROCKSPRINGS 17.9 WSW     *   : 0.51 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-56 : BERTRAM 9.1 SSW          *   : 0.50 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LL-19  : HORSESHOE BAY 2.7 W      *   : 0.50 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BXR-134: MARION 6.3 SW            *   : 0.49 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-34  : MCQUEENEY 0.5 ENE        *   : 0.48 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GZ-10  : GONZALES 4.5 SSE         *   : 0.48 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-52  : OAK HILL 1.1 WSW         *   : 0.48 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-81  : COMFORT 2.6 N            *   : 0.47 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-114 : AUSTIN 8.2 WSW           *   : 0.47 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-29 : NEW BRAUNFELS 5.9 NW     *   : 0.46 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-22 : CANYON LAKE 7.2 ESE      *   : 0.45 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-86  : SEGUIN 2.3 NE            *   : 0.45 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-38  : CENTER POINT 2.4 ESE     *   : 0.45 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-05 : NEW BRAUNFELS 2.3 NE     *   : 0.44 / 0.0 /  0.0 / 0.00

TX-GS-28  : WILLOW CITY 4.2 W        *   : 0.44 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GZ-16  : LEESVILLE 4.2 NE         *   : 0.44 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-15  : INGRAM 8.6 WSW           *   : 0.44 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-ZV-15  : CRYSTAL CITY 0.5 ESE     *   : 0.44 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-25  : WILLOW CITY 4.3 W        *   : 0.43 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-132: NEW BRAUNFELS 2.2 ESE    *   : 0.42 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-87  : SEGUIN 5.1 NW            *   : 0.42 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-98 : NEW BRAUNFELS 0.6 W      *   : 0.41 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-DM-02  : CARRIZO SPRINGS 3.0 NNE  *   : 0.41 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-62  : NEW BRAUNFELS 2.4 S      *   : 0.41 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-135 : CREEDMOOR 1.5 NNW        *   : 0.41 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-40 : NEW BRAUNFELS 0.1 ENE    *   : 0.40 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-103: NEW BRAUNFELS 0.5 N      *   : 0.40 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-175 : SAN LEANNA 0.1 SSE       *   : 0.40 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-41 : NEW BRAUNFELS 2.8 NNE    *   : 0.39 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-01 : BURNET 5.4 NNW           *   : 0.38 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CLD-12 : HARWOOD 4.7 NNE          *   : 0.38 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-60 : NEW BRAUNFELS 10.4 NW    *   : 0.38 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-09  : FREDERICKSBURG 1.8 NE    *   : 0.38 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-74 : SAN MARCOS 1.8 SSW       *   : 0.38 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-53 : GRANITE SHOALS 1.6 E     *   : 0.37 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-31  : NEW BRAUNFELS 2.5 SSE    *   : 0.37 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-203 : LOST CREEK 5.1 SW        *   : 0.37 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CML-115: NEW BRAUNFELS 1.5 NNW    *   : 0.36 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-81 : SMITHVILLE 0.9 E         *   : 0.35 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-141 : LAGO VISTA 1.5 SW        *   : 0.35 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GP-64  : SEGUIN 7.6 N             *   : 0.34 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KS-10  : RUNGE 0.1 SSW            *   : 0.33 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-36 : SPICEWOOD 2.2 NW         *   : 0.32 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-DW-07  : YOAKUM 6.2 WNW           *   : 0.32 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-03 : WIMBERLEY 4.4 E          *   : 0.32 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LV-04  : SHINER 1.9 E             *   : 0.32 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-54  : CENTER POINT 0.5 SE      *   : 0.31 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-05 : MARBLE FALLS 0.7 NW      *   : 0.30 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-69 : MEADOWLAKES 0.4 NNE      *   : 0.30 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CLD-14 : LULING 6.9 NW            *   : 0.30 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-113: WOODCREEK 0.5 SSW        *   : 0.30 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-64  : INGRAM 0.7 E             *   : 0.30 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-WM-113 : JARRELL 4.4 W            *   : 0.30 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BND-33 : BANDERA 4.0 E            *   : 0.29 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-31 : MARBLE FALLS 5.8 NNW     *   : 0.29 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-55 : MARBLE FALLS 1.4 NE      *   : 0.29 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-63 : MEADOWLAKES 0.2 W        *   : 0.29 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CLD-11 : LULING 7.4 NE            *   : 0.29 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KS-01  : RUNGE 0.7 ENE            *   : 0.29 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BND-23 : BANDERA 3.2 W            *   : 0.28 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-80 : BASTROP 1.7 SE           *   : 0.28 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CLD-29 : LOCKHART 5.2 S           *   : 0.28 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-17 : DRIPPING SPRINGS 8.4 W   *   : 0.28 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-65 : SAN MARCOS 6.3 WSW       *   : 0.28 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LL-07  : HORSESHOE BAY 2.7 S      *   : 0.28 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CLD-33 : LOCKHART 5.4 NNE         *   : 0.27 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-26  : FREDERICKSBURG 11.4 NE   *   : 0.27 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-32  : FREDERICKSBURG 12.4 NE   *   : 0.27 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-54 : WIMBERLEY 5.2 WNW        *   : 0.27 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-99  : BEE CAVE 2.5 ENE         *   : 0.27 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-45 : MARBLE FALLS 1.0 S       *   : 0.26 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LV-06  : SHINER 5.8 ENE           *   : 0.26 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LV-26  : SHINER 4.1 NE            *   : 0.26 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-UV-19  : CAMP WOOD 5.02 SSE       *   : 0.26 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BLC-04 : JOHNSON CITY 7.3 W       *   : 0.25 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BLC-12 : BLANCO 1.8 ESE           *   : 0.25 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-24  : WILLOW CITY 0.1 W        *   : 0.25 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-91 : WIMBERLEY 4.6 WNW        *   : 0.25 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LV-27  : MOULTON 6.9 SE           *   : 0.25 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-199 : BEE CAVE 1.8 NW          *   : 0.25 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BLC-20 : JOHNSON CITY 7.9 WNW     *   : 0.24 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-39 : DRIPPING SPRINGS 3.3 NE  *   : 0.24 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-62 : SPICEWOOD 2.5 ENE        *   : 0.23 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CLD-10 : LOCKHART 5.2 SSE         *   : 0.23 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-FY-32  : FLATONIA 0.4 SW          *   : 0.23 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-37  : FREDERICKSBURG 0.5 SW    *   : 0.23 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-59  : KERRVILLE 3.5 NW         *   : 0.23 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-58 : BURNET 5.7 WSW           *   : 0.22 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CLD-27 : LOCKHART 4.3 NW          *   : 0.22 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-68  : KERRVILLE 1.9 NE         *   : 0.22 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-06 : SPICEWOOD 4.4 NW         *   : 0.21 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-81 : BURNET 2.8 WNW           *   : 0.21 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-24 : ROSANKY 4.5 N            *   : 0.20 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CLD-15 : MAXWELL 1.5 NE           *   : 0.20 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-35 : DRIPPING SPRINGS 2.8 NNW *   : 0.20 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-49 : DRIPPING SPRINGS 6.2 WSW *   : 0.20 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-36  : INGRAM 5.9 WSW           *   : 0.20 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LV-25  : HALLETTSVILLE 4.9 E      *   : 0.20 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-22  : FREDERICKSBURG 1.3 SE    *   : 0.19 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-20  : KERRVILLE 1.1 SSW        *   : 0.19 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LL-01  : LLANO 9.2 NNW            *   : 0.19 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LV-23  : HALLETTSVILLE 1.6 SSE    *   : 0.19 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-40 : BURNET 6.1 WNW           *   : 0.18 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-34  : FREDERICKSBURG 1.0 SE    *   : 0.18 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-103: DRIPPING SPRINGS 6.0 NNE *   : 0.18 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-11  : HUNT 5.8 WSW             *   : 0.18 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-14 : BUCHANAN DAM 7.3 N       *   : 0.17 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BST-32 : RED ROCK 5.0 ESE         *   : 0.17 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-FY-36  : LA GRANGE 4.5 SW         *   : 0.17 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-53  : KERRVILLE 2.4 NNW        *   : 0.17 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LL-26  : LLANO 0.5 ESE            *   : 0.17 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-RL-05  : CAMP WOOD 7.3 NE         *   : 0.17 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-18 : DRIPPING SPRINGS 6.1 WNW *   : 0.16 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-RL-08  : LEAKEY 1.5 ENE           *   : 0.16 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-TV-133 : LAKEWAY 2.8 W            *   : 0.16 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-ED-21  : ROCKSPRINGS 6.2 NNE      *   : 0.15 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-63 : DRIPPING SPRINGS 1.7 NW  *   : 0.15 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-HYS-80 : DRIPPING SPRINGS 1.4 N   *   : 0.15 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-21  : COMFORT 8.0 NNE          *   : 0.15 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-89  : SISTERDALE 5.7 N         *   : 0.15 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LL-34  : TOW 1.6 NE               *   : 0.15 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-ED-25  : ROCKSPRINGS 6.2 S        *   : 0.14 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-18  : COMFORT 11.5 ENE         *   : 0.14 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-80  : COMFORT 0.9 WSW          *   : 0.14 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-17  : KERRVILLE 4.7 SSE        *   : 0.14 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-63  : KERRVILLE 4.8 WSW        *   : 0.14 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-57  : INGRAM 3.8 W             *   : 0.13 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-77 : BURNET 8.4 WNW           *   : 0.12 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KN-76  : FREDERICKSBURG 11.6 SSE  *   : 0.12 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-15  : STONEWALL 2.3 ENE        *   : 0.11 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-GS-33  : FREDERICKSBURG 8.3 SSW   *   : 0.11 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-22  : KERRVILLE 2.6 SSW        *   : 0.11 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KR-65  : COMFORT 4.4 W            *   : 0.11 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-VV-09  : COMSTOCK 29.7 NW         *   : 0.11 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BLC-11 : BLANCO 8.8 ENE           *   : 0.10 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-03 : BUCHANAN DAM 7.4 NNE     *   : 0.10 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BRT-57 : BURNET 10.6 NW           *   : 0.10 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BND-39 : BANDERA 0.2 N            *   : 0.09 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CLD-31 : LOCKHART 4.3 ENE         *   : 0.09 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-ED-26  : ROCKSPRINGS 8.9 SE       *   : 0.09 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-VV-14  : LANGTRY 10.6 W           *   : 0.09 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LV-05  : HALLETTSVILLE 13.4 SE    *   : 0.08 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LV-22  : HALLETTSVILLE 14.8 S     *   : 0.07 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-ED-22  : ROCKSPRINGS 11.8 ENE     *   : 0.04 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-LV-02  : HALLETTSVILLE 17.1 SE    *   : 0.04 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-UV-17  : UTOPIA 2.0 W             *   : 0.04 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-BND-02 : VANDERPOOL 1.4 SE        *   : 0.03 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CLD-32 : LOCKHART 8.4 ESE         *   : 0.03 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-VV-16  : DEL RIO 7.8 NNW          *   : 0.03 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-DW-05  : CUERO 7.3 SSW            *   : 0.02 /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-CLD-18 : DALE 7.3 SE              *   :    T /  MM /   MM /   MM

TX-KY-15  : BRACKETTVILLE 13.8 W     *   : 0.00 / 0.0 /   MM /   MM


More rainfall expected this week

July 15th, 2014 at 10:43 pm by under Weather

Many areas enjoyed beneficial rainfall Tuesday, and we are expecting more this week. We will likely see a bit of a lull Wednesday, but an upper level disturbance will bring another good chance of showers and thunderstorms by Thursday, into Friday.

Click here to see Tuesday’s rainfall totals.


Locally heavy rain of 1 to 2 inches in a short period of time may occur with storms on Thursday and Friday. This may result in localized minor flooding. As always, do not drive where water covers the road. Turn Around, Don’t Drown.

Kaxan reminds you to protect your pet from summer heat

July 14th, 2014 at 3:50 pm by under Weather

Kaxan found this great video online from Discovery News he wants to share with everyone. It is about keeping your pets cool in the summer. Click here to check it out!

car heat

Please read this important information from the Humane Society of the United States:

The summer months can be uncomfortable—even dangerous—for pets and people. It’s difficult enough simply to cope with rising temperatures, let alone thick humidity, but things really get tough in areas that are hit with the double blow of intense heat and storm-caused power outages, sometimes with tragic results.

We can help you keep your pets safe and cool this summer. Follow our tips for helping everyone in your family stay healthy and comfortable when the heat is on (and even if the power isn’t).

Practice basic summer safety

Never leave your pets in a parked car

Not even for a minute. Not even with the car running and air conditioner on. On a warm day, temperatures inside a vehicle can rise rapidly to dangerous levels. On an 85-degree day, for example, the temperature inside a car with the windows opened slightly can reach 102 degrees within 10 minutes. After 30 minutes, the temperature will reach 120 degrees. Your pet may suffer irreversible organ damage or die. Learn how to help a pet left inside a hot car »

Print our hot car flyer [PDF] and spread the life-saving word »

Watch the humidity

“It’s important to remember that it’s not just the ambient temperature but also the humidity that can affect your pet,” says Dr. Barry Kellogg, VMD, of the Humane Society Veterinary Medical Association. “Animals pant to evaporate moisture from their lungs, which takes heat away from their body. If the humidity is too high, they are unable to cool themselves, and their temperature will skyrocket to dangerous levels—very quickly.”

Taking a dog’s temperature will quickly tell you if there is a serious problem. Dogs’ temperatures should not be allowed to get over 104 degrees. If your dog’s temperature does, follow the instructions for treating heat stroke.

Limit exercise on hot days

Take care when exercising your pet. Adjust intensity and duration of exercise in accordance with the temperature. On very hot days, limit exercise to early morning or evening hours, and be especially careful with pets with white-colored ears, who are more susceptible to skin cancer, and short-nosed pets, who typically have difficulty breathing. Asphalt gets very hot and can burn your pet’s paws, so walk your dog on the grass if possible. Always carry water with you to keep your dog from dehydrating.

Don’t rely on a fan

Pets respond differently to heat than humans do. (Dogs, for instance, sweat primarily through their feet.) And fans don’t cool off pets as effectively as they do people.

Provide ample shade and water

Any time your pet is outside, make sure he or she has protection from heat and sun and plenty of fresh, cold water. In heat waves, add ice to water when possible. Tree shade and tarps are ideal because they don’t obstruct air flow. A doghouse does not provide relief from heat—in fact, it makes it worse.

Cool your pet inside and out

Whip up a batch of quick and easy DIY peanut butter popsicles for dogs. (You can use peanut butter or another favorite food.) And always provide water, whether your pets are inside or out with you.

Keep your pet from overheating indoors or out with a cooling body wrap, vest, or mat (such as the Keep Cool Mat). Soak these products in cool water, and they’ll stay cool (but usually dry) for up to three days. If your dog doesn’t find baths stressful, see if she enjoys a cooling soak.

Watch for signs of heatstroke

Extreme temperatures can cause heatstroke. Some signs of heatstroke are heavy panting, glazed eyes, a rapid heartbeat, difficulty breathing, excessive thirst, lethargy, fever, dizziness, lack of coordination, profuse salivation, vomiting, a deep red or purple tongue, seizure, and unconsciousness.

Animals are at particular risk for heat stroke if they are very old, very young, overweight, not conditioned to prolonged exercise, or have heart or respiratory disease. Some breeds of dogs—like boxers, pugs, shih tzus, and other dogs and cats with short muzzles—will have a much harder time breathing in extreme heat.

How to treat a pet suffering from heatstroke

Move your pet into the shade or an air-conditioned area. Apply ice packs or cold towels to her head, neck, and chest or run cool (not cold) water over her. Let her drink small amounts of cool water or lick ice cubes. Take her directly to a veterinarian.

Prepare for power outages

Before a summer storm takes out the power in your home, create a disaster plan to keep your pets safe from heat stroke and other temperature-related trouble.


From triple digits to potentially flooding rain

July 14th, 2014 at 10:17 am by under Weather

After triple-digit heat in many communities Sunday and again Monday, a major pattern change is in store featuring cooler temperatures and the chance of beneficial rainfall.

Courtesy of the National Weather Service

Courtesy of the National Weather Service

An unusual July cold front sweeping down the Plains today is forecast to stall over northern Texas Tuesday and Wednesday, then progress through Central Texas Thursday and Friday.

While the front is to our north, we can expect scattered showers and thunderstorms Tuesday and Wednesday.

Rain chances will increase with the front’s passage, currently forecast to occur overnight Thursday into Friday morning.

Moisture is forecast to “pool” along the frontal boundary, setting up a tropical atmosphere and the potential of heavy rainfall.

We always welcome beneficial rain during a drought, but as happens all too often in Central Texas, the potential does exist for getting too much in too little time.

96          102

The images above show the forecast rainfall (radar) picture overnight Thursday into Friday morning.

Computer models are suggesting the possibility of a complex of heavy thunderstorms forming along the front as it moves through Central Texas.

It is important to note that much uncertainty still exists, as this event is still 3-4 days away. Stay tuned to KXAN and KXAN.com as we continue to draw a clearer picture of this late-week rainfall.


Triple digit heat Sunday a first for 2014

July 13th, 2014 at 9:32 pm by under Weather

Sunday was Austin’s first 100 degree day of 2014. It arrived just three days past the average first 100 degree day, July 10th. The last time Camp Mabry recorded 100 degrees or higher was September 7, 2013.

With another 100 degree day in the works, it’s a good time to review summer heat safety.

Sunday sunset over Lake Travis. (KXAN)

Sunday sunset over Lake Travis. (KXAN)

Here’s some really great information from NOAA.

If you plan on being out and about in summer, chances are you’ll be exposed to a lot of sun and higher temperatures.

Each year, heat kills at least 650 people on average in the United States — more than tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, lightning, or any other weather event combined.

“Heat can be a silent killer because it doesn’t topple trees or rip roofs off houses like tornadoes and hurricanes,” says Eli Jacks, chief of fire and public weather services with NOAA’s National Weather Service. “Nevertheless, it’s a dangerous weather condition for which people should prepare.”

How much heat can a person safely endure? It depends.

Certain groups of people should be especially careful during hot weather conditions. For example, city-dwellers and those living in the upper floors of tall buildings or in heat-prone regions are most at-risk for heat-related illness. People who have difficulty getting around or who have health conditions are particularly susceptible. The elderly and the very young also merit special attention during periods of high heat and humidity.

The National Weather Service and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration have partnered again this year to increase awareness for outdoor workers and their employers during excessive heat events. As part of this effort, the National Weather Service will incorporate specific outdoor worker safety precautions when heat advisories and warnings are issued.

By taking some precautions, you can stay healthy while enjoying the great outdoors this summer:

1. Be informed and stay alert

Pay close attention to heat advisories or warnings that have been issued for your community.

  • NOAA’s National Weather Service continually updates heat-related advisories and warnings online at weather.gov. (Click on “Excessive Heat Warning” and “Heat Advisory” under the U.S. map — if there are no current warnings or advisories in the United States, nothing will appear).
  • NOAA issues excessive heat warnings when weather conditions pose an imminent threat to life and heat advisories when weather conditions are expected to cause significant discomfort or inconvenience or — if caution is not taken — become life threatening.
  • If you do not have Internet access, you can get heat advisory and warning information by watching your local television or radio newscast or by purchasing a NOAA weather radio and tuning into NOAA Weather Radio All-Hazards.
  • Use the temperature and humidity to figure out the heat index for your area, a measure that tells us how hot it feels.

Read the rest of this entry »